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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY- SEVEN 

SEPTEMBER 17, 1913— SEPTEMBER 9, 1914 



Title 



No. Page 



About Heroism 46 

Accident Insurance ("Titanic" payments) 36 
Acid Test, Tile (A. F. of L. vs. I. W. 

W.) 20 

Adventure, Tlie Spirit of 26 

Africa Deports Labor Leaders 27 

African Strike Outrages Reviewed 32 

Africa, Opening Up 31 

Alaska I'isiiermen's Deatb List 18 

Alaska's Fossil Plants 32 

Alaska's Government-Built Railway 25 

Alaska's Mineral Wealtb 17 

Alaska's Resources 28 

Alcohol, The Great Destroyer (by R. 

P. Hobson) 29 

Alien Head Tax, Revenue from 37 

Aliens and Their Problems 10 

American Federation of Labor — 

Convention Call 3 

Report on Industrial Unionism 6 

The Seattle Convention 9-6; 11-3; 

Delegate Scharrenberg's Report to S. 

F. Labor Council 13 

Blame It on Gompers 26 

Sentences Set Aside (Gompers, Mit- 
chell, Morrison) 35 



6 
6 

2 
2 
6 

11 
2 

10 

10 
7 
8 

10 

10 

11 

8 



1 
12-7 



Bill. 



39 
40 
49 
49 
26 



7 
7 
3 

10 
9 



Executive Council on Seamen s 
Gompers Issues Stirring Call.. 
Gompers' Attitude on War.... 

Ammons and Otis 

Andaman Islands, The 

Aloha, Hawaii 23 6 

An "Exceptional" Judge (Bradley V. 

Sargent) 7 10 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Land "Without" Strikes 8 10 

That "Industrial Paradise" 11 7 

"Innocent" Third Party, The 16 7 

"Scabitration" Unions (in New Zea- 
land) 24 6 

Strikes and the Public 35 1 

Mediation and Conciliation 36 7 

Waterside Workers Arbitration Award 41 10 
New South Wales Bakers Dispute 

with Arbitration Board 48 4 

Areas Below Sea-Level 9 10 

Are We Progressing? 33 6 

Armies of History 35 11 

Asbestos, Production of 10 8 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

Japan's Unemployment Problem 3 11 

Canada Bars Hindoos IS 15 

Judge Dooling Bars Hindoos. . 15-10, 13; 27-13 
Chinese "More Satisfactory" (C. P. 

R. Co.) 16 6 

Dollar Imports Chinese (Mackinaw) 

.19-7; 22-6; 23-5; 24-6; 27-6; 35-6 



Mutiny, Etc., by Oriental Crews 29 

"Safety" With Cheap Labor 31 

Difference of Opinion, A (upon Asiatic 

Crews) ^-j 

Chinese-Built Steam Ferry 34 

Japanese Gunmen in Colorado Strike. 36 

Poverty in Japan 42 

Japan's Merchant Navy 4.^ 

Protest Against Japanese Fishermen 

in British Columbia 44 

Asia for Asiatics 49 

Asiatics on British Ships ^>U 

Associated Press '^ 

Atlantic Coast Situation •' 

Atlantic Liners ;* 

Austrian Antarctic L.xpedition -" 

Australasian Seamen, Etc. — 

./Xustralia's Population ■ ^ 

Overtime for Seamen (New Zealand 

Supreme Court) ^ 

Land "Without" Strikes 8 

New Zealand to Build Navy 10 

That "Industrial Paradise" ••• U 

New Zealand Maritime Workers Strike 

14-4, 6; lS-6; 22-7: 

Unionism in Australia 17 

"Scabitration" Unions 24 

Vou Should Kii.,v. ^ . 2.T 



'Sea! 
Facts 



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Title No. Page 

Speech, A Memorable (b}' Editor of 

"Maoriland Worker") 41 

Daily Labor Paper in Sydney 

Waterside Workers Arbitration Award 41 
44-Hour Week for Quarry Workers.. 

B 

Back to the Land 

Beri-Beri and its Cause 

"Biggest" Ships, The 

Blame It on Gompers 

Boats for All (by H, B. Joyce) 

"Bonus" Tragedy, The 

Bouquets and Brickbats (on Furuseth's 
Appointment) 

Boycott on Sperry Flour 

British Employers Unite 

British Marine luigineers Strike 

British Over-Sea Possessions 

British Shipping Casualties 

British Ships, Missing 

British Trade-Union Congress 

Buchanan (Congressman), Urges Sea 
Safety 

Budapest, Unemployed at 

Bureau Veritas, Report for 1913 

Bulgaria's Waste of Life 

Bunks versus Cells 

Burns' Hirelings at Work (Wheatland 
trials) 19 6 

Buryeson, F. H., Comment, Etc., by — 

Machine Made Idleness 1 2 

Political versus Direct Action 1 2 

By the Way 2-2; 3-2; 4-2; 5-2 

One Man's Views 

18-9; 19-9; 20-9; 21-9; 24-9; 

26-9; 27-9; 30-11; 33-10; 35-9; 37-9; 

39-9; 41-11; 43-11; 46-11; 47-8; 49-11; 51-11 

From Another Angle 37 2 

Men or Dollars? 45 11 



41 


2 


41 


4 


41 


10 


44 


4 


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6 


1 


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40 


2 


26 


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17 


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1 


8 


13 


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46 


2 


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44 


8 


21 


10 


52 


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35 


2 


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10 


49 


3 


49 


4 


50 


8 


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2 


28 


6 



California, Births and Deaths in 1913.. 36 

California's High Mountains 15 8 

California's Labor Camps (see "Labor 

Camps" and Wheatland Hop-Pickers 

Trials, Etc.). 

California, Prison F'opulation in 38 13 

California State Federation of Labor, 

14th Annual Convention 6 

California State Insurance Fund 21 

Candidates, Questioning of 40 

Canadian Labor Organizations." 50 

Canada, Immigration to 23 

Canada. Organized Labor in 1 

Canadian Labor Congress 6 

Cape Cod Canal 2 

Captain Dollar Called (by A. B. Gibson) 33 
Caustic Comment on London Conference 

(by W. Sprow) 14 

Cells versus Bunks 28 

Cement Region, Greatest 15 

Chamberlain & Ohler Exposed 32 

Chamberlain's Xervc 34 

Chicago's Outer Harbor 5 

Child Labor in the South 47 

Child Labor, One Aspect of 41 

Chile, Imports of I^umber 40 

Chile, Labor Movement in 46 

Chinese (sec "Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc.") 

Cholera, Ship-Borne 20 

Citizenship, Training for 16 

Coal for Arkansas 17 

Coal. Pacific Coast ' 16 

Coal in the Klonrlike IS 

Coal in Washington 26 

Coast Seamen's Journal — 

Volume Twenty-Seven 1 6 

"Safety First" (.Special Issue) 44-6; 45 

In the New IIf)me 47 6 

Coastwise Trade, The 3 6 

Coaxing the Sea to Build 39 11 

Colorado Coal Miners' Strike, Etc 

14-3. 12: 17-11; 

20-13: 22-7: 24-2; 25-3; 27-8; 33-3; 

,34-6: 35-3. 12: .36-6. 10. 13. 37-3. 10: 

Vj,'> u\- it\.T ai.in .i; l7,„,i';,->- i« «• ci u in 



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Title No. Page 

Colorado's Militia 21-8; 28-8; 34-6; 

36-6, 9; 37-10; 38-8; 41-10; 43-9; 44-8; 52-12 



Colorado River Expedition 34 

Community Cheated, A 22 

Computation of Wages (by U. S. Ship- 
ping Commissioner) 29 

Conflict of Two Rights (Rockefeller, Jr.) 33 
Consolidation of Revenue Cutter and 

Life Saving Services 15 

Conspiracy Trials, The 18 

"Contra Costa" Largest Ferryboat. 

Launched 36 

Contrast, A (Justice in Contra Costa 

County) 36 

Contrasts Aboard Ship 5 

Convicts on Roads 21 

Coolie Lovers Protest! 14 

Corrupt Lobby at Work 16 

"Couches" for Firemen 15 



10 
10 

11 
3 

13 
6 



7 
8 
11 
6 
1 
6 



Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

(See also "Workmen's Compensation") 
Overtime for Seamen in New Zealand 3 9 

"Roanoke" Salvage 5-7; 37-8 

Local Seamen Not Exempt from .\t- 

tachment (Honolulu decision) 9 2 

Eight Hour Law for Nurses Upheld.. 14 12 
Judge Dooling Bars Hindoos . 1 5-11). 13; 27-13 
Supreme Court Awards Damages 
(Schellin vs. North .Maska Salmon 

CZo.) ;,....•... 20 1 

"Titanic," British Court of Appeal's 

Decision 24 IS 

Award for Shortage of Food ("Ed- 
ward R. West") 27 5 

Shipowners Liability, Decisions on. 23-1; 27-2 
Wage Deductions Illegal, Judge Dool- 
ing's Decision (Schmidt vs. Pac. 

Mail Steamship Co.) 36 6 

No Overtime at Sea (British High 

Court Decision) 36 10 

Award for Injury Due to Collision 

( Latz vs. "Gualala") 36 11 

Award to Alaska Fisherman (Peter 
Larsen vs. North Alaska Salmon 

Co.) 36 11 

Cozumel, Island of 26 2 

Cretaceous .Age, The 31 10 

Curse of Dual Unionism, The 46 1 



Danes Unreconciled 39 

Danish Fisiierics 34 

Death Rate in Occupations 2Z 

Deckloads, Regarding 44 

Decentralization 5 

"Defense l'"unds," Regarding 47 

Department of Labor, I-'irsl .Annual Re- 
port 28 

Deporting Labor Leaders (from South 

Africa) 27 

"De World Do Move" 10 

"Desirable" Crews, About 17 

Disasters at Sea, Facts About SO 

Disasters on the Lakes 45 

Discipline, ,\ Plea for 36 

Diseases, Suppression of 25 

Divers, Female 4H 

Dividends (.Shipowners') 15-40 per cent 31 
D»)llar, Captain. Called (by A. B. Gib- 
son ) . . . , 33 

Dollar Imports Chinese (sec also 
"Asiatics, Etc."). 

Dollar. Robert, "Patriot" 13 

"Dollar" Tip. A 10 

Doolcy on the Open Shop 46 

Dual Unionism, The Curse of 46 



Earnings f)f Parilic Coast Steamship Co. 7 

"Kdsy" Money. Looking for 40 

Earth's Interior _. . . . 26 

Educational Value of Safety Campaigns 44 

EfTiricncy, Thesis on 35 

Eight Hour Law — 

Fitrht- 1 1'liir l.;iw Discussed 25 

'i< '•••r'r -:ic'd>tirii .Scnvc 



2 

i5 

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11 



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COAST Sl::.\Mt;N'b JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-SEVEN. 



Title No. Page 

Enforcement of Law in Washington, 

D. C 40 13 

Text of Proposed California Eight- 
Hour Law 47 1 

Argument for Universal Eight-Hour 

Law (by Thos. W. Williams) 47 1 

The Shorter Workday 47 6 

What's In a Name? SO 6 

Electricity, Doings of 52 9 

Elements That Retard Solidarity 48 10 

Elephant Seals..... 8 9 

"Emancipators," Tricks of 38 7 

Emigration Through Hamburg and 

Bremen 9 9 

"Emmons," His Name Is 22 6 

"Empress of Ireland" Disaster — 

Editorial Comment 38 6 

No New Problem 39 6 

Commendable Frankness 39 6 

Comment of the Press 40 1 

Steps to Recover Bodies 40 15 

Structural .\rrangements 41 2 

The Unsinkable Ship 45 6 

Special Board of Inquiry Reports 45 14 

A Pastor to the Rescue.. 46 7 

Collier "Storstad" Sold 46 15 

The Empress Verdict 47 7 

Enemv, Our Common 46 8 

Enforce the Law (By V. A. Olander) . . . 44 1 
Engine Room, From the (By A. B. 

Gibson) 45 7 

Environment and Character 47 8 

Europe's Seamen Active 38 6 

Examiner "Flops." The 17 1 

Exclusion of .Asiatics (see "Asiatics, Ex- 
clusion, etc."). 

Explaining Hard Times 44 11 

Expose, A Timely (By V. A. Olander). 42 2 

F 

Facts About Disasters at Sea (By V. A. 

Olander) 50 1 

"Fake" Mutiny Exposed 12 10 

Fallacies of T. W. W 1 2 

Farm .^nima1s in U. S., Value of 23 13 

Fels, Joseph, Death of 26-7, 13 

Female Divers 48 9 

Female Labor in England and Wales.. 34 4 
Ferryboat, Largest, Launched (Contra 

Costa) 36 5 

Firemen Meet .^wful Death ("Quin- 

ault") 20 7 

Fires at Sea, Great 25 8 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

S.ilinon Packers' Wages 2 7 

Fishing Craft. Modern 4 7 

British Columbia Salmon Pack 7 9 

Elephant Seals 8 9 

Southeastern Alaska Fishermen's 

Grievances 10 2 

New I'-ish-Curing Method 10 8 

Sardine Industry, The 13 10 

Menhaden Industry, The 13 10 

Dutch Fishermen's Strike 14 10 

Hunting the Porpoise 15 8 

The Sea's Inhabitants 15 9 

Salt Water Bailiffs 15 9 

Whaling in Southern Chile 16 10 

Salmon, I-"ecding Habits of 18 2 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List 18 10 

Deep-Sea Fishes 18 10 

License Tax on Fishermen Constitu- 
tional 19 5 

Alaska Packers' Ass'n., Report for 1913 21 5 

Fishing Spider, A 22 10 

Fisheries' Congress 24 2 

Salmon Day, National 25 10 

Alaska Seal, The 28 8 

Japanese Crab Products 32 2 

A Share of the Catch (Newfoundland 

Banks) 32 9 

Swedish Lobster Fishery 34 2 

Danish Fisheries 34 10 

Japanese Fishermen in British Colum- 
bia 44 6 

Whaling on Coast of Lower California 48 5 

Salmon for Maine Waters 50 8 

Sea Food Resources 51 9 

Salmon Fleet Returning 52 5 

Flagpole, Largest in the World 40 5 

Flour, Substitute for 33 10 

Food and Disease 7 6 

Food for Thought 31 7 

Fooling the Passengers 5 6 

Forecastles, "A Frank Admission" 1 6 

Forecastles, Better 3 6 

Forcing Confessions (Wheatland Trials) 19 10 

Ford's Munificence 32 9 

Freedom (By Macaulay) 40 10 

Freedom of Contract 42 6 

Free Tolls and Cheap Crews 33 6 

French Seamen, Condition of 42 1 

French Ship Subsidies 44 14 

Frenzied Finance, More 40 6 

Fuel Oil Situation, The 48 11 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles, Etc., by — 

Safety of Passengers at Sea _. . . 15 1 

Appointment and Resignation as U." S. 

Delegate to London Conference.... 

7-3.9-2; 11-2; 18-2; 19-6, 8; 21-1 

Report on Hearings (March 14, 1914). 28 2 

The Fugitive Seamen's Law 31 2 

London Treaty Analyzed, The 38 1 

Furuseth Called a Shyster Lawyer.... 43 7 

Abolish tha Slave Laws 45 11 

G-H 

"Gentleman"? Who Is a 43 6 

German Merchant Marine, Growth of.. 27 11 

German Seamen, Condition of 5 1 

German Shipping Prosperous 9 10 

Glimpse Backward. A 16 9 

Gompers. Blame It On 26 6 



Title No. Page 

Great Lakes — 

To Raise Lake Erie 1 10 

On the Great Lakes (November Dis- 
asters) 11 6 

Lake Shipowners Holler 11 8 

Soo Canal, Business of 13 10 

Truth .-Miout Disasters on the Lakes. 15 1 
Lakes Disasters (Too Much "Mys- 
tery") 44 1 

Disasters on the Lakes 45 6 

Lakes Excusion Vessels, Overcrowd- 
ing of 46 8 

Articles by Victor A. Olander (see 
"O"). 

Greed Forcing Wars 33 7 

Greenland, Census of 16 2 

Grim Humor 43 6 

Gulf Stream, Power of 22 9 

Hamburg Dock Laborers 29 8 

Hard Times. Explaining the 44 11 

Hatch-Tenders' Law 18 7 

Hawaii, .Moha 23 6 

Head Tax, .\lien. Revenue from 37 11 

Hearst Converted .■\gain 48 6 

Hearst in Mexico! 35 2 

Hearst, Then and Now! 40 6 

Hearst, Tricky Willie (Sacramento Bee) 18 8 

Height Standard Reduced 38 8 

Heroes of Peace and War 35 7 

Heroes, Unsung ("San Valerio") 41 7 

Heroism, About 46 6 

Heroism, Rewarding (?) 22 7 

Hindoos (see "Asiatics, Exclusion, 

Etc."). 
Historic Murder Afloat ("Herbert Ful- 
ler") 3 8 

History, Bits of 25 8 

Hoboes Organize 29 10 

Holland, Merchant Marine of 44 14 

Home Rule for Ireland 38 15 

Homesteads, More 44 2 

Horses, Women and Children 12 10 

House Labor Group Scores 34 9 

Humphrey's (Chinese) Whine 37 6 

Humphrey Pleads for the Japs 52 6 

Humor. Grim 43 6 

Hungarian Farm Workers 5 9 

"Hyades," First Officer Found Guilty of 

Assaulting Seamen 21 6 

I 

Illiteracy a Menace to the Nation 47 3 

Immigration Bill, The (By John I. No- 
lan) 26 1 

Immigration Conference, Western Labor 

5-6; 13-1 

Immigration Problem, Our 12 3 

Immigration Record 50 10 

Immigration, Restriction of 26 6 

Immigration's Iniury to Labor 20 10 

Immigration to Canada 23 4 

"Inipcrator's" Cargo, The 2 .'^ 

Industrial Insurance. Favored by U. S. . . 43 10 

Industrial Relations, Investigating 49 1 

Industrial Unionism 6 1 

Industrial Unrest 50 2 

Injunction, Governrrent by, Etc. (See 
also .Shcrmnn .\nti-Trust Law) — 

To Limit Court Injunctions 11 1 

Injunctions in Labor Disputes (By 

Jackson H. Ralston ) 29 1 

Injunction Judges Scored (By Con- 
gressman .Sherwood) 39 3 

Unlawful to Talk (Injunction by Fed- 
eral Judge Humphrey) 44 10 

Massachusetts' .Anti-Injunction Law... 46 10 
International Seamen's Union of Amer- 
ica — 

Atlantic Coast Situation 3 1 

Seamen's Bill, Press Comment on.... 3-7; 

9-1; 17-9; 18-9; 19-11; 24-10; 43-2,3; 44-2; 48-2 

Seamen's Bill, Status of 5 6 

Consideration of Seamen's Bill 6 8 

Seamen's Bill Passes Senate 7 1 

Seamen's Bill in the House 7 6 

"Safety At Sea," What It Is 8 1 

Furuseth Hopeful 8 7 

A Call for Help 9 6 

Gist of the Seamen's Bill 10 1 

Seamen's Bill O. K.'d (N. Y. Ameri- 
can) 10 10 

Floating Death .Traps (S. F. Daily 

News) 11 9 

For Sake of Appearances (N. Y. CalD 11 9 
A Familiar Outcry (La FoUette's 

Weekly) 11 10 

Following the Storm (La FoUette's 

Weekly) 12 8 

A Mud-Slinging Campaign 13 6 

The London Conference 14 1 

Safety of Passengers at Sea 15 1 

Big Business "Squeals" (Protest 

Against Seamen's Bill) 15 1 

Is This Fair Play? (Communication to 

S. F. Examiner) 15 7 

Corrupt Lobby at Work 16 1 

The Examiner "Flops" 17 1 

Boats For All (By H. B. Joyce) 17 2 

Call of the Roll, The 19 6 

Dividends vs. Safety 21 1 

Secretary Hanson's Report 21 10 

Facts About the Seamen's Bill 22-1; 24-1 

If It Could Be Shown? 24 6 

Furuseth's Report on Hearings 28 2 

Opposition to Seamen's Bill 28 6 

Let People "Float Around" 29 1 

Seamen's Memorial to Congress 30 1 

Publicity— At Last 30 6 

Furor Scribendi! 30 6 

.Significant Testimony (Uhler's) 30-6, 10 

Fugitive Seamen's Law, The 31 2 

Was It A Frame-Up? (London Con- 
ference) 32 6 

Is the Seamen's Bill Side-Tracked? . . . 33 1 

A Gentle Reminder 33 6 



Title No 

Praise for Seamen's Bill (By D. Thos. 

Davies) 34 

Plain Talk (By J. W. Bryan) 37 

Safety at Sea Society 37 

Crowing Too Soon 37 

A. F. of L. Executive Council on Rec- 
ord 39 

Action — At Last ! 40 

I. S. U. Delegates Call Upon Presi- 
dent Wilson 40-6; 

Near-Disasters 41 

The Alexander Substitute 41 

Victory in Sight 41 

Boston Convention, Report on 41 

The Substitute Bill ,. 42 

Dividends Before Safety! 43 

Minority Report on Seamen's Bill (By 

Mr. Bryan) 44 

-Safety, The Struggle for 45 

Platform Pledges! 45 

Only .'Kcrobats Would Be Saved 46 

Anything But Safety at Sea 47 

House Adopts Substitute Bill 51 

Congress Debates Seamen's Bill 52 

The Substitute Seamen's Bill 52 

Inspecting the "Congress" 6 

Insurance, Industrial 43 

Insurance for Sickness Is Coming 38 

Insurance. Marine 40 

Involuntary Servitude Abolished in U. S. 

Navy 46 

Ireland, Home Rule for 38 

Italian Seamen's Lockout 45 

Italy's Merchant Marine 50 

I. W. W.ism .\nalyzed 31 

I. W. W. Disrupters at Butte, Mont 41 

I. W. W. Fallacies 1 

I. W. W. Hypocrites 14 



Page 

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(see 



J-K 

".Asiatics, 



Exclusion, 



Japanese 
Etc."—). 

Jones, "Mother" 24-8; 31-10; 36-3 

Justice — Not Charity! 31 1 

Key to the Labor Movement, A 51 1 

Kidnaped by Burns' Detectives 11 10 

"Killing Pacific Trade" 9 7 

"Klamath," Suspension of Officers' Li- 
cences for Going to Sea Shorthanded. 13 5 



"Labor" and the University 2 7 

Labor Camps in California 24 7 

Labor Camps in California (Unionism's 



Work)...... 34 

in California (see also 
Hop-Pickers' Trials, 



Constructive 
Labor Camps 
"Wheatland 
Etc.") 
Labor Council Protests ("Mackinaw's" 

Chinese Crew) 22 6 

Labor Day Reverie (By Samuel Gom- 
pers) 52 7 

Labor Defended in Senate 51 3 

Labor, Department of. First Annual Re- 
port 28 7 

Labor Exchanges 33 8 

Labor in Chile 46 4 

Labor Laws in Japan 8 10 

Labor Laws of 1913..^ 14 2 

Labor Movement, A Key to the 51 1 

Labor Movement, The 25 2 

Labor Power Is Not Property 44 3 

Labor-Saving Devices 35 8 

Labor Secretariats, The 14 8 

Labor. The Power of 40 8 

Labor's .Attitude on War 50 8 

Labor's Memorial Sunday 36 3 

Lake Shipowners Holler 11 8 

Lakes (see Great Lakes"). 

Land Grabbing in Tripoli 8 8 

Land Monopoly 43 9 

Land Monopoly, Extent of 47 9 

Land Still Untilled 52 9 

Lapland, Iron Mines of 22 2 

Largest Steamship ("Vaterland"). Speed 

of 36-15; 37-14; 39-7 

Lashed to Death 8 9 

Laundries, Patronize White 28 8 

Leprosy in the U. S 9 9 

Liability (see also "Workmen's Compen- 
sation, Etc." — ). 

Liability of Shipowners, The 23 

Liability of Shipowners (By F. R. Wall) 27 
Liability, Limited, for Losses at Sea (By 

Thomas L Parkinson) 45 

Liability or Compensation? 7 

Licensed Men. Victory for 47 

Licenses, Revoking ("Yellowstone").... 37 

Lief Erickson's Gold 22 

Lie Nailed. A 3 

Life Belts Don't Save Life 45 

Lifeboat, A Real 52 

Lifeboat (Lundin's) .Approved 39 

Lifeboats, Senator Lane on 9 

Life-Saver Ingenious •. . ^ 

Life-Saving Service. Consolidation with 

Revenue Cutter Service 16 

Lighthouse Service, The' 16 

Lighthouse. The Automatic 12 

Light & Power Council's Strike 13 

Literacy Test .Approved by Farmers.... 21 

Living, Increase in 5 

Living Wage Stays Disease 42 

Lloyd's Register, Construction of Ships, 

Etc 36-15, 41-2; 47-15 

Lobby Methods of Manufacturers Re- 
buked 15 

Log Raft. First of Season from Astoria. 43 
London (Conference on Safetv of Life at 

Sea 7-3; 9-12; 14-1; 18-2: 

19-6, 8: 21-1; 32-6; 34-1; 35-15; 38-1; 40-1, 3, 6 

London Treaty .Analyzed, The 38 1 

Long Island, Origin of -. ■■ 34 11 

Longshoremen of New York Affiliate 

With Internalidnal 39 12 

Longshoremen ()i.ih,-c .Seamen's Bill... 46 2 



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48-14 

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5 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-SEVEN. 



1734B9 



Title No. Page 

Long Workday is Destructive 33 11 

Lumber Cut of Grays Harbor 4 9 

Lumber from Alaska ("Melville Dollar") 2 5 

Lumber, Poisonous 14 10 

M 

"Mackinaw's" Chinese Crew (see "Asi- 
atics, Etc."). 

"Maine," Cost of Raising.... 16 14 

Make Sea Travel Safer (Portland Ore- 

gonian) 12 10 

Maldive Islands, The 2 8 

"Manga Reva" Mutiny 13-7; 20-6 

Mare Island Ferry (Owned by Workers) 34 5 

Marine Engineers' Strike (British) 44 8 

Marine Insurance ("Vaterland") 40 2 

Marine Motor Exposition 34 11 

Mediation and Conciliation 36 7 

Merchant Marine of Holland 44 14 

Merchant Marine of Italy 50 14 

Merchant Marine of Norway 17 8 

Merchant Marine of Sweden 26 2 

Merchant Marine, United States 12 1 

Merchant Marine of World 49 2 

Mexicanized Colorado 33 9 

Mexican Pacific, The 14 9 

Mexican-U. S. (Controversy, The 33 8 

Mexico and the Single Tax 44 11 

Mexico, Items About 37 8 

Mexico, The Real 36 2 

Michigan Copper Miners' Strike. . 14-3; 18-3; 19-7; 
20-3, 13; 21-3; 22-7; 23-13; 25-3; 36-12; 40-12 
Migratory Workers' Problems (Minority 

Report on Wheatland Investigation) . . 39 7 
Migratory Workers (see also "Wheat- 
land Hop-Pickers' Trials, Etc."). 

Military Arrogance 21 7 

Militarism Gone Mad 42 7 

Millionaire, First American 1 9 

Minimum Wage Legfislation — 

Oregon's Minimum Wage 5 11 

Minimum Wage Law Upheld by Wash- 
ington Supreme Court 20 3 

Oregon Law Held Constitutional (Sec- 
ond Decision) 35 13 

Wages Boards in 1950 40 9 

First Case to reach U. S. Supreme 

Court 40 13 

Minimum Wage Legislation (A Re- 
view) 41 1 

Minimum Wage Legislation (By Sam- 
uel Gompers) 43 10 

Average Wage of Telephone Girls... 46 12 

Mineral Waters 39 10 

Minor Sons of Chinese Not Subject to 

Deportation 49 6 

Missing British Ships 35 2 

Molders' Progress 1 3 

Monster Ships, Anxiety Over 14 10 

Monterey, Cal., Breakwater 15 5 

"Mother" Jones 24-8; 31-10; 36-3 

Moyer, Chas. H., Deported from Calu- 
met 18 13 

Municipal Ownership Gains 12 2 

Mutiny, Another (British ship "Phila- 
delphia") 20-7; 23-5 

Mutiny, Another "Fake" 12 6 

Mutiny, "Fake," Exposed 12 10 

Mutiny on "Manga Reva" 13-7; 20-6 

N 

Natural Gas in the U. S 14 8 

Nautical Errors, Some 8 2 

Navigation Lawrs, Suspended — 

The New Shipping Bill 50 6 

Any Way But the Right Way 50 8 

Revising Navigation Laws (By W. T. 

Duerrbeck) 52 9 

Navy Abolishes Involuntary Servitude.. 46 6 

Near-Disasters 41 6 

New San Francisco Home of Maritime 

Unions (Halftone) 4 1 

New York Earthquake, The 25 10 

Nolan, John I., Elected to Congress.... 51 7 
No More Wage Deductions ("City of 

Sydney") 36 6 

Non-Magnetic Survey 20 8 

North German Lloyd, Provisions For 

One Year 46 14 

Northern Lights 20 7 

Norway, Forbids Use of Liquor in Navy 40 15 

Norway's Merchant Marine 17 8 

Norwegian Labor Congress 4 8 

Norwegian Unions in 1912 •••• 6 2 

O 

Occupations, Death Rate in 22 2 

Occupational Diseases 8 6 

Occupations in California 49 2 

Ocean 'Phone Station, An 7 2 

Ocean's Population, The 27 9 

Ofificers, Unmannerly 27 2 

Oil King Would Control Government.. 37 3 
dander, Victor A., Articles, Etc., by — 

Pertinent Questions Answered 19 1 

Undermanning and Its Results 36 1 

The Steamboat Inspection Service.... 37 1 

A Timely Expose 42 2 

Facts About Disasters at Sea SO 1 

"One Big Union," The 29 6 

Open Shop, Dooley on the 46 8 

Open-Shop Operators (Wireless) 36 9 

Opium for Chinese Crews 2 6 

Oregon Exports for 1913 19 5 

Oregon State Federation of Labor Con- 
vention 21 10 

Organization Is "It" 32 7 

Organizations of Workers Are Not 

Trusts 50 3 

Organized Labor in Canada 1 1 

Oratory Not Dead! 49 9 

Outrageous Verdict, An ("Manga Reva") 20 6 
Our Merchant Marine (By Walter Mac- 

arthur) 12 1 

Our New Home at San Francisco 4 6 

iiiiiiliil 



Title 



No. Page 



Pacific Coast Coal 16 10 

Pacific Coast "Friends," Our 12 6 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co., Earnings.. 7 5 
Panama Canal — 

The Panama Canal 6 6 

Panama Canal Facts 6 7 

Panama Canal Tolls 

18-5; 25-1; 31-6; 32-7; 33-6; 40-13; 43-13 

Canal Force Reduced 26 3 

Dredge "Culebra" Makes First Com- 
plete Trip Through Canal 40 7 

First Freight Through Canal 41 14 

Canal Cost To Date 42 8 

The Healthy Canal Zone 42 8 

The Canal Is Open 49 7 

History of the Canal 49 7 

First Warship to Pass Through Canal 51 14 

Parcel Post Lesson, A '37 10 

Pastor to the Rescue, A 46 7 

Patriots or Liars? 17 6 

Paying the Penalty (Portland Water- 
front) 17 10 

Peabody's Reward 51 9 

Pellagra Traced to Mills 50 10 

Pertinent Questions Answered (By V. A. 

Olander) 19 1 

Petroleum Displaces Coal 6 7 

Petroleum Production in California 14 13 

Philippines, Slavery in 24 8 

Pilots of San Francisco Win in U. S. 

Supreme Court 8 5 

Plea for Man Below 47 10 

Poisonous Lumber 14 10 

Polish Workers in Revolt 2 11 

Political Candidates, Questioning of.... 40 7 

Poll Tax, The Unjust 31 6 

Pompeii, Rebuilding 16 9 

Pope Pius X, Death of 50 15 

Porpoise, Hunting the 15 8 

"Port and Starboard," Goodby 43 2 

Power of Labor, The 40 8 

Pratas Island Phosphate 9 9 

Preferential Voting 2 9 

Preserving Labor Disputes 47 9 

"President" Tragedy off Cape Blanco... 

12-5, 6; 17-5; 50-5 

President Wilson's Labor Day Message 52 11 

Privateers, The 26 8 

Private Armies Must Go 24 10 

Production of Asbestos 10 8 

Production vs. Men 48 3 

Professors on the Rampage 35 6 

Profit Sharing No Relief 20 2 

Progress and Poverty 3 2 

Prohibition, Defeated in Texas 49 13 

Promise vs. Performance (I. W. W. vs. 

A. F. of L.) 24 6 

Public Health Service, The 50 9 

Public Land for Entry 20 8 

Public Opinion, Who Molds (Associated 

Press) 18 1 



Q-R 

Questioning Candidates in California.... 40 

Radio-Telegraphy at Sea 12 

Radium May Drive Ship 25 

Radium, Why Confine It to 31 

Random Thoughts (on War) 50 

"Recall" of Senator Owens 

2-6; 17-6; 23-7; 27-6; 30-6 

Regarding Deckloads 44 6 

Results of Overcrowding on Lakes Ex- 
cursion Vessels 46 8 

Revenue Cutter Service, Consolidation 

with Life Saving Service 15 

Rewarding (?) Heroism 22 

"Roanoke" Salvage 5 

Russian Workers' Condition 4 

Rusting of Ship's Plates 4 



7 
9 
9 
10 

7 



13 
7 
7 

10 
9 



Sacramento a Seaport 22 

Safety Campaigns, Educational Value of 44 

Safety Devices and Seamen 45 

Safety of Passengers at Sea (By An- 
drew Furuseth) 15 

Safety vs. Limited Liability for Losses 
at Sea (By Thomas I. Parkinson).... 45 

"Safety" With Cheap Labor 31 

Sailor's Experience, A 40 

Sailors, They Were Only ("Columbian") 38 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Halftone of New Home 4 

Delegates' Report (California State 

Federation of Labor) 6 

Wilson, Wm. B., at Seattle Meeting.. 10 
Wilson, Wm. B., at San Francisco.... 10 
Port Townsend Hospital (Resolution) 13 
Resolutions on Rartlctt-Bacon Bills.. 14 
Resolution on Michigan Miners' Strike 19 
Delegate's Report (Oregon State Fed- 
eration of Labor) 21 

Delegate's Report (Washington State 

Federation of Labor) 23 

"Sixth of March" Celebration 25 

Resolution on New Hospital at San 

Francisco 26 

The "Sixth of March" 26 

Delegates Elected to I. S. U. of A. 

Convention 36 

Instructions to I. S. U. of A. Dele- 
gates 36 

Delegates' Report on I. S. U. of A. 

Convention at Boston 41 

In The New Home 47 

DECEASED MEMBERS. 

Alander, Carl 16 

Alvares, Jose 9 

Bcngtson, Albert 10 

Rcrg, Julius 14 

Blanco, Daniel 38 

P.linn, Jas 16 

>lume Auirust 34 



ui gi' 



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10 

10 
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7 

7 

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7 
7 
7 
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7 
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I'it'e No. Page 

Brady, Joseph 46 7 

Branz, Karl 30 7 

Bredesen, 1 7 

Brelin, Emanuel Adolf 17 7 

Callow, Robert 24 7 

Chaler, Beatiste 22 7 

Christensen, J. P 24 7 

Christenson, Olaf 44 7 

Carlson, O. S 11 7 

Carson, Carl 48 7 

Dahlqvist, John G 25 7 

Doense, Joest 21 7 

Eistrat, Thomas 27 7 

Erbe, Andrew 18 7 

Ericksen, Emil 12 7 

Erickson, P. A. E 41 7 

Erlund, Carl Johan 5 7 

Felix, Hans 39 7 

Fors, Alfred 9 7 

Friis, Charles 21 7 

Garrity, James 48 7 

Gaudie, Jeremiah 5 7 

Grondahl, Frederick 24 7 

Gronman, Carl 12 7 

Hansen, Halfdan Marenius 12 7 

Hogberg, William 6 7 

Holt, Carl Martin 37 7 

Jansen, Theodore 5 7 

Johannessen, John 39 7 

Johansen, Einar Henrik 46 7 

Johanson, Algert 31 7 

Johnson, Andreas 33 7 

Johnson, Carl Johan 2 7 

Johnson, E. S 23 7 

Jungberg, Alex 42 7 

Juraschek, Oswald 12 7 

Kaio, Juri 16 7 

Kolvig, Lars 29 7 

Kerleau. Alexander 1 7 

Kiely, James 16 7 

King, Francis William 18 7 

Kohler, Karl C 30 7 

Larsen, Johan 5 7 

Lind, Oscar Gustaf Adolf 16 7 

Lindholm, Emil 14 7 

Loas, Louis 40 7 

Lude, Thorwald 40 7 

Lyons, Benjamin Franklin 2 7 

Mahoney, Michael 37 7 

Mahoney, Frank E 50 7 

Mann, George 21 7 

Marquard, Carl 52 7 

Matson, Victor 4 7 

McLoughlin, John 3 7 

Medens, John 20 7 

Mokala, John 15 7 

Moller, Lars Peter 44 7 

Muller, William 34 7 

Nagel, Arthur P. A 36 7 

Nicholas, Harry 23 7 

Nordgren, Charles M 33 7 

Norin, Lionel 2 7 

Ochmeichen, Frederick 5 7 

Olsen, Erik • 8 7 

Olsen, John 28 7 

Osmundsen, Ragnvald 9 7 

Palander, John Wiktor 20 7 

Peterson, Samuel 3 7 

Peterson, Theodore P 2 7 

Power, Richard L 14 7 

Rann, Michael 5 7 

Riley, Charles 21 7 

Sater, Andreas 51 7 

Shane, John 12 7 

Scluilz, Louis 33 7 

Sjoblom, A. J 14 7 

Smith, Fredrik 8 7 

Sparre, Johan 22 7 

Starr, Charles 26 7 

Stenbecker, Carl 46 7 

Svensson. Ale.x 16 7 

Taddiken, Johan Anton 3 7 

Trallnes, Peter 5 7 

Westburn, Tore 33 7 

Williams, John IS 7 

Sailors vs. "Sea-Navvies" 8 6 

Salmon Packers' Wages 2 7 

Salt Water Bailiffs 15 9 

Salvage With Air 10 2 

Sanctimonious Hypocrites (Baer-Rockc- 

feller) 34 1 

San Francisco — 

New Home of Maritime Unions (Half- 
tone) 4 1 

Pilots Win in U. S. Supreme Court.. 8 5 

Union-Street Line Taken Over by City 15 6 

Bids for Municipal Railway 18 13 

Number of Unemployed in January.. 21 12 
Unemployed ,'\rmy Leaving San Fran- 
cisco 26 13 

Estimated Population (July 1) 35 7 

Building Trades Lockout .\verted.... 36 12 
More Frenzied Finance (Calhoun)... 40 6 
Painters' Strike Adjusted by Arbitra- 
tion 40 12 

Federal Appropriation for Hunters' 

Point Drydock 42 5 

Bulletin's Union-Shop Edition 48 7 

Van Ness Avenue Municipal Line 

Completed 49 7 

Sanitation in the Tropics 32 II 

Santa Cruz (Cal.) Municipal Pier 13 5 

"Santa Rosalie" Mutiny 12 10 

Sardinia, Black Art in 50 2 

Sayings on War -^^ ^ 

"Scabitration" Unions 24 6 

Sea, Coaxing It to Build 39 II 

Sea Disasters, Facts About (By V. A. 

Olander) 50 I 

Sea Food Resources 51 9 

Sea Laws of the 17th Century 3 10 

Sea Leather Jf 9 

Seal Skins, Cost of 35 8 

Seamen Jailed for Striking (Facts You 

Should Know) 25 6 

Seamen Active Abroad 29 / 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-SEVEN. 



Title No. Page 

Seamen's Bill (see "International Sea- 
men's Union of /Xmerica"). 

Seamen and Fugitive Slaves 10 10 

Seamen and Safety Devices 45 10 

Seamen Scarce in Sweden 15 6 

Seamen's Heirs Wanted 2 10 

Seamen vs. Longshoremen — 

Wanted, A Frank and Friendly Spirit 12 7 

Let Us Have "Fair Play" 21 6 

The "One Big Union" 29 • 6 

"Harmony and Co-operation" 46 2 

Longshoremen Oppose Seamen's Bill. 46 2 

Seamen's Wages, Computation of 29 11 

Seamen, Unskilled, at Work (Cartoon). 45 1 

Sea Mussels 42 9 

Sea Power Plants 12 2 

Sea's Inhabitants, The 15 9 

Seattle's Municipal Street Car System. 38 13 

Seaweed, Use of 42 11 

Secretary of Labor Wilson's Report 28 7 

Sclf-Help Is Best 52 10 

Senate, Our Radical 44 6 

Senator Lane on Lifeboats 9 6 

Servants of Industry 22 2 

Settlers and Speculators 35 2 

Shame of California, The (Wheatland).. 24 7 

"Shamrock IV," Launched at Gosport.. 40 13 

Shark Rite 22 8 

Sherman Anti-Trust Law, Etc. — 

The .'\nti-Trust and Injunction Limita- 
tion Measure 11 1 

Outlawing Organized Labor 17-3: 27-1 

The Bartlett-Bacon Bill 24 3 

Labor Wants Justice, Not Immunity.. 30 3 

Printers' Narrow Escape 31 3 

'"Man" Transcends Greed 34 3 

Anti-Trust Law, The 38 3 

"Class" Legislation 39 3 

Looking Backward 39 6 

Journalistic Jeremiahs 41 2 

That "Class Legislation" Bugaboo.... 42 3 

Playing "Possum" 43 3 

"Molding" Public Opinion 44 3 

Labor Power Is Not Property 44 3 

Let There Be No Murky Zone 49 3 

Agitation Necessary 49 10 

Labor's Cause Espoused by U. S. 

Senators 52 3 

Ship-Borne Cholera 20 10 

Shipbuilding in 1913 27 9 

Shipbuilding, American 44 10 

Ship Companies Promote Immigration. 47 10 

Shipowner's Liability (By J. \V. Bryan) 23 1 
Shipowner's Liabilit)' (By Thomas I. 

Parkinson) 45 8 

Shipowner's Liability (see also Liabil- 
ity). 

Shipping Trust, The 28 6 

Ships, The "Biggest" 40 2 

Ship Subsidies, French 44 14 

Shipwrecks of the Future 31 7 

Shipwrecks That Taught Lessons 45 2 

Shipwrecks (see "Wrecks"). 

Sickness Insurance Is Coming 38 3 

Single Tax Problems 5 9 

Single Tax in Sweden 4 2 

Single Tax, The, and Mexico 44 11 

Single Tax, The 2 8 

Six Men of Dorset, The 10 10 

Slave Laws, Abolish The 45 11 

Slavery in the Philippines 24 8 

Slaves of the Coal Mines 27 8 

Slumless City, Planned by Scientists... 43 10 
Smith, Troel, Found Guilty of Assault- 
ing Seainan ("Hyades") 21 6 

Snakes in the Grass (Butte, Mont.) 41 6 

Snobbery in Sports 20 6 

Socialism, Spirit of 10 2 

Socialist Vote in France 39 15 

Social Justice, Is It Wanted? 2 2 

Social Justice, The Road to 50 9 

"Solidarity," The New 18 7 

Solving One Problem (Cal. Labor 

Camps) 49 7 

Soo Canal, Business of 13 10 

South Africa, Strike in 25 9 

South African Crime, The 1 10 

Spanish Ships' Officers Strike 40 4 

Sperry Flour Boycott 46 2 

Spider, ,\ Fishing 22 10 

Spitzbergen Coal Deposits 31 9 

State Insurance in California, Success of 47 9 

Stay Where You Are! 21 6 

Steamboat Inspection Report 16 2 

Steamboat Inspection Service, The (by 

V. A. Olander) 37 1 

Steam Ferry, Chinese Built 34 9 

Stimulants to Patriotism 5 2 

Stockholm Dockers' Strike Settled 40 4 

Stockton (Cal.) Lockout — 

The Stockton Lockout 46 6 

The Lalior War at Stockton (by 

Pauline Jacobson) 48 1 

Stockton Union Haters Would Silence 

Press 50 3 

"Cardinal Principles" 51 6 

Stone Cutters .'\malgamate 2 3 

St. Pierre and Miquelon, Decline of.... 5 10 
Straight Talk (by Sec'y. of Commerce 

Redtield) 16 7 

Strikebreakers' Methods 47 10 

Strikebreakers' Troubles 46 2 

Strikes Afloat and Ashore 10 9 

Strikes and the Public 35 1 

Strike, The Sympathetic 43 8 

Strike Worth Watching, A 42 9 

Strong and the Weak, The 36 8 

Sulzer, Wm., Removed from Office 

(Governor of New York) 7-13; 15-13 

Sundry Civil Bill Signed with Proviso.. 52 11 

Suppression of Diseases 25 2 

Swedish Merchant Marine 26 2 

Sw-eden, Seamen Scarce in 15 6 

c, „„..„. !,„*.■„ c.,;i.^ Tl,^. ±3. 



Title 



No. Page 



Tale of a Tub, A . . . : 19 

Tale of the "Folder," The (Empress of 

Ireland) 38 

Tanganyika, Lake 26 

Telegraph (Government) in England.... 20 

Tide Tables for 1915 32 

Time, Unification of 35 

Toiler, The (Traveling First Class) 7 

Torpedo, The Largest 10 

Trachoma, The Spread of 48 

Trade-Unions, What They Have Done.. 36 
Trade-Unionism's Moral Force (by Her- 
bert Casson) 28 

Trade-Unionism, What Is It? 27 

Traitorous Disruptionists (I. W'. W.'s at 

Butte, Mont.) 42 

Transport Workers' Federation, Inter- 

ii.-itioivil. Membership of 51 

Transport Workers' Growth 1 

Travesty Upon Justice, A (Wheatland 

Trials) 22 

Tribute to White Crews 17 

Tricks of "Emancipators" 38 

Truth .About Disasters on the Lakes... 15 

Typhoid F'ever Vaccine 7 

Typhoid, No More in Army 39 

U-V 

LHiler Declines to Answer 32 

Uhler, General, Shown Up 39 

Undernianning and Its Results ("Mon- 
roe") (by V. A. Olander) 36 

Unemployed Problem, The 18 

Unemployed at Budapest 49 

Unemployment Conference 29 

Unemployment, Federal Legislation 

Urged 39 

Unemployment Support (Denmark).... 4 

Unemployment vs. Immigration 23 

Union Domination vs. Safety 4 

Unionism's First Martyrs 31 

United States Army, The 37 

United States Commission on Industrial 

Relations in Pacific Coast Cities 49 

United States Department of Labor, 

First Annual Report 28 

United States Favors Industrial Insur- 
ance 43 

United States Flags, New 2 

United States Mineral Production 20 

United States Navigation Laws Sus- 
pended (see "N"). 
LInited States Navy Abolishes Involun- 
tary Servitude 46 

United States Shipbuilding for I'iscal 

Year Ending June .30, 1914 44 

Unmarried, .•\rmy of 8 

Unsinkable Ship, The 45 

Unsung Heroes ("San Valerio") 41 

Vacation Time 43 

Veritas, Bureau, Report for 1913 .SO 

Victory for Licensed Men 47 

Voting, Preferential 2 

W 

Wage Deductions, No More 36 

Wages Boards in 1950 40 

Wages, Computation of .' 29 

Wages ( from "Life") 35 

Wallis Islands, Annexed by F'rance 39 

War, European — 

-Austrian .\rchduke Murdered 43 

Summary of War News.. 47-2; 48-11; 49-8; 
Jaures. Jean Leon, Assassinated. .. .47-15; 

The Curse of War 48 

Asia For Asiatics 49 

A Blessing in Disguise 49 



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Neutrality, Proclaination of 49 

The Cost of War 49 

Gompers Against War 49 

Women and W'ar 50 

Random Thoughts (On War) 50 

Labor's .Attitude Toward War 50 

British Labor Protests 50 

Need of a Universal Eight-Hour Daj' 51 

The Cost of War 51 

To Meet the Deficit 51 

Kaiserism vs. Czarism 52 

German and Austrian Ships Captured. 52 
German Samoa Captured by Force 

From New Zealand 52 

"War Is Hell" 34 

War on Sickness SO 

War, Sayings on 38 

W'ars, Two Kinds of 51 

Washington State Federation of Labor.. 23 

Weakness in Strength 47 

Wealth Without Work 9 

Welfare Work 34-3; 

West Virginia Miners' Strike Probed 

21-11; 

What Might Have Been? (Reported "Si- 
beria" Disaster) 34 

Wheatland Hop Pickers' Trials, Etc., 

19-6, 10; 22-6; 24-7; 34-6; 39-7; 

When The Ship Goes Down (by Thomas 

I. Parkinson) 45 

Where a Knock Is a Boost (by I. M. 

Holt) 18 

White Crews, Tribute To 17 

White Men in the United States 39 

White Men, The W'orld's 32 

Who Should Worry? 33 

Why Confine It to Radium 31 

Why Ships Break in Two 24 

Will They Prevent Him froin Firing the 

Gun? (Cartoon) 19 

Wilson, Mrs. Woodrow, Death of 48 

Wilson, William B., "Risen F^rom the 

Ranks" 11 

Wilson, W. B. (Sec'y. of Labor), First 

Annual Report of 28 

Wireless for Lighthouses . . ; 2 

Wireless In Asia 29 

Wireless Time for All 22 

Wireless Worries Birds 20 



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Title No. Page 
Women and War (Poem by S. J. Dun- 
can-Clark) 50 2 

Wonder Workers "Solidarity" 19 8 

Wood Alcohol, Danger of 36 2 

Workmen's Compensation, Etc. (See 
Also Liability, Etc.) — 
.Married Men Under Compensation.... 24 7 

Payment Made Quickly 24 11 

State Insurance Pays 26 2 

Liability or Compensation? (W'ashing- 

ton State Decision) 7 7 

Injuries Reported in California 9 12 

.Awards Made in Ohio 9 12 

California Compensation Law, .Analy- 
sis of 27 7 

Premium Payable by Employers (De- 
cision of (Talifornia Commission)... 27 12 

Ivliniinating the Lawyers 32 7 

California State Insurance 37 2 

Wisconsin, Payments in 38 12 

California Report on Industrial .Acci- 
dents 46 7 

Compensation Tabulated 46 8 

Success of State Insurance in Cali- 
fornia 47 9 

Comparative Compensation Premiums 50 12 

Two Kinds of Wars 51 6 

World, End of the 16 8 

World's Commerce Carriers 49 2 

Worthy of Emulation 14 6 

Women's Trade-Union League 2 1 

Wrecks of 1912 2 10 

W'recks That Taught Lessons 45 2 

Wrecks— 

"A-7" (British Submarine) 21 14 

Acillia 20-14; 24-5 

Ada 39 5 

.Admiral Sampson 51 5 

Alice 45 5 

Aloha 16-5; 17-5 

.Amaranth 4-5; 5-5 

.Americana 4-5; 5-5 

Argo 30 5 

.Armenia 36 5 

Battle Abbey 18 5 

Benjamin Noble 35 14 

Berkes 4 12 

Calypso 45 15 

Centennial 9 5 

Cervona 17 14 

Charlemagne Tower, Jr 27-14; 42-15 

Charles Buckley 33 14 

Cienfuegas 47 14 

Clarence H. Venner 47 14 

Cobequid 23 14 

Columbian 35-14; 36-6; 38-9 

County of Devon 44 6 

Curacao 2-5; 12-5; 25-5; 32-5; 39-5; 47-5 

Dalgonar 15-5; 39-5 

El Dorado 2-5; 13-5; 16-5; 17-5 

Elvira 10 5 

Empress of Ireland 38-6, 

7; 39-6; 40-1. 15; 41-2; 45-2, 6, 14; 46-7-. 47-7 

Evadne 5 12 

F;. M. Slade 26 5 

Fremont 5 5 

Gayhead 43-5; 44-5; 46-5 

Gerard C. Tobey 44 5 

Glenesslin 6-5 ; 8-5 

Halifax 19, 42-14 

Harold C. Beecher 47 14 

Henry P. Havens 9 14 

laqua 3 5 

Ingelbjorg 43 14 

Inveravon 21 5 

Jeanie 16-5; 20-5; 37-5 

J. H. Lunsman 

....9-5; 16-5; 21-5; 23-5; 29-5; 31-5; 35-5 

Jiquilisco 38 14 

Juanita 17 14 

Julia A. Trubel 29 14 

Kauai 16 S 

Lake Manitoba 2 12 

Luella 34 5 

Maine 42 14 

Margrethe 17 14 

Mary Sachs 13 5 

Maui 29 5 

Mendoza 46 14 

Merced 6-5; 8-5 

Mimi 21 5 

Monroe-Nantucket 21-7, 

14; 23-13; 26-7; 33-14; 36-1; 39-1; 49-14; 50-14 

Montana 34 5 

New Foundland 31-15; 35-8 

Nokomis 44 5 

Oklahoma 19-8; 22-14 

Paramita 36-7; 37-5; 38-5 

Pathfinder 24 5 

Penn 5 13 

Polaris 19-5; 20-S 

Pomo (Water-logged) 17-6; 18-5 

Potomac 39-15; 43-14 

Ragna 47 14 

Red Wing 21 5 

Robert Searles 8 5 

Roanoke 5 7 

Scotia 52 5 

Sainte .Anne 33 14 

Santa Cruz 3 5 

Southern Cross 31-15; 32-15; 35-8 

State of California 2-5; 4-5 

St. Paul 29 14 

Thomas R. Wooley 17 14 

"Titanic" Mystery 4 9 

Transit 3-5; 32-6 

Turrethill 51 14 

Tyrone 4 5 

Volturno 6-6, 7; 23-14; 24-4; 29-14 

Wasp 4 5 

W. H. Dimond 24 5 

William Jamieson 36 14 

Zulia 18 14 

Wright, Justice, on Grill 27-3; 31-3; 33-13 

Y 
"Yankee Swanson," .A Revie.w 9 7 



STATE . 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVII, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 1913. 



Whole No. 2243. 



ORGANIZED LABOR IN CANADA. 



The second annual report on Labor Organiza- 
tion in Canada, covering the calendar year 1912, 
and containing 160 pages, has just been issued 
by the Department of Labor. The report fol- 
lows closely on the lines of its predecessor, with 
some additional features, giving a general re- 
view of the activities of the trade-union move- 
ment in Canada during 1912. 

From the introductory pages it is noted that 
trade-union membership, in common with other 
activities of industrial life in Canada, increased 
considerably during the year 1912. At tbe end 
of 1911 the meniljersliip was reported at 133,132; 
at the close of 1912 it stood at 160,120. This 
membership, it may be noted, is contained in 
1,883 local trade union organizations. The local 
bodies are affiliated to larger central organiza- 
tions, save in twenty-eight instances where the 
unions are local and independent. 

After referring to the natural tendency to 
internationalism in trade unionism, the report 
shows that there are in all 148 international 
trade union organizations operating in North 
America, 99 of which have under their juris- 
diction one or more local branches in Canada. 
Some attention is given to new movements 
in labor organization, known respectively as In- 
dustrial Unionism and Syndicalism. The first- 
named, which has been endorsed by the Trades 
and Labor Congress of Canada, looks to the 
closer federation or actual consolidation of all 
craft unions. Syndicalism, represented by the 
Industrial Workers of the World, and which has 
already figured in extensive industrial struggles 
in Canada, is opposed to old-line trade unionism, 
and is described as "frankly revoldtionary" in 
character, a statement which seems to be fully 
borne out by the preamble of the I. W. W. 
constitution. In addition to the statistics given, 
the report contains a complete list of all known 
international central bodies, together with the 
name and address of the secretary; also federa- 
tions of local unions, district councils, trades 
and labor councils, and local unions, with 
the names and addresses of the presidents and 
secretaries for the year 1913. 

Trade Union Membership in 1912. 

The tables submitted in the report show that 
there are 136,389 wage-earners in Canada who 
are members of international organizations. 
These are contained in 1,638 local branches. This 
is an increase of 107 locals and 16,974 members 
over the figures reported for 1911. Of Canadian 
central organizations there are 217 local 
branches with a total reported membership of 
15.616, a slight increase for the year. In ad- 
dition there are 28 independent bodies, of which 
16 report a membership of 8,115, thus bringing 
the total membership reported in the 1,883 
local branches and independent trade-union 
organizations of all types in Canada at the 
close of the year to 160,120. The total member- 
ship reported for 1911 was 133,132, contained 
in 1,741 local and independent bodies. 

An analysis of the relative strength of or- 
ganized labor and the number of wage earners 
in Canada, which is placed at 1,300,000, reveals 
the fact that a large number of unskilled labor- 
ers, approximately 88 per cent, of the whole, 
remain untouched by organizations. It is, how- 
ever, pointed out that the total of 160,120 union 
members in Canada "will be, no doubt, found 



to include the large majority of effective mem- 
bers of skilled crafts of the Dominion." 

Extent of Organization in Provinces. 

The report shows that there are in all 1,883 
local unions in Canada. Of these, 1,638 are 
International locals. 680 of which are in the 
Province of Ontario, 230 in British Columbia, 
194 in Quebec, 144 in Alberta, 130 in Manitoba, 
106 in Saskatchewan, 72 in each Nova Scotia 
and New Brunswick, and 3 in Prince Edward 
Island. There are 217 trade union locals of a 
non-international character, chartered by Canar 
dian central bodies, divided among the various 
provinces as follows: Ontario, 67; Nova Scotia, 
64; Quebec, 32; British Columbia, 17; New 
Brunswick, 11; Manitoba, 9; Saskatchewan and 
Alberta, 7 each, and Prince Edward Island, 3. 
Of the remaining 28 unaffiliated or independent 
bodies, Quebec has 15; Ontario, 5; British Co- 
lumbia and Prince Edward Island, 3 each; Al- 
berta and Nova Scotia, 1 each. 

Membership in Canadian Cities. 

The report gives the name of every locality 
in Canada in which one or more union branches 
exist, together with the number of unions re- 
porting membership and the number of mem- 
bers reported as belonging to the locals. Of 
the 1,883 locals recorded, 1,051 furnished definite 
information as to officers and membership, the 
membership thus reported being 121,737. About 
500 locals supplied the names of their officers; 
the remainder forwarded no information. The 
following table in the report gives the names of 
22 cities which include 979 of the 1,883 local 
unions in the Dominion, the list not extending 
to cities having 20 locals or fewer: 

Number Number of Number 

of Unions of 

Unions reporting members 

in member- reported. 
Locality. ship. 

Toronto 120 78 16,415 

Montreal 107 59 15,562 

Winnipeg 82 50 7,518 

Vancouver 80 39 8,011 

Hamilton SO 33 3,166 

Ottawa SO 32 2,765 

Victoria 46 30 3,287 

Calgary 42 24 3,281 

Quebec 41 20 4,419 

Edmonton 40 24 2,729 

London 38 27 2,350 

Fort William.... 32 16 983 

St. John. N.B.. .. 28 18 2,687 

St. Thomas 28 15 1,324 

Saskatoon 28 14 991 

Lcthbridge 27 14 l,t)96 

Halifax 25 11 1,387 

Port Arthur 25 12 6.33 

Brandon 24 17 1,118 

Nelson 23 16 1,028 

Moose Jaw 22 15 1,429 

Windsof 21 14 880 

Total 979 578 83,059 

The cities included in the above list furnished 
also more than one-half of the locals which 
reported their membership, and contain over 



51 per cent, of the entire trade-union member- 
ship in the Dominion. 

Trade Unions of the World. 
An interesting statement contained in the 
report shows the relative standing in trade 
unionism of the chief industrial nations, with 
figures indicating the percentage of trade- 
union membership to population in the case of 
each country as follows: 

Per Cent, 
of Union 
Union Popu- Member- 
Country, membership lation. ship to 

total 
Population 

Great Britain 3,010,347 45,365,599 6.066 

France 1,029,238 39,601,509 2.025 

Belgium 92,735 7,516,7.30 1.012 

The Netherlands 153,689 5,945,155 2.025 

Denmark 128,224 2.757,076 2.025 

Sweden 116,500 5.521,943 4.046 

Norway 53,830 2,391,782 2.021 

Finland 19,640 3,120,264 2.022 

Germany 3,061 ,002 64,903,423 4.047 

Austria 496,263 28,.321,088 1.017 

Bosnia-Herzegovina . 5,587 1,898,044 .002 

Croatia-Slavonia 8,504 2,416,300 .003 

Hungary 95,180 20,840,678 .004 

Servia 8,337 2,911,701 .002 

Roumania 6,000 6,966,000 .0008 

Switzerland 78,1 19 3,741,971 .02 

Italy 709,943 34,687,000 .02 

Spain 80,000 19,588,688 .004 

United States 2,282,361 91,972,266 2.481 

Canada 160.120 7.204,527 2.02 

According to the foregoing table, Germany 
leads all countries in actual membership in 
trade unionism. Great Britain being second and 
the United States third. Great Britain is, how- 
ever, easily the most highly unionized country 
in the list. The figures for Canada are small 
beside those for the great industrial countries, 
and allowing for difference of population the 
Canadian figures remain relatively small. Bel- 
gium and Holland are two industrial countries 
with a population fairly comparable in number 
with that of Canada. Belgium with a slightly 
larger population has a third less of organized 
union membership; Holland with a million 
fewer people has almost an equal union mem- 
bership with Canada. The Australasian Do- 
minions are not mentioned in the report of the 
International Secretariat of national trade- 
union centers, and complete information is not 
available to the compilers of this report. It is 
believed, however, that the percentages of union- 
ized labor are very much larger in those Do- 
minion than elsewhere in the world. 

Beneficiary Sj^tems of Unionism. 

.'\ chapter of the report is devoted to a 
discussion of the beneficiary systems of trades 
unionism. Not all the unions have reported 
on this subject, but the information collected 
shows the wide and important influence which 
organized labor of North America plays in this 
d''i;artment of industrial life. The bcnoficiary 
expenditiires (jf .s^xf^^ejgKt of_ the international 
cciUriil ir.'ide' ui^on, .or.gah'izations operating in 
(C6''»iinli>d"o'ri''Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FALLACIES OF I. W. W. 



What a Cod-send il would be to the 
working-class if every last workingman 
were organized and firmly united with 
every other worker in one big union ! That 
has been the dream of ages. The Knights 
of Labor was an ef^'ort to realize that dream 
and some day we hope and believe this 
dream will come true. Every member of 
organized labor who grasps the breadth ot 
the labor movement hopes that this day 
may come soon, but those who have any 
great amount of knowledge about history 
and the growth and development of organ- 
ized labor and who understand the state of 
mind existing among the majority of the 
workers who actually inhabit this world 
to-day realize that this desired goal can 
not be reached in a hurry. 

Every now and then enthusiasts under- 
take to lead the working-class out of the 
wilderness by a short-cut route. During 
recent years \vc have had the T. W. W. 
boasting about their one big union and the 
wonders which it would perform. I'n- 
fortunately for the L W. W. enthusiasts 
their union never has been very big and 
their repeated failures during the present 
year to make good in their various at- 
tetnpls to start something for who.se suc- 
cess they could claim credit is reacting 
and they must now shoulder the blame ior 
the failures. Just now the I. \\\ \V. is 
rent with dissensions. These have been 
brewing for months and now they have 
reached such an acute point as to find ex- 
pression in their various papers. 

The one big union of the L W. W. is in 
an exceedingly critical condition. Long 
before it has reached any size to speak 
of it seems to be going to pieces just as 
the L W. W. of eight years ago split into 
fragments that have never succeeded in 
getting together since. 

In this connection the question naturally 
arises: How would it be possible for 
these boisterous enthusiasts to hold one 
big union together if they can not hold a 
little one together. The I. W. W. has had 
eight years in which to grow and although 
its present papers fail to publish any re- 
port of finances, membership or anything 
else that would indicate its present actual 
size it is certain that the I. W. W. to-day 
is smaller than it was during 1905 when 
it was formed. It is easy to talk aboul 
one big union, but when it comes to actual- 
ly realizing this desired goal it will take 
a whole lot more than noise to bring it 
about. It will take far more persistent 
and patient effort, far more intelligence 
and education, far more discipline and 
organization than the average I. W. W. 
enthusiast ever dreamed of. His one big 
union grew rapidly in his mind, but the 
methods used to bring it about are causing 
its disruption. 

"The more haste the less speed," is a 
saying that is generally filled with truth 
when applied to the man who is in a stew 
of a hurry. The same can be said to the 
impatient ones in the labor movement who 
want to move faster than the general move- 
ment will move. It applies with excep- 
tional force to the enthusiasts of the I. W. 
W. of to-day. They have talked fervently 
of their one big union and before they 
are eight years old they have repeatedly 
been rent into factions. Their organization 
seems to be in a .bad. vv^y^'. ajncLit. rejii^in^^ 
to be seen what/wilj lliliiftev Mi^i. : .v. , 

In the meantime the American Federa- 



tion of Labor has increased its member- 
ship more than 300,000 during the last 
twelve months. — Eureka Labor News. 



BY THE WAY. 



Political vs. Direct Action. 

iirother, what do you e.xpect to accom- 
plish with your "direct-action-and-to-hell- 
with-])olitics" tactics? Don't you know 
that the other side can give you cards and 
spades, and still beat you at the game of 
"direct action," hands down? Why 
shouldn't they? They are in more or less 
direct control of the government, the navy, 
the army, the militia, the police, the courts, 
the press, the pulpit, etc. .\bove all, they 
are in full control of the natural resources 
< f the country, and most of the public 
utilities. That gives them the sinews of 
war, which is everything in warfare. Truly 
a formidable array of forces to buck up 
against with such puny batteries of "direct 
action" as you could bring to bear on 
them ! 

.\o, friend: "direct action" is not likely 
to get you anything much besides a 
broken head or a term in jail. The devil 
must be beaten with his own weapons. 
.\nd, as you know, the devil of capitalism 
is particularly strong on "law and order." 
"constitutional methods," and that sort of 
thing. That's it — "the constitution," "law 
and order," etc. — those are the weapons 
we must use if we would down him. Let's 
get together, a majority of us, and vote 
him out of existence so completely that 
he'll never be able to come back. So long 
as we do it in accordance with "constitu- 
tional methods," and are punctilious stick- 
lers for "law and order," he can have no 
possible kick coming. Serving a man with 
a dose of his own medicine estops him 
forthwith from arguing against the pro- 
ceeding. Yes, brother; political action 
has "direct action" beaten forty-'leven dif- 
ferent ways from the jack as a weapon 
against capitalism. 

Just do a little figuring, and the thing 
will be plain to you. Suppose, for in- 
stance, that a majority of the workers were 
both ready and willing to go in for "direct 
action," what could they do if a substan- 
tial minority elected to remain at work for 
the masters? On the other hand, a bare 
plurality of the voters can capture the 
whole machinery t)f the government in na- 
tion. State, county or city. .A bare ma- 
jority of them could, if they so chose, 
totally remodel our whole industrial and 
economic structure. And nary a caiMtalistic 
exponent of "law and order" could say 
them nay on "constitutional grounds." 
Now, what do you know about that, Broth- 
er Direct-.Actionist ? 



Turn and turn about is fair play. John 
I). Rockefeller's pile was built for him by 
underi)ai(l and long-houred labor. Now 
the old gentleman has become so fidgety 
and restless that he can't quit work even 
on Labor Day. Poor man! It must be 
fierce this thing of having to live up to a 
solemn reputation of being "a rosebush in 
the Lord's garden." 



What shall it profit a man to be a "sov- 
ereign citizen" of a great republic if the 
subjects of a measly monarchy can go him 
one better on the score of sovereignty? 
Here, for instance, are the people of Nor- 



way, more power to 'em, who have gone 
and deprived their king of the veto power. 
What d'you know about that, eh? After 
this his gracious majesty will be "re- 
quested" to sign all bills passed by the 
Storthing. If he refuses to sign a bill it 
will become law anyway. \\'hich makes 
the king just an anointed rubber stamp. 
.All the same it's going some in the line 
of progre.s.>ivism. Maybe along in V^50 
or thereabouts we'll catch up with the Nor- 
wegians and do our own vetoing as well 
as law-making. 



Machine-Made Idleness. 
I'nder the heading "How Machines Mul- 
tiply Labor Production" the August issue 
of Po])ular Mechanics prints the following: 

.\iilc(l by niacliiiuTv, it appears, according tvi 
statistics gatluTcd by the Bureau of Labor, that 
4,50;j.()(K) men turn out a product which would 
require proximately 40,000.t){)n if pro<luccd by 
hand. The advantage derived from machinery 
in the United States is about twice as great as 
tliat in Europe, so that the actual population of 
the United States is equal in productive power 
to ISn.OOO.OnO Europeans. 

These figures preach an eloquent sernn)n. 
They tell as plainly as figures can that 
we of today are face to face with an eco- 
ncniic situation which was never before 
known in the world's history. The situa- 
tion in brief is this: Skilled labor is rapid- 
ly tlwindling toward the vanishing point. 
L'nskilled labor is increasing beyond all 
bonds within which it cait be profitably 
cmijloyed imder e.xisting industrial condi- 
tions. Result, unemployment on a stag- 
gering scale. 

^'es, indeed ; what shall it profit a nation 
to enjoy an "advantage derived from ma- 
chinery about twice as great as 
that in Plurope" if the net result is simply 
a corresponding increase of involuntary 
idleness and poverty? What's the answer 
do you suppose? Well, to my way of 
thinking it is this: Let's socialize our in- 
dustries. Then "the advantage derived 
from machinery" employed in the industries 
would redound to the benefit of all, in exact 
proportion to the quota of labor contributed 
to the general fund by each. That would 
automatically end the profit system by 
making the only incentive to production 
that of use. And with the ending of the 
profit .system would come quite naturally 
the ending of its logical concomitant, in- 
voluntary poverty. For as long as there 
remained one man in the community with 
legitimate wants to be ministered to, pro- 
duction would, perforce, be carried on to 
that extent. In short, the production of 
wealth would then have the same relation 
to society as the windmill pump has to its 
annexed water tank. As you know, when 
the tank is full the pump automatically 
stops, but starts up again as soon as there 
is the least shortage of water. 

.\nd so with socialized industries. The 
production of wealth would continually be 
kept at the top level. Only when the 
wants of everyone had been satisfied would 
there be anything like a general cessation 
t)f work. Which would be more like a gen- 
eral holiday than anything else ; for it 
surely would be no hardship to be out of 
work when you lacked for nothing. 



Enthusiasm and sincerity is a hard team 
L) beat even when enlisted in a fool cause. 



'Tis strange such difi'rence there should 
be 'twixt "honest graft" and larceny! 

El Tuerto 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



One Thousand Longshoremen Strike. 

One thousand longshoremen employed 
at the Hamhurg-American line piers struck, 
and, as a result, work is at a standstill on 
the company's piers in Hoboken, where 
tlie President Grant, the President Lincoln, 
and the Kaiserin Auguste Victoria are 
moored. A committee of the strikers called 
upon Captain Hans Jarka, the Hamburg- 
American line's sperintendent of piers, and 
he did his best to prevail upon the men 
to go back to work pending a settlement 
of their demands. This the committee re- 
fused to agree to, and at a meeting held 
recently the strikers voted to stay out until 
the company met their terms. The trouble 
started when the Hamburg-American line 
appointed Captain Jarka superintendent of 
its piers. Before his advent the "brass 
check system" prevailed, and this was satis- 
factory to the longshoremen, as it in- 
sured them steady work. Under the brass 
system every longshoreman had a check, 
and the men were divided into classes 
of 100 each. The men longest in the 
company's employ, whose numbers ran 
from 1 to 100, were the first engaged. 
Then, if more men were needed, those 
longshoremen whose numbers ran from 100 
to 200 were called on. This system of 
seniority applied throughout the list of 
1,000 employes. But the men assert that 
Captain Jarka brought with him from 
Brooklyn his old stevedore, William 
Schmidt, and made him head stevedore on 
the ] iamburg-American piers. Schmidt did 
away with the check system, and when 
he wanted longshoremen he sent out into 
the street and picked up the men he 
wanted, instead of sending for the old 
longshoremen by classes. The strikers de- 
mand a return to the check system. 

Ed. Note : According to late advices the 
longshoremen have returned to work with 
demands practically granted. 



Constabulary's Brutality. 

Serious rioting was the outcome of an 
attempt to break up a strike of iron mold- 
ers in the several plants at Erie, Pa., which 
has been dragging along s'nce December 
last. Non-union men were brought in, and 
this inflamed the strikers and their sympa- 
thizers. The sheriff and the police had 
not exhausted all of their means before 
they appealed to Governor Tener to send 
the State constabulary, and a protest was 
made to him by the labor leaders against 
such action, and, according to the under- 
standing reached, promises were made 
through the Governor's representative that 
the constabulary would not be sent to Erie 
until an investigation had been made, or 
that conditions become so serious that 
such action would be necessary. Despite 
the promise of the Governor, two troops 
of the State constabulary were dispatched 
immediately to the city. Not long after 
they had taken charge of the situation 
one of their number struck a striker over 
the head with the butt of his rifle, injur- 
ing him quite seriously. Previous to the 
assault no efifort had been made to ar- 
rest the alleged offender, nor had any 
resistance been made on the part of any 
of the strikers to the orders issued by 



the members of the troopers. Following 
this action, the strikers became very much 
excited, and the result was a clash be- 
tween the two, in which the troopers rode 
roughly over the men with their horses. 
As a result of this action, one State trooper 
was wounded and three strikers and sympa- 
thizers are now in the hospital and a 
score of others were more or less injured. 
The streets of the city were crowded at the 
time the disturbance occurred, and it is 
fortunate that nothing more serious re- 
sulted, as the citizens generally are very 
much incensed at the manner in which 
the constabulary was hurried to the scene. 
There was serious talk of calling a general 
strike to assist the molders, announcement 
to that effect appearing in the local papers. 
The matter, however, was seriously de- 
bated at a special meeting of the Central 
Labor Union and the leaders of the strike. 
A decision was finally reached at the tu-- 
gcnt re(|uest of the representatives of the 
molders that the interests of that organiza- 
tion would I)e best served by not calling 
a general strike, and it was finally de- 
termined not to do so. The situation is 
still critical and probably will remain so 
as long as the constabulary is on the 
scene, as their presence in various places 
of the State where difficulties have existed 
heretofore has promoted trouble by their 
extremely arbitrary and ill-considered ac- 
tion. The men arc more determined than 
ever to continue the struggle until success- 
ful results are obtained. 



Molders Progress. 

The report of the officers of the Inter- 
national Holders' Union shows the follow- 
ing progress in many sections of the LTni- 
ted States: 

Continued success was experienced dur- 
ing the month of June in securing substan- 
tial advances in wages and other improved 
conditions for our members through the 
peaceful methods of conferences with the 
foundrymen. The members of No. 459, 
\\'aterloo, Iowa, have secured a $3..^0 min- 
imum for a nine-hour day and a basic 
wage rate of $4..S0 for piece workers. Two 
of the foundries under the jurisdiction of 
No. 102, Waltham, Mass., have granted 
a $3.25 minimum flat for a nine-hour day; 
this rate to be raised to $3.35 January 1, 
1914. The previous minimum was $3.00. 
The members of No. 305, Plainfield, N. J., 
have established a minimum of $3.50 for a 
nine-hour day, or its equivalent. In the 
shops operating under an 8j/2-hour day the 
rate will be $3.50 at these hours on Sep- 
tember 16, this year. An agreement es- 
tablishing a flat minimum of $3.60 for a 
nine-hour day has been reached with the 
foundrymen of Omaha, Hastings, Lincoln, 
and Fremont, Neb., and Council Bluffs, 
Iowa, the agreement being signed with the 
Nebraska Foundrymen's Association. This 
is an advance of 35 cents per day to core- 
makers and 30 cents to molders. A mini- 
nuiin of $3.15 for coremakers and $3.50 
for molders for a nine-hour day has been 
established in Minneapolis, Minn. 'i'his 
is an advance of 25 cents per day on the 
minimum. Two shops, employing ai)proxi- 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

Atlantic District 

Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Association, lyiA 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 South St., New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St., New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., BuflFalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 84 Embarcadero, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 42 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42, Seattle. 
Wash. 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 10 
Embarcadero, San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns. Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London, E., 
England. 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union. 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland BIdgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St Pieter- 
soliet 8. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, Paris, 33, rue 
Grange aux-Belles. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bond. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros, og Fyrboder Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavo^atori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza L. Marzellino 6-2. Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehr.-'ar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Ocsterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
(Barceloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




A meeting of 1200 members of the 
federated trade unions at Pretoria 
carried a motion requesting the Im- 
perial Government to recall Viscount 
Gladstone over his action in connec- 
tion with the strike. 

The Governor of Galicia, a crown 
land of Austria-Hungary, has de- 
termined to stop the emigration of 
adults from his country to the Uni- 
ted States and Canada. He ordered 
the police to arrest all male per- 
sons between the ages of 18 and 36, 
and liable for military service, who 
attempt to leave the country, and to 
send them to their homes. 

For some years the co-operative- 
societies in British India have ?'• 
rapidly developed that the govern 
nient found it necessary to establish 
a special registry office in every 
province for co-operative societies. 
The Governors and Ministers have 
taken part in many of the confer- 
ences which have recently taken 
place for the furthering of the co- 
operative movement. 

An agreement has been reached 
by the employers' association and the 
brass workers and metal mechanics 
at Birmingham, Eng., by which 
wages have been increased by rates 
ranging from 9d. (18 cents) to 2s. 
6d. (61 cents). The wages are for a 
week of 54 hours and affect some 
4,000 men. They do not apply to the 
brass casters, whose wages were in- 
creased some eighteen months ago. 

Sympathizing with 11,000 painters 
who struck as a protest against the 
employment of non-union men, the 
electricians of the British Admiralty 
at London walked out on August 30. 
More than 700 electricians in the 
general postoffice there resolved to 
strike until the non-union painters 
are discharged. The strike will cut 
off power and lights, tying up tlie 
mail hoists and pneumatic tubes. 

Another 400 employes of the print- 
ing bureau at Ottawa, Canada, have 
been given a substantial increase in 
wages, dating from June 1 of this 
year. The 400 includes stereotypers, 
compositors, bookbinders, pressmen, 
and press feeders, and the increase, 
dating from June 1, will be paid to 
the men as soon as the accounting 
clerks of the bureau get the amounts 
made up. Compositors, bookbinders, 
and stereotypers will now draw $20 
per week, pressmen, $21, and feeders, 
$15. This is an increase ranging 
from 50 cents to $1 per week. 

Co-operation will be the basis of 
the ideal State of the future, ac- 
cording to Earl Grey, who addressed 
the recent Congress of the Interna- 
tional Co-operative Alliance at Glas- 
gow. In an enthusiastic inaugural 
address to the 600 delegates present, 
who represented 20,000,000 members 
of co-operative societies in America 
and Europe, Lord Grey painted a 
picture of the future co-operative in- 
ternational commonwealth, which, he 
said, would one day be co-equal and 
co-e.xtensive with the whole of the 
civilized world. It meant, he said, 
the elimination of the parasitic mid- 
dleman and consequently a reduction 
in the cost of living. Co-operation, 
he said, showed how the warring 
forces of labor and capital could be 
reconciled, and would put an end to 
the present industrial organization, 
which was responsible for much of 
the existing selfishness, suspicion, 
hatred, and consequent inefficiency, 
with their resultant sequels — poverty 
and discontent. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... saN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

437 F-ROINT STRiJET SAIN PEDRO 




S. G. SWANSON 

For High Class 

Union Label Tailoring 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to postoffice 

Los Angeles "Waterfront" 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

W* Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



This is to certify that on the 27th 
day of February, 1911, one Mathias 
Lagnian, then nineteen years of age, 
was a seaman on board the S. S. 
"Paloma," Cuban flag; that when said 
vessel was lying at anchor in the 
Port of Cabarian, P. R., at about 8 
o'clock in the evening, Lagman, who 
had been working with other men at 
painting, was walking between decks 
in the dark, when he fell through 
hatch No. 4, which had been left un- 
covered. He was picked up in the 
hold and it was found that he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. This 
young man was subsequently taken 
to Russia, where his mother, who is 
very poor, is taking care of him. 

It is believed that the owners were 
negligent in failing to have the hatch 
covered, and in failing to have or 
furnish proper lighting for the 'tween 
decks at the point where Lagman 
fell. If these facts can be proven, 
some relief might be obtained for this 
unfortunate boy. 

The following are the men who 
signed on the articles with Lagman, 
and who had been working with said 
Lagman : 

C. Jones, C. J. Johnson, F. Johan, 
M. Lanhard, E. Randal, W. Paulson. 

Any seaman who will locate these 
men or send their addresses to the 
Legal Aid Society, No. 1 Broadway, 
New York City, will be doing a 
great favor to said sailor, and to 
S. B. .Axtell, attorney-in-charge. 

For similar reasons we desire to 
communicate with the following men 
who were members of the crew of 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealer, m 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and AJl San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Ajrents 

Harbor Steam I>aundry 

ALEX. K.\NE C. A. BRUCE 

WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

Don't forget the 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 
Light and ventilation perfect. 
Cool and pleasant at all seasons. 



CIGARS TOBACCO SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 
Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address, 
Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Adolf Theining, a native of Van- 
nersborg, Sweden, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



NOTICE. 
Any sailor or fireman having bag- 
gage stored with John Krehmke, 407 
Drumm St., will please call on Mrs. 
John Krehmke, 1209 Central Ave., 
Alameda. Baggage to be kept 60 
days from to-day, then sold to de- 
fray expenses. 

MRS. JOHN KREHMKE, 
1209 Central Ave. (Martin Station), 
Alameda. 



the "Lyman M. Law" in October, 
1911, when Edward S. Tennberg was 
severely injured on the trip between 
Boston and Norfolk: 

Adolph Dittmer. John Olson, Har- 
old Herman, Charles Newberg, James 
J. Kelly. 



San Pedro Letter Liat. 

Anderson, Edw. -1739Kroman, M. 

Anderson, Marius Kallas, M. 

.\nilersen, Morris lAng, C. 

.\nilerson. Gust Lindberg, Billy 
Anderson, W. -1630 Lewis. George 

Andersen, A. -164.5 Leideker, C. 

Allen, August Lauritson, George 

Andersen, A. P. Lindeberg, Ernest 

.\nnell, Albert I..enike, Richard 

Anderson, Ernst Lewet. Frenrlile 

.Anderson, David Lindernian. Gust 
.\nderson, HemmlndLlndgren. Gust 

Anderson, Lewis Lister, W. 

.Anderson, Patrick Livingston, F. 

-Andersen, P. Loining, Herman 

Anderson, Sam I..utzen. W. 

.Anderson. Soren Mayer, W. 

Rringsund. Harald Makinen, Oskar 

nehrsin, Jacob Maatta, John 

r.rrgh, Borge MouI.ts. Nick 

Hcnstsson, C. -1924 Merleult, Gaston 

Benson, Helge Mlckelsson, A. -1105 

Berlnis, Emil Miller, John 

Huohtman, F. Mohle, N. S. 

Blakstad, Ed. Nichols, Walter 

Cristensen, H. . .elsen, Julius 

-1366 Nelson, Ernest 

Casaslo, Joe Nelson, Hans 

Carlsson, Aksel Olsen, Ferdinand 

-1J20 Ol.'sen, Oswald 

Chifpman, Wealie Olsen, W. 

Collberg. C. Ogilvie. Wm. 

Doyle, W. Olsen, Sckutar 

1 lischler, Peter Owen, Fred 

Dougal, A. Olsen, Marius 

I )avidson, W. Olsen, Olav 

nreger. Jack Olsen, Nick 

Kkliulm, F. Pekman, Ernest 

lOckart. T. G. Peterson, Osrar 

lOriksson. C. -333 (Reg. Letter) 

F.Trrell, Henry Persson, HJalmar 

FUbe, Fritz Repson, E. 

Falbom, Richard Rajala, Wictor 

Felsch, Charley Reshe, G. H. 

Flanagan, Jack Sandblom. Konrad 

Forjen.sen. Olaf Saniuelson, Wivlor 

ilraiitley, Mr. .Sandstrom, O. H. 

Gutnian. Jack -ISIO 

Croiiliiiid, Oskar Simpson, L. O. 

-411 Smith. ■William 

I lolnistr.im. Fritz Schroeder, Hans 

Iljorth, Knut Sanne. Rudolph 

Ilausman, Mr. Sanders, Swedrup 

Hansen, C. Sevardseh. E. 

Hansen. Pete -1877 Sievers, G. P. 

Hass, James Smith, H. D. -2015 

Halvorsen, O. Staar. Chas. -2601 

Hansen, Herald Svmdqulst, E. Au?. 

Hansen, Johannes Thogensen. Pedir 

Hansen, Martin H. Thorsen, Joe 

Heknius, Oskar Torgersen. .\nton 

llintza, Yrjo T^lappa, Kostl 

llnltsman, Harry Warkala, J. 

Joliansson, J. -2266 Wllemson, H. 

Jorgensen. Fred Willis. F. S. 

.Iinsen. Jens B. WIrtanen. Charles 

Johansson, Fritz W. Werner. Paul 

Jonasson, O. M. Wene, K. J. 

.lohansen. Walter Zorning, Arthur 

.Fensson, John -2203 Zoe, F. 

Johnson, Ben Packages and 

Johnson, Fred Photos. 

Johnson, Andrew Anderson, Hilding 

Kumlander. Emll Kroman. M. 

Kalnin. E. Larsen, James C.hr. 

KUihn. K. Nordman, John 



Honolulu, H. T. 



K. 



.Albrect, Chas. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, M. C. 
Andowety, H. 
Anderson, E. 
Anderson, C. E. 
Anderson, E. 
Anderson, A. 
Herthele, M. 
Baker, M. 
Bode, W. 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, A. 
Christensen, A. 
Cl.Tusen, J. 
Colbert. M. J. 
Douglas, G. A. 
Edgeston. C. J. 
Elilert, An. 
Eaton, Neva I. 
Glnaorniither, C. 
Gordon, James 
Hansen, Pet. 
Haralsen, W. 
Hanson, Jorg. 
Hansen, Christ. 
Haven, Francis 
Hevaroso, H. B. 
Hapstad, Sigurd 
Irwin. Robert 
Ivans, Carl 
Trike, Willie 
Jensen, Hans 



K.arlson, Hans 
Karlsen, Oskar 
Kjassgaard, Hans 
Langer, Robert 
Laymbrag, H. 
Linllanen, Ernest 
Lindberg, T. 
Ludwigsen, Arne 
Marx, Albert 
Machado. H. 
Mafo, E. S. 
Methenen, E. K. 
Olander. Carl 
Olsen, J. H. 
Person, Edmond 
Pitsi'hkun. W. 
I'elusan. I >. E. 
Russell. W. 
Relnink, H. 
Rasmundsen, G. 
Silhus, W. 
Slan, C. 
Schiff, Ch. 
Soronsen, E. 
Suvert. H. 
Sjablom, G. 
Stenars, A. W. 
Salversen, S. 
Schates, A. 
Vilvot, J. 

Williamson. R. .4. 
Zornow, Herbert 



INFORM^VTION WANTED. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Albert Christensen, native of By- 
rum Laso, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco in 1910, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, H. C. Christensen, 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home, San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



k\ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Cuban sugar is now coming to Vancouver in 
larger quantities than Java sugar. In the past 
several months only one steamer has arrived 
from Java. 

Frank Stone, of Oakland, is constructing a 
large steam tug for the Standard Oil Company. 
The tug will be used for towing the company's 
barges and other craft on the bay. 

After a voyage of nearly seven months the 
schooner "W. H. Marston" arrived in the Co- 
lumbia River on September 11, fifty-seven 
days from Antofagasta, to load her second cargo 
of lumber of the year for the West Coast under 
charter to W. R. Grace & Co. 

The fleet of salmon vessels began to show 
lip at San Francisco on Friday night (Septem- 
ber 6) with the arrival of the ship "Indiana," 
Captain Thompson, and during the following 
day five more arrived. Tlie catch was remark- 
ably large this season, and each carrier brought 
a capacity cargo. 

The Japanese junk that crossed the Pacific 
with a load of Japanese and was picked up and 
towed to San Francisco from Point Arena last 
month, was sold at. public auction by United 
States Marshal George H. Burnham on Septem- 
ber 10. The junk was knocked down to A. J. 
Mogan for ,$159. 

Making better than the usual steamship time, 
the ship "Star of Alaska," Captain Halvorsen, 
of the Alaska Packers' fleet, arrived at San Fran- 
cisco during the past week, making the run in 
ten days from Chignik. The "Star" was former- 
ly the British ship "Balclutha." She brought 
26,480 cases of canned salmon. 

Alterations and repairs to the steamer "Port- 
land" will be made at the Craig shipyards, Long 
Beach, at a cost of nearly $40,000. The vessel 
will be so altered that grain may be carried 
in bulk. Bulkheads will be provided so that 
different varieties of grain may be carried. _ A 
power plant and electric elevator will be in- 
stalled. 

Exonerating Pilot Richie L. Pease from 
blame in the collision at Astoria, August 24, 
between the German bark "Thielbek" and the 
Norwegian steamer "Thode- Fagelund," local 
United States Inspectors of Steam Vessels F.d- 
wards and Fuller at Portland have closed that 
matter, as they have no jurisdiction over Pilot 
Nolan, who was piloting a foreign steamer. 

Official information relative to the trial tri]! 
of the electric collier "Jupiter" states that the 
llrst trial spin was successful, and that the 
electric drive engines worked well, de\'eloping 
.S,000 horsepower at 104 R. P. M. This was 
better than expected, and leads to the conclusion 
that the required 5,200 horsepower of the specifi- 
cations will be obtained with 110 R. P. M. 

Data just compiled by Major J. F. Mclndoc, 
corps of engineers, U. S. A., from the results 
of the recent survey made at the entrance to 
the Columbia River show an increase of two 
feet in depth over the annual soundings con- 
ducted in May. Major Mclndoe is of the opin- 
ion this increase will prove permanent, due to 
the action of the current as guided by the com- 
pleted jetty. 

Though the Coast lumber business is not 
improving very fast, sailing vessels continue to 
be chartered for ofF-shore shipments. Quite a 
number of charters were reported recently. 
.•\mong the latter were the schooner "Bain- 
bridge," Puget Sound to Australia; the schooner 
"Defiance," Grays Harbor to the west coast, 
and the schooner Stimson from Puget Sound to 
Santa Rosalia. 

Captain James Burrows Clift, a veteran .\nier- 
ican sailing ship master, died at Tacoma August 
26, age 68 years. He was born in Mystic, Conn., 
and went to sea when 14 years old. He retired 
in 1889 after twenty-six years at sea with but 
three months on shore. He made forty-nine 
voyages around Cape Horn in sailing vessels. 
His longest command was in the ship "William 
H. Starbuck." 

The Hamburg-American line will include .San 
Francisco as a port of call after the first of 
next year for its transpacific freight steamers 
"Brisgavia," "Uckermark," "Andalusia" and "Se- 
thonia," which ply between Hamburg and this 
coast via East Asiatic ports, although Portland 
will doubtless remain the terminal of the line 
for some time to come. H. H. Ebbey is the 
local agent for the new service. 

Following his decision to maintain and de- 
velop the Alare Island Navy Yard as a first- 
class naval establishment. Secretary Daniels 
awarded a contract to R. A. Perry for dredging 
a channel to the plant at a cost of $197,000, 
$.35,000 less than the lowest bid received several 
months ago. As this bid is less by $46,000 than 
the appropriation made by Congress for the 
improvement, which contemplated a channel 
only 400 feet in width, the Secretary will ask 
for authority to expend the balance of the ap- 
propriation in increasing the width to 600 feet. 

Flying the Red Cross flag at the masthead, 
to give greater protection in the work of 
rescuing refugees from ports on the west coast 
of Mexico than the American flag would give 
in ports that are hostile, the Army transport 
"Buford" sailed from San Francisco on Septem- 



ber 8 in charge of Charles Jenkinson, special 
representative of the State Department. For 
the first time a War Department vessel has been 
turned over to the command of the State 
Department, and Jenkinson has been rushing 
work to get away, seeing that proper medicines 
and stores were ordered and that the neces- 
sary hospital men and nurses, as well as soldier 
guards, were taken along for the four or six- 
weeks trip. 

Reports that the Falcon and Hope Islands 
of the Friendly group in the South Pacific had 
disappeared beneath the surface of the ocean in 
a hurricane were brought to San Francisco by 
Captain J. H. Trask of the steamer Sonoma, 
wiiich arrived from Australia during the past 
week. The islands were inhabited by natives 
and many white people. It is believed that the 
inundation caused wholesale loss of life. Captain 
Trask feels that the catastrophe will be a great 
menace to navigators, if the reports are true, 
for if the islands should be only a few feet 
under water new charts of the locality would 
be necessary. The news of the disappearance 
of the islands was brought to Australia, ac- 
cording to Captain Trask, by a steamer that 
traded between Australia and the Friendly Is- 
lands. Recent reports of earthquakes were 
noted by students in Australia. 

The steel ocean-going dredge "Col. P. S. 
Michie" was launched recently at Seattle, from 
the yards of her builders, the Seattle Con- 
struction & Dry Dock Co. The new vessel was 
christened by Eleanor M. Chittenden, daughter 
of General H. M. Chittenden, president of the 
.Seattle Port Commission. The "Col. P. S. 
Michie" is a twin screw vessel of great power. 
She is 244 feet long, 43 feet beam, 24 feet 
deep, and is of the central type. She will have 
a capacity of 1,000 cubic yards. When com- 
pleted and equipped, the new dredge will cost 
approximately $.350,000. She is to be used at 
Coos Bay, Oregon, first in Government harbor 
improvement work and later for channel mainte- 
nance. Her special work will be the deepen- 
ing of harbors on the Pacific Coast. 

The name "Constitution" may be given to the 
large steamer which is to be built soon by 
the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. The new 
vessel will be on the same lines as the "Con- 
gress," which is now on the way from Phila- 
delphia to .San I'Vancisco. The company has 
steamships called the "Governor," "President" 
and "Congress" and the name "Constitution" 
would carry out the idea followed in the chris- 
tening of the others. The "Congress" is due 
here October 2 and will go on the coast runs 
immediately. When the "Congress" is in service 
arrangements will be made to withdraw the 
"Governor" and then the "President" tempo- 
rarily for the installation of oil-burning ap- 
paratus. The "Congress" is an oil burner. The 
officials of the Pacific Coast Company report 
that the volume of passenger and freight busi- 
ness is increasing rapidly and that even with 
its increased facilities the company will be kept 
right at top speed all the time to try to handle 
the business. 

The whaling bark "Gay Head," Captain Por- 
ter, arrived at San Francisco on .\ugust 30. The 
owners hardly expected her for a month or 
two. The "Gay Head," which sailed from San 
Francisco on December 28 last, had a very suc- 
cessful season. There were eighteen whales 
captured and nothing in the way of smashed 
boats marred the taking of the leviathans. The 
bark was the only vessel to go up from here 
for the season in the Arctic, but if an experi- 
ment now on is crowned with success many of 
the old timers may get back into the harness 
next season. The "Gay Head" brought 1000 
barrels of sperm oil and ten barrels of whale 
"beef." There was nothing remarkable in the 
bringing of the oil, as that was the main ob- 
ject of the trips in the days gone by before 
petroleum wells became so plentiful. The ten 
barrels of "beef," each barrel with about 300 
pounds capacity, is something new in the way 
of whale product. Whalers themselves had 
often smacked their lips over a well-cooked 
whale steak, just as seal hunters have made 
many meals off choice slices of their prey with 
a great relish. The commercial prospects of 
either whale or seal had not been taken into 
consideration apparently. When the "Gay Head" 
went north in December it was arranged for 
3000 or 4000 pounds of the blubber to be salted 
down and brought here for experimental ex- 
ploitation. When four days out of this port 
Captain Porter took a peep into one of the 
"beef" barrels, and on arriving declared he had 
found it in fine shape. Along with the other 
men on the bark the skipper believes whale 
meat is destined to make a hit with the 
epicure. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an oflfi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor. California St., 
near Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; 

(Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



Headquarters: 
EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

1%A Lewis St., Bo.ston, Mass. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, I South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Cent! St. 
PHILADELPHTA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



CHICAGO, 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 



BUFFALO, N. T.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, C, 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. T., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, C, 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 10$ Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., ' 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 East Woodbrldge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
B.\Y CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 B. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 84 Embarcadero. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C, Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmulr, P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 61 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One ytar, by mail - |2.00 | Six months - - - 1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce aa second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
84 Embarcadero, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in tlie JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
pr.Tl interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 17, 1913. 



\OLl'MK TWENTY-SEVEN. 



With this issue the Coast Seamen'.s Jour- 
NAi, enters upon the twenty-seventh year of 
its life. For twenty-six years this paper has 
uninterruptedly espoused the cause of the 
toilers of the sea. There have been trying 
])erio(ls in the life of the Journal, but .so far 
neither hostile human agencies nor the ele- 
ments beyond control of man have been able 
to .suppress its voice for one single issue. 

When the first issue made its appearance — 
a little four-page sheet 12 by 18 — the editor 
frankly stated the case, as he saw it, in a 
prophetic Salutatory, from which we quote in 
l)art. as follows : 

With a feeling of n.itiiral i)ride, we* venture 
to present to the public this opening issue of the 
Coast Seamen's Journal — beyond a doubt the 
first newspaper that has ever been published ex- 
clusively in behalf of the myriads who live upon 
the watery part of this globe of ours, the sea- 
faring class. 

In taking this step, we do not lend ourselves 
to any delusion: we fully conceive the immensity 
of our task. Descendants, as we are, of the 
"House of Want," and the pupils of such grim 
teachers as extreme hardship and continuous 
toil, we have even now a woeful apprehension 
nf the scolding, cuffing and general ill-treatment 
which this offspring of ours is to receive, es- 
pecially at the hands of that class of parasites 
who have grown corpulent and lazy on the hard 
earnings, the ignorance and the proverbial gen- 
erosity of the Sailor. How they will hate its 
voice: how they will endeavor to stifle it; how 
they will employ each conceivable soothing 
charm to rock it to sleep again — for its voice, 
tiny and insignificant as it may seem, is a men- 
ace to their objects, a death-message to their 
very existence. . . . 

That results have fairly crowned the eflforts 
of this "tiny and insignificant" voice of pub- 
licity no one can deny. That a considerable 
portion of the "class of parasites" referred to 
in the first issue have been successfully dealt 
with and forced to abandon their nefarious 
business, is a matter of history. Tiie crimp, 
the boarding-master and their allies no longer 
own the body nor control the soul of the 
men who man tlie American Merchant Ma- 
rine. That there is more work ahead need 
hardly be told. But every one with even a 
remote knowledge of the last quarter century 
history will freely concede that really remark- 
able changes for the better have taken place 
in the life and conditions of the wage earners 



of the sea. And it should ever be borne in 
mind that whatever has been accomplished is 
due wholly and solely to self-help — i. e., to 
the determination of men to raise their voices 
in their own behalf. There have been so- 
called ".sailors' friends" from time iminemor- 
ial. but the best friend the seafarer ever fotmd 
is reliance in the ability of himself and his 
fellow workers to "get" things through the 
power of organization. 

.'^clf-hclp and self-reliance will ultimately 
bring about the emancipation of the seafaring 
class. .\nd in this worthy struggle the Jour- 
nal will endeavor to do its allotted share — 
just as it has done for twenty-six years. 

To our many loyal friends and patrons we 
extend sincere thanks for support rendered 
in the past and trust that the Journal's pol- 
icy will ever continue to meet with their 
a()proval. 



A FRANK ADMISSION. 



"v^liipiiing Illustrated," a .\ew York pub- 
lication, has for a long while endeavored 
to discredit the Seamen's bill with tlie 
usual stereotyped arguments. 

In the current issue, however, our es- 
teemed contemporary makes an unintended, 
but nevertheless splendid argument for 
one important feature of the bill. A boost 
coming from an active opponent of the 
Seamen's bill is appreciated and deserves 
publicity. So here it is — the frank admis- 
sion of a shijiowners' organ that our case 
is just : 

The value of competent technical advice to an 
owner contemplating building new ships can not 
be more forcibly brought out than in the case 
of officers and crew accommodation. The nig- 
gardliness of shipbuilders in this resjject is 
proverbial and unless an owner is advised by an 
able naval architect, he will often have to put up 
with accommodations so poorly arranged and 
uncomfortable as to make it difficult to retain 
on board a complement of good officers and 
cleanly men. It is an axiom of ship con- 
struction that bad and ill-ventilated quarters cost 
not one whit less to erect than plain but com- 
fortable ones, so designed as to attract the bet- 
ter class of seafarers. . , . 

It is idle to herd men together in such a way 
as to disgust them with their surroundings and 
then expect them to take personal interest in 
their work. Owners are often unjustly accused 
of undue parsimony in the matter of living 
accommodations when, as a matter of fact, their 
only fault Hes in having trusted blindly to the 
builders' promise to turn out a modern ship, 
without having anyone on their side competent 
to obtain from the builders the best that can 
be had within the amount available for con- 
struction. The fact is scarcely credible to the 
uninitiated, yet, new vessels of very large ca- 
pacity, fitted in respect of cargo-handling and 
machinery with the latest and best appliances, 
are often provided with living quarters for of- 
ficers and crew designed and located in defiance 
of the most elementary principles of domestic 
hygiene. It is such conditions of life at sea 
which are responsible for the propagation of 
pulmonary tuberculosis and other diseases so 
painfully frequent nowadays among seamen. 
Ventilation, lighting and sanitary arrangements 
often leave much to be desired even in the 
passenger accommodations of pretentious liners 
costing millions of dollars and it is obvious that 
the time has arrived for the technical societies 
nf shipbuilders and naval constructors to take 
up in earnest the discussion of problems per- 
taining to such important subsidiary details of 
ship construction as the heating and ventilation 
of ships, the lighting of crew spaces and of 
passenger ciuarters, the storage of food, the dis- 
posal of dirt and waste, etc. Such tiuestions are 
discussed privately during the preparation of 
designs and specifications, and papers per- 
taining to them would certainly prove of greater 
value than the oral exploitation of mechanical 
fads which take up so much of the time at meet- 
ings of societies of shipbuilders and engineers. 

.All of the foregoing is good argument 
for the enactment of the Seamen's bill. The 
fact that "new vessels of very large capac- 
ity are often provided with living quarters 
for the crew designed and located in de- 
fiance of the most elementary principles 
of domestic hygiene" ought to be sufficient 
to prove that shipowners will not volun- 



tarily provide the proper kind of accdin- 
modations for the crew. 

It is useless to appeal to shipbuilders 
and naval architects to take up the dis- 
cussion of improved crew quarters. The 
naval architect will continue to act upon 
the suggestions and desires of the owner 
and the latter's desire is to waste no more 
space on the crews' quarters than is ab- 
solutely necessary and required by law. 
Kvery cubic foot of space on board ship 
is valuable when utilized for passengers or 
cargo. On the other hand, there is not a 
cent of net revenue for the shipowner in an 
airy, commodious forecastle. The only 
way, therefore, to change this disgrace- 
ful condition is to compel the owner by law 
to do the proper thing in this respect. And 
the Seamen's bill will do it. 

Section .S of that bill deals specifically 
with the quarters of seamen. The space 
at present allotted, 71 cubic feet for each 
man, is the room needed to sling a ham- 
mock, it is the space allotted for this 
purpose on the old vessels of the world's 
navies, and while the space now given 
on our warships is about double the old 
rules, the rule yet remains on our mer- 
chant vessels, except in sailing vessels 
built after 1898. The section in ques- 
tion will amend the existing law by stri- 
king out "not less than 72 cubic feet and 
not less than 12 square feet" and insert- 
ing "not less than 100 cubic feet and not 
less than 16 square feet" as forecastle 
space allotted for each member of the 
crew. The laws of England. France. Ger- 
many, and Norway require 120 cubic feet 
of forecastle space for each member nf the 
crew, part of which, however, may be used 
for other purposes. 

Let us hope that "Shipping Illustrated" 
will look for other good features in the 
Seamen's bill and cease altogether with its 
unreasonable knocking. Many former op- 
ponents of the bill have become ardent 
advocates of the entire program contained 
in that meritorious measure after they had 
thoroughly familiarized themselves with its 
details. Perhaps our New York contem- 
porary has just begun to see the light — at 
any rate we live in hopes! 



We are still living under "Government by 
Injunction." Upon reque.st of the Eagle Glass 
Company of Wellsburg, W. \'^a., one Judge 
Dayton recently issued an injunction forbid- 
ding the organizers of the Glass Workers 
from even mentioning the object of the trades 
and labor union movement to the men in 
their employ. In Seattle, Wash., an over- 
conceited little judge is pulling off similar 
stunts daily. "Whom the gods would destroy 
they first make mad" ! Some day in the near 
future "human rights" are going to leap 
ahead of "property rights" with an awful 
velocity, and the injunction judge is going 
to be left in the same high and dry position 
as was "Injunction Bill" Taft after the last 
election. 



liic contract ft)r the erection of the new 
home of the Sailors' I'nion of the Pacific 
and the Alaska Fishermen's I'nion at San 
Francisco is about to be awarded. The 
building will be both substantial and orna- 
mental as well as modern and up-to-date in 
every respect. Details of the new structure 
together with a photographic reproduction of 
the building will be published in an early 
issue of the Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



TRANSPORT WORKERS' GROWTH. 



The report of the Central Council of the 
International Transport Workers' Federation 
to the recent convention of that body, held 
in London, England, has just arrived. Every 
phase of the international movement is dealt 
with in a comprehensive manner, there being 
no less than 108 pages in the booklet con- 
taining the report. 

One of the most interesting features of the 
report is that part relating to the increase in 
membership. A comparison with previous 
reports reveals splendid increases among the 
seamen and longshoremen. These groups 
have doubled and tripled their numbers. Tn 
spite of this, however, the railwaymen are 
still the strongest group in the Federation. 

The 881,950 members of affiliated unions 
are distributed in the various groups over 
twenty different countries, as follows: 

Railwaymen. 

F'.elgiunr .'. 7,000 

Bulgaria 2,300 

Denmark 5,158 

Great Britain 180,000 

France 22,000 

Italy 25,000 

Holland 2,500 

Austria 57,230 

.Sweden 21,000 

Switzerland 12,000 

Spain 40,000 

Hungary 4,000 

(In 1910: 266,516) 1913 membership, ,378,188 

Longshoremen, Bargemen, etc. 

America 15,000 

Belgium 5,078 

Germany 41,503 

(;reat Britain 77,756 

■■inland 2,000 

France 14,.300 

Holland 3,680 

Xorway 1,400 

Austria 1,-500 

Portugal 336 

Roumania 1,000 

Sweden 6,000 

Hungary 330 

(1910: 84,536) 169,883 

Street Carmen, Teamsters, etc. 

P.clgium 1,000 

Bulgaria : 1,100 

Germany 177,856 

(Jreat Britain 33,9.50 

I'rancc 15,000 

Holland 1,200 

Austria 8,500 

Portugal 500 

Switzerland 1,200 

1 1 ungary 700 

(1910: 89,016) 241,006 

Seamen. 

America 15,000 

Bel-^ium 1.500 

Denmark 3,000 

Germany 12,000 

Great Britain 47,600 

I'rance 3,248 

Italy 5,000 

Holland 3,075 

X'orway 1,500 

Austria 500 

Spain 200 

I lungary 250 

(1910: 27,850) 92,873 

The proceedings of the London convention 
are not yet at hand, but all available advance 
information points to a still more successful 
future for the transport workers of land and 
^ea. 

The International Transport Workers' Fed- 
eration has already become a power for good 
and is a standing warning to the exploiters 
of all lands. May it continue to grow and 
develop along the path of reason. The im- 
]iatient may find fault because it has not rev- 
olutionized the world in the few years of its 
existence, but it is better to disappoint a few 
llian to allow them to use the international 
field for experimental purposes. Steady prog- 
ress with constant inoderate results is cer- 



tainly to be preferred to one grand splurge 
followed by a setback which can not be over- 
come except by many years of education and 
agitation ! 



A WARNING. 



The Journal is in receipt of a communica- 
tion from a member of the .Sailors' Union of 
the Pacific who was induced to part with fifty 
dollars ('$50) after receiving a circular letter 
from a self-styled "Automobile Engineer and 
Machinist" at .San Francisco, in which the 
latter ])aintcd a rosy picture of the automo- 
bile business and "guaranteed" to make a 
competent chauffeur and rc])airman out of 
tlie prospective pupil if he was "really in 
earne.st," etc. 

Our correspondent complains that he re- 
ceived instructions for a few days only and 
was then left to study automobile engineer- 
ing all l)y himself until he grew weary of 
the task and returned to the city front, a sad- 
der l)ut a wiser man. Members of the Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific and others who 
may receive ctmningly worded circular letters 
(willi'Uit the tmion label) should make a thor- 
ough investigation of the would-be teacher's 
ability to make gtx)d before ])arting with their 
hard-earned cash. There are reliable schools 
of all descri])tions in .San l"'rancisco, and no 
one need take any chances with mushroom 
colleges which spring up over night. 

.\t any rate, beware of the "engineer" who 
attempts to obtain your confidence by offering 
a "free ]()\ ride." 



W'lun llu' JoPRN.xr, made its first a|ii)ear- 
ance il was (he only one of its kind in exist- 
ence. To-day we receive in cxciiange, sea- 
men's jmuMials from the following countries: 
luigland, Germany, Denmark. Sweden. Hol- 
land, Iiclgium, France, .\ustria and .Austra- 
lia. All are ])rcaching the gospel of organi- 
zation among the men who earn their liveli- 
hood on the waters. More power to our con- 
temporaries of other lands. . We can not read 
them all, but know that each one is doing its 
share toward an early realization of the 
Ilrotherliood of the Sea! 



When ])m-chasing collars don't forget that 
there is in the market a full variety of Union 
Label collars. The "Dell" brand is made 
under union conditions, bears the union label, 
and is therefore deserving of yom' |)atronage. 
lie consistent and don't wear a non-union col- 
lar around a union neck. 



'I'he lalior movement should be guarded 
against the growth that results in reple- 
tion. Strength and vitality depend uiion 
preserving a mean between the weakness 
of small, and the lethargy of large, bodies. 



ORGANIZED LABOR IN CANADA. 

(Continued from Page 1.) 



the United .States and Canada are shown to be 
of great magnitude. The grand total of the 
disbursements of these organizations for the 
last fiscal year reported (usually 1911-12), is 
placed at $13,799,000, and more than half of 
this amount being death claims. The largest 
expenditures reported for an individual organi- 
zation is that recorded for death benefits in the 
case of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engi- 
neers, where the disbursements reached $1,869,- 
934. While returns were not received from al' 
central organizations operating in the Dominion 
and the United States, the leading unions re- 
ported, and their statements represent the great 
l)ulk of expenditure. These disbursements are 
for Canada and the United .Stales taken to- 
gether, the returns for Canada alone not being 
.available. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 15. 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., Chas. Albrecht presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack. Shipwreck Benelit was 
awarded to three members of the crew of the 
".State of California.'' A donation of one hun- 
dred dollars was made to the striking copper 
miners of Michigan. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

84 Fmbarcadero. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept, 8, 1913. 
Shipping slack; few men around. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept, 8, 1913. 
Shipping quiet. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
N. E. corner of Hastings and Main streets. 
P. O, Box 1.365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, .Sept. 8, 1913, 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 8, 1913, 
.Shipping .-ind prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



.Vhcrdeen Agency, Sept. 8, 1013. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 8, 1913. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

G. A. SVENSON. Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100, 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



luireka Agency, Sept. 8, 1913. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

JOHN ANDERSEN, Agent. 
227 First St, P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 8, 1913. 
.Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent, 
128J/' Sepulveda BIdg,, Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67, Tel, 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 4, 1913. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair. 

JACK EDWARDSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



1 leadquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 11, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m.. Eugene Burke in the chair. .Secretary 
reported shipping slow. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 4, 1913. 
No meeting. Shipping medium. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203-205. Phone 
Main 22,33. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 4, 1913. 
No meetin.g. .Sliiiiping and [prospects poor, 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O, Box 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 4, 1913. 
X'o meeting. Shipping improving; prospects 
medium; few men ashore. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
New Grand Central Hotel, Room 110, Third 
and Flanders Streets. 



DIED. 

(). Rrcdesen, No. 161, a native of Norway. 
age 55, died at Naknek, .\laska, on March 23, 
1913. 

Alexander Kerleau, No. 645, a native of I' ranee, 
age 27, died at F'ort Stanton, New Mexico, on 
September 7, 1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE "BONUS" TRAGEDY. 



A\hatever else may be thought about the 
matter, it is undeniable that this is an age 
in which great speed on land, or sea, or in 
the air, or the completion of a piece of 
work, or the playing of a game, is a matter 
(if extraordinary attraction to the masses. 
Sometimes, however, the gratification ex- 
pected from an anticipated performance of 
this kind is balked by the failure of our 
social arrangements to bring out the best 
])ossible even in this doubtful sort of at- 
traction. 

.'\s an example, we may mention the liner 
Lusitania, which arrived here the other 
day. This vessel has just been equipped 
with a new and improved turbine installa- 
tion which her owners firmly believed 
would enable her to lower all transatlantic 
records. On a preliminary trial with the 
new engines, she made twenty-seven knots 
for twenty-one consecutive hours. The 
owners were so delighted with the showing 
that they gave a "bonus" to the 308 fire- 
men who had driven the vessel at this tre- 
mendous speed. 

But, remarkable as it may seem, the 
"bonus" destroyed all possibility of the 
larger performance being realized. Eighty 
of the ship's firemen, so overjoyed with 
receiving a little extra money, promptly 
went ashore and got drunk, failing to 
report for duty. Thus crippled by over 25 
per cent, of her driving force, the Lusitania 
crawled across at the moderate speed of 
twenty-three knots instead of the expected 
twenty-seven. 

Superficial observers no doubt will de- 
clare that the failure rests upon the fire- 
men. Most likely the company holds that 
view also. But the question remains as to 
why the firemen acted thus. .'\nd it will 
not take much inquiry to find that the 
abominable conditions under which such 
people labor were primarily responsible for 
this failure. 

The work of these men is so horribly 
wearing and so hideously repellant that 
they cannot possibly regard a bonus as a 
reward for work well performed, but 
rather as an une.xpected means of making 
them temporarily forget about its horrors. 
The firemen in this case regarded it as the 
means of procuring an extra anaesthetic 
beyond that which their wages afforded at 
the end of the voyage. They grabbed it as 
eagerly as a poor wretch burning in hell 
would grab a whisky bottle — if by any 
strange chance it could be brought within 
his reach — to make him temporarily forget 
the torment of the flames. 

It is "human nature," as our capitalist 
friends might say, though of course they 
would not recognize it as such in this 
case. But that is what it is, nevertheless. 

If one could get Doc. Parkhurst and 
"Billy" Sunday, Prof. Charles W. Eliot, 
the Archbishop of Canterbury, the Pope 
of Rome, Hugo Munsterberg, Philosopher 
Bergson, and a raft of others of that ilk, 
and chain them for a year or two with 
shovels and slices before the furnaces of a 
Ivusitania, and then give them a "bonus," 
what would they do? Well, they would 
do just as those firemen did — hike for the 
nearest doggery and fill up on "third rail" 
until they were as drunk as Davy's sow. 
And they wouldn't give three hoots in 
heaven if the Lusitania didn't make three 
knots an hour. While the jag lasted they 



would forget all about furnaces, shovels, 
rakes, slices and ash dumpers, and any one 
who urged them to resume these imple- 
ments would be told to — well, let us say, 
depart unto sheol, until the "bonus" ran 
out. 

We speak in this matter not as one with- 
out authority and experience. Many years 
ago we happened to be .shipmates with a 
young divinity student just "ordained," 
who innocently shipped in the stokehold 
from the Pacific Slope for a China voyage. 
He was a spectacled, pink-cheeked young 
person with the sweetest little side-whiskers 
imaginable, and a countenance in which 
simple piety, serene benignity and cheerful 
mildness were proportionately commingled. 
He benevolently and blandly informed the 
skeptical, unregenerate crew of scoffers on 
board that he merely intended to take a 
pleasant trip to China to recuperate after a 
period of arduous theological study. He 
got it, all right, but the pleasant part didn't 
materialize until he reached China. Then 
there came a break. The black night of the 
stokehold partially lifted and "the dawn 
came up like thunder outer China 'cross the 
bay," as the poet has it. There was water 
of joy and nepenthe in sight, and "Tiddy- 
fol-lol" — his given name aboard ship before 
he yielded his side-whiskers to the burning 
fiery furnace — went to it like a duck. He 
astonished the natives rather than convert- 
ed them, as was his first intention. Off 
Woo-sung the Yangtse-kiang is a mile 
wide, eleven fathoms by the deep, with a 
ten-knot current, but had that noble stream 
been compounded of arrack, samshu and 
sake, instead of mere H2O, we should have 
been in imminent danger of stranding, so 
fiercely did "Tiddy-fol-lol" assail the equiv- 
alent for the Chinese "demon-rum." Dry- 
ing u]) the Red Sea or the waters of Jordan, 
which he had heretofore regarded as Bible 
miracles, became the easiest kind of a joke 
to that holy workingman. He could have 
lapped them up himself had they contained 
anything stronger than ordinary water. He 
had his own private "bonus" with him from 
the "Slope" and he was quite sure that he 
knew how he was going to spend it in 
China. But he had another guess coming 
when he reached there. The heathens got 
it all right, but not in the form of tracts 
and New Testaments. He had splendid 
theories, but they wouldn't work — that is, 
after a three weeks' test before a stokehold 
furnace. Had he been a first cabin pas- 
senger. China might have been Christian- 
ized by this time, judging by his initial 
zeal. But, alas, he — or, perhaps, it — was 
not so "ordained." He got oflf to a wrong 
start, and — well, mistakes will happen. It's 
a sad story. 

Capitalist gibes and plaints about the 
drunkenness, worthlessness, laziness and 
dishf)nesty of the working class are beside 
the point. The real fact is that the capi- 
talist system, with its slave-driving, mon- 
strous overwork and merciless exploitation, 
has made work in general, and some forms 
of it in particular, so degrading, beastly and 
intolerable that no human being will do it 
unless compelled by actual starvation. And 
when so compelled, he will use any breath- 
ing space he may be permitted to get 
drunk and so forget for a time the fright- 
ful experience. And that he does get drunk 
is rather creditable to him than otherwise. 
It is, in a certain sense a revolt, though an 
ignorant kind of revolt, against social and 



economic arrangements that have made 
work a curse to most of the human race, 
and anything that will bring even tempo- 
rary forgetfulness of it becomes an ideal to 
be greatly desired. The general repug- 
nance to it is well typified in the common 
expression among workingmen everywhere, 
that if they had $10,000 or $20,000, or $30,- 
000 they'd "never do a single tap of work 
afterwards." And most men who will say 
this are not drunkards by any means. 

The Lusitania failed to break the speed 
record because her firemen were engaged in 
a speed contest of their own, that is, to get 
away from work and all thoughts of work 
as speedily as possible for the time being, 
even if they had eventually to return to 
their torment. And they naturally looked 
upon the company's "bonus" as a gift from 
the capitalist gods that would enable them 
to achieve this desirable, though, unfortu- 
nately, not eternal, nirvana. 

In the olden days, it was Dives, the rich 
man, who, in hell, begged for a drop of 
water to cool his tongue because of the tor- 
ment of the flames. But all that has been 
changed. Dives now superintends — by proxy 
— the flames of hell upon earth, and waxes 
fat on the proceeds of the conflagration, 
while Lazarus, instead of loafing in Abra- 
ham's bosom, fronts the fiery furnace, and 
when loosed for a time chases around hunt- 
ing a drop — or perhaps several drops — of 
whisky, not so much to cool his tongue, 
perhaps, as to enable him to forget the 
roasting. 

But he doesn't escape the verbal "roast- 
ing" of Dives, who, from a more com- 
fortable location than the bosom of the 
patriarch, damns Lazarus as a drunken, 
worthless sot, so ungrateful that he will 
even abuse the "bonus" handed him by his 
sympathetic master, and transform an in- 
tended stimulant to work into a stimulant 
to make him neglect and forget it. 

Lazarus should worry. But not about 
that.— New York Call. 



WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEEN. 



How fortunate it was for society that the 
sixty or more girls who were burned to 
death in the Binghamton Clothing Com- 
pany's building were not inmates of a fash- 
ionable seminary. Being only factory girls, 
and receiving the ordinary wages which 
factory girls receive, and doing presumably 
the ordinary and commonplace duties which 
factory girls are supposed to do, their sig- 
nificance was unimportant. 

It also fortunately happens that their 
places can easily be taken by other fac- 
tory girls, presumably at no higher wages 
than these girls received, for the mere 
shuffling out of fifty would not create 
such an increased demand as to raise the 
wages of the newcomers. 

But if this fire had burned down a fash- 
ionable female .seminary and fifty society 
young ladies had been burned to death, 
what a diflference that would have made ! 
The Bulgarian war, the tariflf discussion, 
the Mexican imbroglio, would have faded 
into utter insignificance in comparison with 
such a national calamity. — Life. 



Demand the union label. It is the only 
guarantee of fair conditions. You can get 
it if your demand is loud enough, long 
enough and persistent enough. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FIRST AMERICAN MILLIONAIRE. 



Much has been said about the heroism 
of the American millionaire and much 
stress laid upon the manner in which they 
have acquired their vast holdings. All this 
rubbish is held up to the youth with much 
pomp and ceremony as a worthy example 
to emulate. Let us examine the records of 
several of these illustrious gentlemen be- 
fore we advise our children to adopt their 
plans, for example: Stephen Girard, the 
first American millionaire, will afiford us a 
fair type of their class. 

At the age of twenty-two Girard became 
the captain of a trading vessel and began 
smuggling operations extending from New 
Orleans to Canada, and while laying off 
the Delaware Capes during a dense fog he 
learned of the declaration of war by the 
American colonies. He thereupon hurried 
to Philadelphia, where he sold the vessel, 
cargo and all other belongings in his charge 
and with the proceeds opened up the first 
wholesale liquor house in the colonies on 
Water street in 1776. Girard, so we are 
told, made money fast. 

During the time the British were oc- 
cupying Philadelphia, Girard furnished 
them with rum and information. He was 
charged by the Americans with extreme 
corruption, double-dealing and duplicity, 
as he had taken the oath of allegiance to 
the colonies, while secretly giving informa- 
tion to the British. While other merchants 
were being bankrupted, Girard's business 
was in a flourishing condition. The next 
we hear of Girard was his connection with 
the San Domingo affair of 1791 when the 
natives rebelled against the French and 
started an insurrection. Meanwhile Gi- 
rard had secured a couple of vessels and 
sent them to the island port to await de- 
velopments. The first sign of danger the 
rich planters took their valuable belongings 
aboard Girard's ships, and scurried back to 
get the remainder. But, never returned, 
and as there was no one left to claim the 
goods Girard sold them in Philadelphia and 
placed the proceeds to his own private bank 
account, netting him something like $60,- 
000. 

With this stolen plunder he was able to 
build several splendid ships which enabled 
him to engage in the Chinese and East 
India trades. With the proceeds he was 
enabled to start a bank and from this 
source he became a millionaire. 

Remember that Girard stole a vessel and 
cargo and with the proceeds opened up the 
first wholesale liquor house in the colonies, 
with the proceeds of the liquor house he 
was able to buy two vessels which he sent 
to San Domingo on a questionable mission, 
which returned laden with stolen plunder 
which was sold and the proceeds applied 
to the building of other vessels that were 
u.sed in the Chinese and East India trade, 
which netted enormous profits, enabling 
him to start a bank and become a million- 
aire. 

From time to time we will give a short 
sketch of the American robber-barons, not 
as history paints them, but just as they 
are and there is not one that can show 
any cleaner record than that accorded Gi- 
rard. All the charges that are made in 
the above article are taken from the "Great 
American Fortunes" by Myers, a reputed 
authority, which shows up the shams and 



hypocrisy of the rich highbinders, cut- 
throats and thieves that have been in con- 
trol of this Government from the very 
first. 

What do our Christian friends say about 
the foundation of the first American for- 
tune? It should cause them to shudder 
when they contemplate the origin in stolen 
plunder and booze. But that is how for- 
tunes are made. If honest toil produced 
millionaires there would be no poverty in 
the world to-day. It is only the honest 
people that are in poverty. Their honesty 
has been the prey of rogues and rascals 
who have worked under the cover of 
patriotism and the church. The working 
people have ever been the victims. Social- 
ism will abolish this condition and banish 
it forever 'from the face of the earth by 
giving the same opportunity to all alike 
and no favoritism would be shown. — Truth. 



BERI-BERI AND ITS CAUSE. 



Speaking, in the Tropical Medicine Sec- 
tion of the International Congress of Medi- 
cine in London, August 7, Dr. W. L. Brad- 
don, referring to the results of the measures 
taken against beri-beri in British Malaya, 
made the startling statement that the cause 
of beri-beri, which had been a mystery for 
centuries, was now known, and that the 
disease was due to nothing more or less 
than the use of rice which has become de- 
glutinized. Whatever future years might 
have in store for medicine, he said, it was 
unlikely that any discovery would prove 
of more benefit to a large portion of hu- 
manity than the elucidation of the cause 
of beri-beri, which had marked the open- 
ing years of this century. 

The malady, which had all the marks of 
an infectious disease and the persistence of 
the plague, was now proved to be due to 
nothing more than inferior rice. Its onset 
might be prevented simply by changing the 
diet of the native population from white 
(uncured) to whole (cured) rice. 

For years work in Singapore Prison was 
paralyzed. Prisoners were panic-stricken, 
and the authorities were. at their wits' end 
owing to the constant ravages of beri-beri. 
Dr. Braddon suggested to the Governor 
that whole rice should be substituted for 
the white rice, and the result had been 
that the disease had practically vanished. 

Similar measures at Singapore and Se- 
langor asylums had been followed by like 
results. 

Beri-beri, said Dr. Braddon, must be laid 
to the door of the miller, who, by his well- 
intentioned operation, rendered the rice en- 
tirely unfit for food by removing the essen- 
tial principles. Had anyone suggested at 
Ihe last Congress in London that the rem- 
edy for the dread disease required no skill 
to prepare, no knowledge, and no chemist, 
he would have been laughed to scorn. Yet 
what other remedy had been attended with 
such invariable and instantaneous success? 

He suggested that the authorities respon- 
sible for the health of native communities 
should prevent or restrict the sale and use 
as a food-stuff of .rice which had been de- 
glutinized. — Shipping Illustrated. 



Attend your union meetings. If it were 
not for your union, remember that you 
would have a ten- or eleven-hour day in- 
stead of an eight-hour day. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAT CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 4S. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, VTIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 65 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295 

BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault St. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE SOUTH AFRICAN CRIME. 

The awful stury cabled through from 
South Africa is enough to make us tremble 
for the future of the social fabric. Johan- 
nesburg is one huge shambles, the myrmi- 
dons of capital apparently slaughtered all 
who came in their way with the abandon 
of a prize winner at a pigeon shoot. 

Says the cable : "When martial law was 
proclaimed the inhabitants were ordered to 
remain in their houses after dusk, on pain 
of being shot. The troops occupied the 
center of Loveday street, where it bisects 
Commissioner street, and thus commanded 
four streets, which were raked with rifle 
fire, the rioters taking refuge in the side 
streets." 

Just imagine the streets of a city being 
raked with rifle fire in these days of civi- 
lization and progress. But the correspond- 
ent writes in the picturesquely, gruesome, 
descriptive strain, and he further says: 
"The sight of the dead, dying and wounded 
littering Commissioner and Loveday streets 
made a deep impression." 

A deep impression ! Ciod above, it must 
have created a deep impression ! The sun 
of Heaven smiling down on the bloody 
streets littered with the dead ! The birds 
twittering in the trees, and His Images 
dead, dying and wounded, in the gutters, 
on the pavement, and strewn around the 
roadway! Just another chapter of Pitts- 
burg, a continuation of the recent Vir- 
ginian outrages, a fresh and cheering trib- 
ute to the lust for gold. 

We live but one life on earth. It has its 
joys and its sorrows for us all, and these 
brave hearts in the army of labor have 
had the spark that cannot come back bru- 
tally, vengefully quenched. They wanted 
another shilling or so a day increase in 
wages! It was a sufficiently heinous crime 
to merit immediate despatch to hell or 
heaven or valhalla! Another shilling a 
day ! And it matters not about the weep- 
ing wife and the orphaned children. God's 
will be done, say the gold barons, afl?l at 
the Rand Club the bloated money bugs 
cringe and order their paid emissaries tn 
shoot on, shoot on, and shoot straight. 

Another chapter of Pittsburg, did I say? 
Rather another installment of the drunken 
cry for a united Empire, the cry of the 
miserable creature who, clutching a dia- 
mond in each claw, plaintively asked the 
British Government to save the Outlander 
(the laborer!) and cement the glorious, 
radiant Empire. This impression of Jo- 
hannesburg is nothing after all in compari- 
son with the big crime which left thou- 
sands of ugly, misshapen corpses over the 
veldt, which left the smoldering, blackened 
farm where the children once played, which 
ordained that patriotic burghers be mur- 
dered in cold blood, stripped of their pos- 
sessions or exiled. It was a holiday earned 
by the vampires of capital. 

The demons in hell must surely be laugh- 
ing in their cups! 

Throw your minds back a decade. The 
millionaire breed did not covet the Rantl. 
They did not dislike Kruger or Steyn per- 
sonally. Of course not. It was simply a 
matter of their suffering fellow country- 
men, who had not a voice in the affairs of 
the Transvaal; they were fighting for the 
rights of the worker. Their ample waist- 
coats sagged because of the injustice to 



their kith and kin, and their hearts were 
almost rent in twain by the insults to 
r.ritain. to the Union Jack, and the Great 
White Queen. 

When the war commenced these bloated 
mining magnates — most of whom founded 
their fortunes in wickedness and crime — 
fled in weird disorder to the swell clubs of 
London, where they wept copious tears 
when news came of the fallen — wdiere they 
wept copious tears at the temporary stop- 
page of their filthy profits. They did not 
go to the front and help steal and murder 
to more securely grasp the worker and 
producer by the throat. They skulked away 
in modern Babylon with pretty women and 
bubbling wine: they bestowed diamonds 
upon the frail ones of the music halls, and 
read f)f the battles in the halfpenny papers. 
( )n this occasion of to-day they hadn't time 
to scamper out of the fighting zone ; they 
gathered like frightened rats in the Rand 
Club, and paid rufifianly thugs to shoot the 
innocent and industrious — that is what 
these demoniac parasites did. 

.\ha ! the humor of it! Those patriotic 
and hardly used Outlanders, for whom Paul 
Kruger was sent to his grave, for whom 
the flower of Britain and the colonies and 
r.oerland bled and suffered, for the redress 
of whose grievances the Barnatos and Joels 
and Robinsons dedicated their lives — it is 
these same Outlanders who to-day are 
weltering in their own blood in the streets 
of Jewberg. 

You see. things have changed somewhat. 
To-day it is not a matter of Empire ; it is 
only an affair of an extra bob a day. Eng- 
land spent two hundred millions when it 
was a matter of Empire, but she only 
sjiends i)all cartridge and cold white steel 
when it is a matter of wages. 

Our sins have found us out; they are 
licing revisited upon our children. And if 
humanity was not staggered before Oom 
I'aul died, his shade must be shivering 
across the Styx when it sees Louis Botha 
fighting, not for the native veldt, but for 
the heirs of Barnato and the sensuality of 
the Joels and their trible. — The Worker, 
lirisbane. (Queensland. 



NEW PRESERVATIVE PROCESS. 



.\ new preservative process has been 
tried in Nova Scotia, which is claimed to 
have great merit for keeping fresh fish in 
fine condition for a long time, and at small 
cost. 

If all said of this be true, it may prove 
of great economic importance throughout 
the world. 

The inventor is J. R. Henderson, of Syd- 
ney, Australia, and according to Halifax 
papers he was attracted to Nova Scotia as 
a promising field for his process by reason 
of her great fish industry. 

By his method, fresh fish are first put in 
cold storage for two hours until chilled 
throughout, to the freezing point of 32 de- 
grees. They are then placed in a tank of 
filtered sea-water, to which is added a cer- 
tain quantity of brown sugar to serve as 
a germicide, and 16 per cent of common 
salt to prevent freezing. The temperature 
of the water is then lowered to 10 above 
zero. After two hours in this tank the 
treatment is coinplete, and the fish are 
ready for market or transportation. 

It is asserted that fish so treated will 



keep in excellent condition for six days, 
without use of ice or further refrigeration 
in any form, and that the process does not 
impair flavor or quality in any way. Brit- 
ish authorities are said to endorse it as 
both efficacious and harmless. 

California has a large fish industry that 
might use this Henderson process with 
good results. 

The same inventor has a process for the 
preservation of fresh fruit, which he says 
will keep it unfermented for a period of 
four months, and without injury, but of 
this particulars are at present lacking. 

It scarcely seems feasible to dispense 
with refrigeration in the transportation of 
our California fresh fruits to the East, but 
yet it may be possible to employ some 
harmless chemical or germicidal process 
for the purpose, in connection w'ith pre- 
cooling, and so save cost of icing in transit. 
— Sacramento Bee. 



TO RAISE LAKE ERIE. 



I'he level of Lake Erie has beeti slightly 
lowered by the loss of the water that has 
been taken frfim the Great Lake system 
by such enterprises as the Chicago Drain- 
age Canal and the power plants at Niagara. 
It is now proposed that the L^nited States 
and Canada shall jointly restore the level 
by building a weir in the Niagara River, 
under the auspices of the International 
Waterways Commission. The commis- 
sion, as stated in The Engineering Record, 
recommended the construction of such a 
weir to Congress on June 27 last, through 
the President: 

"The commission stated the value of the 
proposed work to Lake Erie ports could 
hardly be estimated, and that it would re- 
sult in extensive improvements to harbors 
and docks. 

"The cost of the weir and consequent 
works to avoid damage to property is es- 
timated at $3,500,000. The commission 
recommended its location at Grill Creek on 
the .American shore and Hog Island on 
the Canadian, just above Welland River. 
The dam would raise the level of the 
Niagara 3 feet for a distance of one and a 
half miles. The commission suggested the 
construction of a levee to prevent damage 
to adjoining property. 

"At low water level the Niagara River 
at the Bufl!'alo water works would be 
raised 1.08 feet and at flood 0.19 foot; the 
level of I^ake Erie would l^e raised 0..S1 
l< ot, at cxtreine low stage, 0.39 foot at 
mean, and 0.11 foot at extreme flood stage. 
The commission reported that the plan 
would raise the mean level of Lake St. 
Clair 0.23 foot and that of Lake Huron 
0.09 foot. 

"The level of the barge canal at Tona- 
wanda. X. Y.. would be afifected by the 
change, but the commission suggested the 
cfnstruction of a guard-lock as a remedy 
for this. 

"The commission also reported that the 
weir would eliminate any injurious effect 
upon the Lake Erie level of diversion of 
waters at Niagara Falls for water-power 
purposes, and would reduce the range of 
oscillation on Lake Erie 4^^ per cent. 

"The report pointed out that diversion of 
water to the Chicago Drainage Canal, to 
the Erie Canal, and for power-plant pur- 
poses at Niagara Falls had considerably 
reduced the level of Lake Erie." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



mately 3.S men, were struck, and about 
?i2S members have received the advance. 
TIic members of No. 271, Kokomo, Ind., 
employed on brass and aluminum, ha\'c 
secured a $3.2.^ minimum for a nine-hour 
day. This is an advance of 25 cents per 
day. The members of No. 169, Gabon, 
C)lii(), have received an advance of 1.^ cents 
per day all around. The minimum is now 
$3.10 for coremakers and $3.2,^ for molders. 
.About 45 foundries under the jurisdiction 
of our unions in .\evv York City, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., and Jersey City, N. J., have 
fjranted a $3.75 minimum for a nine-hour 
(lav. This is an advance of 25 cents per 
day on the minimum. .\ settlement of the 
wage question has been reached between 
forty of the foundrymen of Philadelphia, 
Pa., and our unions in that city, which 
provides for a $3.40 flat minimum for a 
nine-hour day, beginning July !. and a $3.50 
flat minimum January 1, 1014. 'J'lie prc- 
N'ious rate was $3.10 for coremakers and 
$3.25 for molders. The members of No. 
196, Youngstovvn, have secured a minimum 
of $3.75 flat for a nine-hour day in all 
of the foiuidries. This is an advance of 
25 cents per day on the minimum. The 
mcndiers of No. 199, ?>acramento, Cal., 
employed in the jobbing shops have been 
granted a $4.00 flat minimum for an eight- 
hour da}'. The previous minimum was 
$3.75. The members employed at ihe 
Spencer Pleating Company, under the jur- 
isdiction of No. 34, Scranton, Pa., have 
been granted a $3.50 flat minimum. 



Nine Hours and Wage Increase. 

The differences that ha^■e existed since 
December, 1910, between the I'altimorc 
and Oliio Railroad Company and the ma- 
chinists employed in their shops on the 
system extending from P.altimorc to Phila- 
delphia, Chicago, and St. Pouis have finally 
been adjusted through the efforts ol' the 
United States Department of Pabor. After 
the great strike that existed on the P>alti- 
morc and Ohio Railroad in 1910 had 1)een 
settled efforts were made by the machin- 
ists in its employ to get a conference with 
the officials for the purpose of entering 
into a system of working agreements, but 
without succss. In Afarch, 1912, .Assist- 
ant Superintedent of Motive Power and 
Construction V. IT. Clark lield a confer- 
ence with the representatives of the ma- 
cliinists, when a set of agreements was sidi- 
mitted to them which were not satisfactorv, 
and consequently further negotiations were 
broken off until February, 1913, when ne- 
gotiations liegan anew, and after many 
conferences were had no satisfactorv ar- 
rangements could be arrived at. 'J'his 
caused a discontinuance of further negotia- 
tions, and matters remained in statu quo 
until July 15, 1913, when Secretary Wil- 
son, of the United States Department of 
Labor, through a representative, John .A. 
Aloffitt, offered the good offices of his de- 
partment in an endeavor to bring about 
an amicable adjustment of the existing dif- 
ferences. Mr. Alofifitt held several inter- 
views with representatives of both sides 
to the controversy, and finally succeeded in 
bringing about a resumption of the nego- 
tiations. Many conferences were held be- 
tween the officials of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad Company and a committee 



representing the machinists, including Gen- 
eral President Johnston and Vice-President 
Conlon. These conferences continued for 
about four weeks, with the result that 
articles of agreement were determined upon 
for the period of from September 1, 1913, 
to August 30, 1914, a part of which are as 
follows: .A nine-hour workday; regulation 
of apprentices; minimum wage scale, with 
an increase of from 35 cents to 36 cents 
per hour, and also improved sanitary condi- 
tions, which arc as follows: (\) Good 
water shall be provided for drinking pur- 
poses and ice in season. (2') Pleat will be 
]M-ovi(led in all shops and rounflhouses in 
cold weather. f3) .All pits and closets shall 
1)e kept in clean and sanitary ccmdition. 
(4) No emjjloyes shall be recpiired lo work 
under a loc'omotive witliout same being 
placed over a pit, or protected either by 
a blue flag or by another employe pres- 
ent. (S) All engines shall be i)laccd midcr 
smoke jacks while fired up in roundhouse 
so far as i)raclicable. This is the first set 
of agrecnienfs entered into between I'.alti • 
more and Ohio Railroad Com])any and their 
machinists since the year 190S. This settle 
ment will benefit several thousand men. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORM. 



New Haven's Slaughter. 

'i'he following wrecks have occurred on 
the New Y'ork, Hartford and New TIa\en 
Railroad witliin the last twenty-six months: 
lune 8, 1911. Fairfield, Conn., freight, four 
killed; signals were disregarded July 12, 
1911, P)ridgeport. Conn., Federal ex])ress, 
twelve killed, 100 injured; due to the care- 
lessness of the engineer in taking a cross- 
over ;it a high-rale of s])eed. August 28, 
1011, Miildletown, Conn., passenger train, 
sixty injtired ; rails spread. October 1.^, 
I'Ml, I'.erlin junction, C'onn., ])assenger 
tr.ain, two dead, fi\'c injured; due to rtm- 
awa^• freight cars crashing into rear end 
of train. June 11. 1912, Clinton, Mass., 
passenger train, eight injm-ed; ran into an 
open switch at high sped. July 25, 1912, 
Stoningham Junction. Conn., passenger 
train, three killed, four injured: collision 
due to defective signals. August 8, 1912, 
Dorchester, Mass., five killed, sixteen in- 
jured; passenger train jumped track. .Au- 
gust 0. 1912, South Boston, Alass., passen- 
ger train, seven dead, forty injured; de- 
railed. October 3. 1912. ^^'estport, Conn., 
vSpringfield express, nine killed, fifty in- 
jured; due to taking cross-over at a high 
rate of speed. November 16. 1912, Green's 
Farm, Conn., Merchants' Limited, thirty- 
five injured ; due to defective e(|uipment. 
November 17, 1912, Putnam, Conn., freight 
train, one killed, two injured; rear-end col- 
lision in fog. February 22, l')13, Watcr- 
burv. Conn., passenger train, twenty-one in- 
jured ; rear-end collision in fog. June 12, 
1913, Stamford, Conn., Boston express b\' 
wav of Springfield, five killed and about 
a score injured; collision caused by ig- 
noring signals and failure of airbrakes to 
work. September 2, 1913, the fast Bar 
TTarbor express was telesco])ed b}' th<' 
White Mountain express between \\'alling- 
ford and North Haven, twenty-six are dead 
and fifty injured; collision due to heavy 
fog. 



W-hen you stay away from your union 
meeting you are then ])laying into the 
hands of the enemv. 



Following is the Economic PLitform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
,uul abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public vi'ork. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
.States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 



Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 



into 
14. 
frage 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
i;u-nt, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks.. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock. P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

AS'i'ORL\, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
f;EOROKTC:iWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER. (Jre. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PE'l'ERSBl'RG, Alaska. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart SL 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can he procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

t^EDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

2t ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. 8. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



^0^0^0^0K0t0t^^0^0^0^ -^ 0k^^0t^^0t0t^^ 



Residence Phone Ballard 1639 



Battleship No. 39 will probably be 
named the "North Carolina." In 
that case, the armored cruiser of 
that name, launched seven years ago, 
will have her name changed, prob- 
ably to "Charlotte." 

The replicas of Columbus' fleet 
presented to Chicago by Spain in 
1892 are at anchor in Racine harbor 
while legal action is under way at 
Detroit, Mich., to prevent the boat.s 
.sailing for San Francisco to partici- 
pate in the Panama-Pacific Exposi- 
tion. 

Germany has created a new island 
in the North Sea. It lies off the 
lower part of Heligoland and is half 
as big as that island. The materials 
for creating the new island are being 
sent from Germany. Heligoland is 
very seldom visited, as it is devoted 
entirely to military works, and every 
arrival is watched with suspicion. 

It is claimed that the new Russian 
destroyer Novik is the fastest ship 
in the world. She developed 37.3 
knots in her trial. She was built at 
Swienemunde from designs by the 
Vulcan Company, and was fitted with 
turbines and boilers made by it at 
Hamburg and Stettin. The Novik 
burns oil and is not fitted with 
smokestacks. 

The Osaka Shosen Kaisha has, it 
is rumored, decided to build from six 
to nine 10,000-ton cargo-boats, and 
with them to establish a monthly 
service to Europe via Suez, with 
London as terminal point and calls 
at Antwerp or Rotterdam, and prob- 
ably, later on, at Marseilles or Havre. 
The two 9,000-ton steamers already 
ordered will also be put into the 
line. It is also proposed to double 
the company's present capital of 16,- 
500,000 yen. 

The Institute of International Law, 
which has been sitting at Oxford, 
after minute discussion has adopted 
M. Faucilles draft of the Manual of 
Laws of Maritime Warfare as it was 
finally redrafted by the Paris com- 
mittee last April. The manual will 
now be submitted to the various 
governments in anticipation of the 
third peace conference at The 
Hague. One article in the manual 
prohibits the transformation of ves- 
sels into ships of war on the high 
seas. 

The U. S. S. "Hannibal," which has 
been surveying in the vicinity of the 
Atlantic terminal of the Panama 
Canal with a view to having more 
accurate charts of shoals in the track 
of steamers headed for the canal from 
American and European ports, has 
completed her work. The present 
Admiralty charts of that section are 
based upon soundings taken about 50 
years ago and corrected from time 
to time. This is the first time that 
a systematic survey of that region 
has been undertaken by the U. S. 
Navy. 

The following testimonials have 
been awarded by the President of 
the United States to the master and 
crew of the British steamer "Asun- 
cion de Larrinaga," in recognition of 
their services in rescuing the crew 
of the American schooner "Future," 
which was abandoned in the North 
Atlantic ocean January 5, 1913, viz: 
a gold watch and chain for John J. 
Doyle, master; a binocular glass for 
Ernest Fox, chief officer; and gold 
medals for Jose Dopico (boatswain), 
and Manuel Modcllo and Ramon 
Pose (seamen). 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation Sclnool 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
202-4 Grand Trvuik Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. 0pp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Vernon W. Buck Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & KNUTSON 
Lawyers and Prectors In Admiralty 
Free .Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



smoke: 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty." the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoffice, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 
Abrahamsen, Jo- Hughes, W. 

hannes Hansen, C. T. 

Anderson, H. Hansen, Simon 

Andersen, A. -1638 Jensen, Oscar 
Andersen, Steve Jensen, J. R. 



Anderson, Gerth 

-383 
Anderson, Karl 

Eric 
Anderson, A 
Alonzo, — 
Behr, Henry 
B.Ty, George 
BurhoUz. F. 
Butler, R. 
Bach, E. E. 
Berglund, A. 
Blackwood, R. 
Behrend, F. C. 
Bouton, E. 
Bucknam, J. W. 
Bergman, J. E. 
Contreras, J. 
Carrutliers, M. 
Chiistensen, 

Trygen 
Carty, Carl 
Davidson, Jacob 
Davis, Joseph 
Iianiels, C. 
Dean, J. W. 
Dylwik. B. 
De Sllva, Danis 
Ekholm. Ellquls 
Ellinsen, H. O. 
Enig. Herman 
Ehlert. August 
Erlandsen, L. E. 
Ericksen, O. C. 

-SS5 
Farley, Dan 
Fon.slund. Victor 



Jade. Hans 
Jaeger, F. J. 
Jacobson, Martin 
Jennings, B. C. 
-1797 Johnson. Jess 

Johanson. I. -2095 
Johanson, Harry 
Johnson, Walter 
Johnson, A. -2186 
Jorgenscn. Chas. 
Kalning, J. 
Kelly, P. 
Krutz. Ivan 
Kushel, V. J. 
Klebnlkoff, I. W. 
Korber, Th. 
Kuhlman, W. 
Kuhne. W. 
KJorsvIg, John 
Kreutz. Karl 
Larsen, Peter 
I^arsen, L. A. 
Larsen, Charle.s 
Little. Sid 
Ljunggren. Edmund 
T.of, Oscar 
Lunder. BJorn 
Larson. Ingvald 
Larsen. Axel -174f! 
Larson, John 
Lofstrand, G. 
T,overa, P. 
Mattson. Nils 
Marks, T. 
Ma her, W. 
Mattson, Mike 
Martins. Paul 



Fredrikson, Berger Ma the son, Norman 
Fredril<sen, Harry MrPherson, R. 



Fjellman, Geo. 
Freeman, J. 
Franzell, A. 
Gjelseth. Ingvald 
Granberg, Eric 
Gaarden, O. C. 
Gehrig, H. 
Glerahn, Ral 
Grifteth, L. G. 
Gabrielsen, Gust 
Groth. John 
Gravik, K. J. 
Gueno, P. 
Guiidersen, W. 
Hansen, Ernest 
Hansen. A. M. 
Hansen, Hans 
Helpap, A. 
Hillisen, Halver 



McCarthy. J. 
Meskell, Mat. 
Mortensen. J. C. 
Monson, Sam 
Murphy. D. 
Mynchmeyer, H. 
Martinsen, Ingvald 
Magnusen, L. 
M.-irtinsen, K. 
Murray, Janus 
Mattson, Rudolf 
McKenwn, T. 
Nos, T. 
Newland, E. 
Nielsen. F. M. 
Nllsen, T. H. 
Nam. H. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nelson, H. J. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERIV1AIM&.SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
SEATTLE. WASH. 

Seattle Navigation School 

Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for Ucease 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 

By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Ftlot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDINQ 
911 Western Ave., SBIATTI^, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne M4 




CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
.\lso bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hmts and 

Gents* Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



w. 



E. 



Andersen, Mike 
Anderson, Ole 
Abrams, George 
Anderson, Erik B. 
Andersen, Nils 
Andersen. Sam 
Andersen, Henrik 
Androllo, A. 
Andersen, Peder 
Andersen, Axel P. 
Aibrechtsen, Aage 
Alle-xander, John 
Rackman, P. W. 
Berg, Gilils 
BucKmer, W. 
Buhler, Karl 
Brodig, Wm. G. 
Bahr, H. 
Bergman, Karl 
Chase, W. B. 
Carlsen, Charlie 
Conway, A. M. 
Collins, Frank 
Colman, E. 
Christopher, C. 
Christensen, Albert 
Christensen, H. P. 
Cunninchon, W. P. 
Dennis, Charlie 
Day, Aca. 
Ehenbaugh, W. J. 
Ekham, Frans 
Edstroni, John 
Fredrickson, H. G. 
Gjorty, P. 
Gordia, Piet 
Grundt, Johannes 
Gibson, Bert 
Holt, G. A. 
Helisten. Gustaf 
Holm, E. 
Henrickson, John 
Henke, Ernest 
Henriks. Waldemar 
Hellman. Albln 
Hogstad, Andreas 

Mikolsen 
Hultman, A. 
Huntington, E. R. 
Johnson, W. 
Johnson, Jack 
Jolinson, Ole C. 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, H. 
Johnson. Chris 
Joliansen, Johan F. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Karisen, K. E. 
Kenny. James 
Kvalvik, Oskar 
Kathy, Albert 
Kepper, H. 
Koop. M. 
Larson, Andrew 
Lundquist, Ernest 



Lane. Charles 
Larsen, Martin 



Soren 
Engvald 
Fred 
George Lus- 



Larsen. 
Larsen, 
Larson, 
Larsen, 
berg 

Lemarchard, Louis 
Lindroos, Oskar 
Lewik, Karl 
Lundmark, Helge 
McLellan, Jolin 
Macrae, Alexander 
Marchane, Louis 
Mattson, Maurits 
Matson, Wlktor 
McMalione, Jack 
Menzel, Otto 
Meinke, Rudolf 
Mikolsen, Andreas 
Moberg, Karl 
Miller, H. B. 
Nilson, Anton 
Nielson, Edward 
Norman, Ludvig 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Norberg, John 
Olsen, Severln 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Ophein, Lars 
Oisen, Ansgar 
Olsen, Jolin Andreas 
Ostling, Emanuel 
■Palmer, Jos. H. 
Petriecli, Tlieodore 
Pratt, M. L. 
Petersen, Peter 
Petterson, Elnar 
Perouse, Andre 
Person, Charles 
Peterson, Chas. 
Rasmussen, Tlior. 
Rautlo, Jacob 
Raetz, August 
Reinke, H. 
Rliodes, Fred 
Roed, Halfdan 
Schroda, P. H. 
.Swenson, John B. 
Senberg, Gus 
Steen, J. 
Soukka, August 
Schulz, Robert 
Schmidt. Erik 
Soule. J. L. 
Stardhal, J. 
Swanson, Carl O. 
Tarn ford, B. A. 
Thomas, A. 
Wadren, G. F. 
Wall, H. 
Warren, Chas. 
Wehi. J. 
Wlshart, Jno. 
Westhund, Gust. 



B. 



Nissen, L. 
Olsen. Harold 
O'Brien, J. S. 
Pedersen, O. R. 
Poppe, Geo. 
Petterson, Karl 
Petersen, Andrew 
Reed, P. 
Rees, W. 
Rasmussen, R. J. 

-687 
Roberts, J. 
Rosen, B. H. 
Rylander. R. 
Roche, J. 



Sat re. I. 

Skuhber. H. (Reg- 
istered) 
Stahlbaum, E. 
Stewart, (jhas. 
Swensson, Emanuel 
Smith, T. 
Siebert, J. 
Stone. C. L. 
Swarthly, Jack 
Saudburg. C. 
Schuldt. Theoder 
Seley, G. 
Shlrashig. K. 
Smith, Clay 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

4.19 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODQINQ 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



HOTEL YOUNG 

European Plan 

313-315-317 SECOND ST., EUREKA 

Rooms, 25c per Night up 

Per Week, $1.50 up 

UNION LUNCH COUNTER 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PALMER, Proprietor 

A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand— Sailors' Hall— 553-R 

EUREKA 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union made. 
PAGE & SCHWARTZ 
Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



•AhL^trom, Harry 
-\nder.son, John 
Breien, Hans 
Clausen, Fred 
Debus, Fred 
Elilert, August 
Gudmundsen, Gud- 

mund 
Hansen, Harald 
Ismas. Richard 

Sorenscn, Geo. 
St err, W. T. 
Stuber, H. M. 
Storey, C. P. 
'I'ayior, P. 
'I'hornson, P. 
'I'lierkilsen, A. 
Ticksman. C. 
Tyghe, T. 
Thienpoint, F. 
Tounsend, R. 
Veasted, T. P. 



Jaeobsen. W. 
Jensen, George 
Nilson, Anton 
Miller, Fred 
Publicatus, August 
Plas, Henry 
Robertson. A. 
Syvertsen, Paul 
Thorsen, Fredrik 



VanderLInden, H. 
Van Loo, A. 
Vahs, H. 
Waischwell, A. 
Wlngsness, A. 

PACKAGES. 
Miller. I.,ouls 
MuUer, Bernard 

Joseph 
Nelson, Oscar J. 
Alxichs, Aug. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

p. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Tacoma, Waah., Letter List. 



Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Berglind, Erik 
Conley, J. H. 
Dehler, Alfred 
Christensen, Albert 
Dehler, Alfred 
Ellison, Harry H. 
Eidsvoog, Fetter 
Fors, Alfred 
Grovefi Albert 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hangen, Arthur 
Hetman, Walter 
Iversen, Ivar 



Jorgensen, Peter A. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Kesler, Karl 
Kathy, A. 
Melgail, M. 
Moren, G. H. 
Nilsson, Edvin 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Persson, .John 
Plesner, Levi J. 
Person, Fritz 
Petterson, J. M. 
Simonsen, Sigvald 
Seblom, John 
Tliorsen, Axel L. 



TACOMA, WASH. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L, Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Unien-Mado CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at hlB old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Katz, Just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wa»h. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesala and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 

Aberdeen, Wath., Letter Li$t. 



Anderson, -1283 
Aalto, Waino 
Andersen. P. C. 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Arntzen, Werner 
Andersen, -1352 
Armstrong, Harry 
Batchall, Alex. 
Brust, Frank 
Behn, Alfred 
Brown, C. 
Christensen, Albert 
Carson, Edward 
Campbell, M. 
Donohue, J. O. 
tOiiksen, -837 
Kd wards, J. T. 
Edwardsen, Anton 
Kissing, B. 
Finth, Richard 
Flatten, James 
Feitz. F. 
Graf, Otto 
Gla.se, Gustav 
Hvid, Hans 
Hansson, Alf. 
Hansen, Jens 
Hansen, Torlelf 
Jensen, Fredrlk 
Jansson, J. 
Jacobsen, Peder 
Johansen, Tobias 
'ensen, Harry 
Klepzig, Otto 
Kallio, Fran 
Dengt&sen, Gottfried 
I.,undmark, Helge 
Ljungberg, Htrman 
Darsen, Peter 
Llnsler. A. B. 
Lindroos, A. W. 
Laining, Herman 



Lalne. Herman 
Larsen, Lars 
Lorsin, G. L,. 
Lauritzen, George 
London, A. 
Mattson, K. A. 
Mortensen, C. 
MacManus, Hugh 
Muller, I. B. 
Miller, Winford 
Mertz, G. 
Muller, Walter 
MacFadden, Wm. 
Mekerman, Ernest 
Nikolin, E. Miko 
Nilson, Jack 
Oksanen, Juko 
Pankliurst, Thos. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pedersen, -1054 
Pedersen, Oscar 
I'etei'sen, Christian 
Petersen, Aago 
Razehelm, Franz 
Ruiige, V. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Sanders, Robert 
Siren, Frans 
Samuelsen, W. 
Speckman, Max 
Schramm, A. 
Siegund. Justus 
■J'liorn, -70 
Quarnstrom, Aleck 
Walley, A. J. 
Zoerb. Walter 
Wintura, Fred 
Packages. 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Sorensen, C. T. F. G. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 



THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 
Seamen's Journal 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Servlcs 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailors' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING. HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



When on Gray's Harbor Smoke 

Grandmont Cigars, lOc. 

Union Pilot, 5c. 

Best Union Made Cigars on 
the market. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St.. Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of Q St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
New Orleans, La. 

Any of the crew of the Santa 
Clara that were in that vessel at 
the time she picked up the steamer 
Roanoke, last April, will please call 
at the office of F. R. Wall, 32 
Merchants Exchange. 

Axel Peterson, F. Lundberg, J. 
Gustafson, M. Garcia, crew of the 
steamer Riverside, at the time she 
lowed in the Oceana Vance, kindly 
call at the office. of the Charles Nel- 
son Co. for money due them. 

Victor N. Kvenen, a native of 
Belgium, age 32, last heard of in 
Ashtabula, Ohio, April, 1909, inquired 
for by his brother John Kvenen, 
Route 2, Raleigh, Tenn. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

4201/2 E- Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS 



LEADING JEWELERS AND 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 



Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

BURNETT BROS., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



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ABERDEEN, WASH. 
DRUGS, BOOKS, STATIONERY 
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Agt. S. F. Examiner, Chronicle & Call 



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HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

A. W. BARKLEY 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

All Union Made Goods 

203-5 G Street, 
Aberdeen ... Washington 




nMAViG^IONI 



*';^ 



Co 



This Book Free 

If you want to know more 
about Navigation, we will 
send this book free to you. 
It tells how young men have 
advanced to better positions 
— how they have climbed 
from small beginnings to 
the highest positions of 
master and officers of sea- 
going craft. It is an inspir- 
ing booklet. 

Mark and mail this coupon 
today. 



inlernatioDal correspondence schools 

Box 898, Scranfon, Pa. 



Please send 
Courses In Oceai 



tiic your Ircr hooklet. explaining ^ 
, Coast, aud Lalcc Navigation. ^ 



♦ Name 

* Sl.&No.. 
I City 




.State_ 



Announcement has just been made 
by the Photo-Engravers' Union of 
New York that the difference which 
has heretofore existed between that 
organization and the Macmillan Com- 
pany, publishers of school books, 
has been satisfactorily adjusted, and 
it is hoped that this matter will be 
given due consideration by the vari- 
ous organizations with which the 
Photo-Engravers' Union had been in 
communcation regarding the trouble. 

A settlement of the molders' strike 
at Cincinnati, Ohio, has been effected 
by International President Valentine 
and the strike committee of the- 
molders and representatives of the 
foundrymen at a meeting • at the 
Grand Hotel. The first demand of 
the strikers was for $3.75 per day, 
i)ut they later modified this demand 
and asked for $3.50 per day with nine 
hours' work. The strike had been 
on for the last six weeks and in- 
volved several hundred. 

The Canadian Department of La- 
bor has under consideration an ap- 
plication for the creation of a board 
of conciliation and investigation 
under the Industrial Disputes In- 
vestigation Act, to deal with matters 
in dispute between the Grand Trunk 
Railway Company and its 1300 tele- 
graphers. The operators have been 
in recent conference with the com- 
pany relative to the adoption of cer- 
tain wages and conditions of em- 
ployment. 

The employes of the Frishmuth 
Tobacco Company of Philadelphia 
have been organized and immediately 
established more favorable conditions 
under which the members of the 
new union will work. In Toledo a 
new Tobacco Workers' Union was 
formed in one of the trust factories 
of that city, consisting of more than 
100 women. The new organization 
will be known as No. 132. The mem- 
bers of the new organization are 
very enthusiastic over the prospects 
for improved conditions, which ap- 
pear to be good. 

E. W. Weeks, Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Brotherhood of Railway Car- 
men of .'\merica, reports that during 
the past two months fifteen new 
lodges of that organization have been 
established in various sections of the 
country, indicating that the men are 
alive to their interests and desire 
to get in shape to properly protect 
themselves and co-operate with the 
various other unions of the Railroad 
Emijloyes' Department. He also 
furnishes information that in the 
near future there will be even ad- 
ditional lodges added to the organi- 
zation. This, however, may be 
slightly retarded as a result of the 
convention, which opens September 
16 in Milwaukee. 

The first general strike of raincoat 
makers, which began at New York 
five weeks ago, has ended by the 
ratification of an agreement with 
the Waterproof Garment Manufac- 
turers' Association. All the inde- 
pendent manufacturers but one or 
two had previously made settlements. 
The strike involved 6,000 workers. 
As a result of the settlement the 
men arc to receive a general advance 
in wages of about 25 per cent, with a 
forty-eight hour working week. The 
piece workers, who are in the ma- 
jority, are to be paid 75 cents an 
hour during the seven months they 
are able to work. The agreement is 
for a year, but will continue until 
either side gives a month's notice 
to change or end it. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Home News. 



Postmaster General Burleson's ap- 
poinlments of postmasters since 
March 4 numbered 5765, the average 
having been 35 a day. 

Representative McDermott, of Illi- 
nois, admitted to the House "Lobby"' 
Committee that he had borrowed 
?dO,000 from a pawnbroker, but de- 
nied all the Mulhall charges of 
"lobbying." 

The California State I'ish Hatchery 
planted during the last year 33,000,- 
000 "fry" or young fish in the 
streams of that State. California is 
among the foremost of the fish cul- 
turists and is doing a valuable work- 
in conserving a cheap food supply. 

Senator Hitchcock's amendment to 
the income tax feature of the tariff 
bill, increasing the levy on large 
corporations, was defeated, 40 to 31, 
none of the Democrats coming to his 
assistance and four Republican Sena- 
tors voting with the majority against 
the proposed change. 

First Lieutenant Moss L. Love of 
the Eleventh Cavalry, U. S. A., one 
of the officers detailed to study avia- 
tion at San Diego, Cal., was dashed 
to death when the aeroplane on 
which he had been sailing shot to the 
ground with fearful velocity from a 
height of about 250 feet. Every bone 
in the officer's body was broken and 
his skull was fractured in three 
places. 

The number of text-books dis- 
tributed free this year to the school 
children of California by the State 
Printing Office has already reached 
the enormous total of 1,139,578, 
which is two and one-half times as 
many as were sold in the same pe- 
riod last year. The total for August 
reached 271.238, which exceeded all 
former records, and the total for the 
past two months is greater than the 
entire sales for last year. 

Anthracite coal shipments in the 
first seven months of 1913 were over 
40.000,000 tons. It is probable, there- 
fore, that this year's production of 
anthracite coal will exceed the high 
record of 1911, which was 69,954,299 
tons, and pass the 70,000.000-ton 
mark. The anthracite coal shipments 
for the first seven months of 1913 
were 40,339,706 tons as against 40,- 
113,648 tons in 1911. The production 
during the last five months of the 
latter year was 29,840,651 tons. If the 
same rate of production is maintained 
this year as in 1911 the total for the 
year will be 70,170,367 tons. This 
increase in production is in response 
to an ever-widening market and the 
usual difficulty in securing anthracite 
coal, because the production is not 
equal to the demand. 

Declaring that armor plate is not 
the only thing for which the Gov- 
ernment has been unmercifully over- 
charged by private manufacturers, 
and that "Uncle Sam'l can save mil- 
lions by manufacturing his own car- 
tridges, field artillery ammunition, 
and field artillery equipment. Repre- 
sentative Tavenner of Illinois has in- 
troduced bills in the House asking 
for a total of $1,030,000 for Govern- 
ment cartridge and ammunition 
plants at the Rock Island Arsenal, 
Rock Island. 111. Representative 
Tavenner declares the Government is 
now paying private manufacturers 
from one-fourth to one-third more 
for small arms cartridges, and from 
one-third to one-half more for field 
artillery ammunition than it can and 
is manufacturing the.sc articles for 
in its own arsenals. 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors. 
Union Office are advertised tor ttiree 
montiis only and will )>e returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. TIoll. Ilead'iu.Tr lers Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Aalto, O. W. -1780 

AhlbcrK, .lohn 

-ManKO, ,Tack 

Alver. Ben 

Ander, G. 

Andersen, A. 

.Andersen. Albert 

-Andersen, Carl 
Osker 

Andersen. Fred 

Anders, Fred 

Andersen, H. .1. 

.Andersen, -1526 

-Andersen, S. P. 

-Anderson. Alex 

.Anderson, Andrew 

Ander.son, Arthur 

-Anderson, Arvid 

-Andprson, Carl 

Anderson, Krnest 

.Ander.son, F. 

-Anderson, -ITT,") 

-Anderson, -1S96 

Bnkber, Haakon 

Rallot, .Tohn 

Banke, H, 

Hnrton, W. F, 

Bastian, Aug, 

Bastion. U, 

Baumert, -2024 

Kausbeck. Erwin 

Bckker, Georpe 

Bellos, ,Iafk -2036 

Bendsen, Harry 

Bensen, Dick 

Benson. A. 

Bentsen, I-ars 

Berg:. Arthur 

Bersiind. E. 

I'.orfrman, Waldeniar 

Berpiiuist, Kmil 

Birtelsen, Aly 

Hessesen, O. 

Bierstet -1736 

Caine. V. 

Callnn. Jose 

rnnibrou. G. C. 

Campbell. I). C. 

Cannon. Alex. 

C.Tnnon, Ed. 

Carlson. I-orens 

Carlson. Carl 

Carlson. Gustag 

Carlson, Henninpr 

C;nlson. ,Toseph 

Carlson, Martin 

Carson. Charlie 

Chaler, Buntlsta 

Da hi, Ben 

Pahler, H. N. 

Pellns. James 

Damkc. Henry 

Danlflsen. Alex 

De Baere. H.arry 

T'e Brun. B. 

I>ehler. Alfred 

Denver. Geo. W. 

Dillon. Patrick 

Rckhoff. Otto 

Kcstorm. George 

Knel.'ind, O, O, 

Rlirinfrer, F, W. 

Kinardt, John 

Kkendahl, W. 

Ekendahl, Chas. 

Ekwall. Gust 

Elhnlm, Peter 

Kllnssen, Rmll 

Elisen, .Sam 

gonJe, S. C. 

Form, Frank 

Fnrs. Alfred 

Fovseren, Karl 

Frnnke. Karl 
, Fraser -740 

Fraudsen, Ij. M. 
' Fredrlchs, C. 

Fredrlok.son. Carl 

Gabrielsen, Peter 

Garrlnen. V. 

Gaukka. August 

Gerlin.an. PJacob 

Gelsior. Joe 

Gerner. Hans 

Gierahn. Robert 

Gllte. Severln 

Giortz. Petrus 

Glannus. Alex 

Gorsch. 'W 

Grana. Collin 

Grant. David 

Ha.aversen. Nils 

Haulers. Fred 

ll.ikassars, A. W. 

llakonsen. .Axel 

Haldin. Fred. 

Halvorsen, Hans 

Hammel, Otto 

Hannus. 

Hansen. 

Hansen. 

Hansen. 

Hansen, 

Hansen. 

H.'insf n, 

Hansen 



Hansen, 
Hansen. 
Hansen. 
Hansen. 
Hanson, 



M. 

C. T. 

Frank 
George 

Gus 

H. 

H. G. 

H. M. 

IT. R. 

Jeremias 

John P. 

-065 
. Oscar 
Harriman, Henry 
Hauser, M. 
Hayes. J. B. 
Havestrom. V. 
Heart. Charles 
Illii.-. Theddy 
IrwinK, James 
Jackson. Harry 
Jaoobsen, Martin 
.lacobsen. O. F. 
Jensen. G. 
.Tanson. Hans 
Jansen. Jens B. 
Jensen. M. C. 
Jnnsen, Nicolaus 
Jensen. Ole 
Janson. Halvor 
Jens. Otto 
Janssnn, P, W, 
Jaracheck, Oswald 
.Tarl . Haakon 
Jensen, C. 



Anderson, -1246 
Anderson, G. 
Anderson. Jim 
Anderson, John 
-Anderson. Josef 
Anderson. O. 
Anderson, Peter 
Anderson. S. 
Anderson. Thorus 

H. 
Anderson, T^no 
Anderson, Victor 
Anderson, Wm. 
Aner. Wm. 
Andreasen, -1477 
Applequest. Otto 
Apslt. J. 
Arndt. Mike 
Arvidsson. Hjalmar 
Asplund. Karl O. 
Axelsen, Herman 
Ayers. W. D, 

Biling. Oskar 
Bilke. Edw. 
Bjornsen, Conrad 
Blodsing, Aug. 
Bluchner. Frank 
Blumol, W. 
Blumn. Niels 
Boardsen. Hans 
Boe. Karl C. 
Boulten. Thomas 
Boyes. C. 
Bradley. CliTord 
Brander. W. 
Brandt. -Andrew 
Brandt. M. 
Bringarud. Harold 
Broscheid. F. O. 
Brownell, W. 
Brusbard. E. 
Bung, Richard 

Chrlstensen, Erling 
Christonsen. Otto 
Christiansen. Peter. 
Christensen, -905 
Christensen. T. K. 
•r'hriste.'sen, Cristens 
Colburn. Geo, 
Connor, Wm. 
Cook. Herman 
Corlev. Howard 
Crist iansen, C. 
Cronin. Oscar 
Cunningham, C. 

Dohmann, Fro.l 
Donovan. John 
Doyle, William 
Dracar. E. 
Dropan, Llhua 
Duchmann, Fred 
Duks. I,. 
Dunbar, T^. Jj. 
Dunbar, L. 

Elliott, Roney 
Engstroni, Ernest 
Rrekson, Chas. E. 
Eriksen -770 
Eriksen -513 
Erikson, Oskar 
Erickson, Eric 
Erikson, Gerhard 
Ericson. E. R. 
Evensen, Martin 

Freeman. C. E. 
Freitay. Franz 

Krpnrti. J<ick 

Fretzen, B. H. 
Frick. John 
Fridlund, John 
Friedrick, Tloinrich 
Frye, Fritz 

Grantley, C. M. 
Grauherg. Fred 
Gravier. E. 
Oriel, Bernhard 
Gudmundseii, B. 
Guldbrandsen. Jack 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gundersen, P. 
Gunn, F. D. 
Gustafson, G. 
Gnthre. R. 
Gutman. Jack 

Heihertz. Emll 
Heiberger. M. 
Held. H. J. 
Heinig, J. 
Helt, I. 

Helsten, A. H. 
Helsten. John 
Henriksen, H. -133:! 
Heiiriksen. Johannes 
H. 11. -2119 
Hermanson -1622 

Herman. Jack 
Hess. Wm. 
Hewitt 

Hildebrandt. August 
Hlllig. Albert 
Hofer, Richard 
Hollowes. I,. N. 
Holt, Carl C. 
Hooner. H. 
Hoosp. Franz 
Hoppiior, -Aliiert 
Hopstad. Sigurd 
Huntsman. Henry 
Hurst. Jack 
Irwin, Robert 
Iversen. John 
Jensen, Charles 
Jensen. H. R. K. 
Jensen. .1. 
Jensen. .Tens 
Jensen. T... 
.Tensen. P. 
.Tenssen, S. W. 
Jespersen. M. 
Joliansen, A. F. 
.Tohansen, .Arthur 
Johansen. C 
.Tohansen. Chas, 
,Tohanson, Kinar M. 
Johansen, Emil 
Johansen, -1081 



.Tohansen, Halvard 
Johansen. -1593 
Johansen. -2021 
Johansen. Thor 
.lohanson. Ole 
.loliaiisen, Oscar 
Joiiansson, .lohan 
Joliansen. H. B. 
Johanson. -2104 
lohanson -280 
.liihnsen. Oscar 
Johnke. Otto 
Johnsen, -1343 
Johnson. -2138 
.Johnson. Bernhard 
Johnson, C. A. V. 
Johnson, C. E. 

Kaare. Juhl 
Kallasnian, E. 
Kalni. Anton 
Kalnin, Ed. 
Kamp, Ed. 
Kargor. Fritz 
Karlsen. Gustav 
Karlsen, Hans 
Karlsen, Martin 
Kasiek. A, 
Kaup. Wenla 
Kearns, H. 
Keinanen. W.alter 
Kelly. I. F. 
Kermagoret. Anatol 
Kern, Max 
Klnnen, A. 

r^acey, Thomas 
1-aino, Frank 
l.angton. Harry 
L.Migvardt, Chris, 
l-aponble. Jean 
Lappe, Georg 
l.arsen. A. B. 
l<.arsen, F. 
1-arf-en. .Tohn 
r.arsen. Louis 
Larson. -176.<? 
r^irsson. Axel 
L.iydon. D. 
Leander. Carl 
Leo. Ole 

Loiilsten, Charles 
I.ekschass, M. 
Loland. F. W. 
Lopsoo, Osear 
Lester, ,L O. 
r^indberg. J. 
Lind, Charlie 
Lindeman, Albert 

Maatson. Olaf 
Mack. Edw. 
M;iekay. Alexander 
Malmquist. Julius 
Manso. Peter 
Marckwardt. Karl 
M.uilon. -Alfred 
Markman. H. 
Martensen, I. C. 
Martens. Paul 
Martin. T. K. 
-Martingsen. R. 
Martin. Jack 
Marton. H. 
Ma.ss. Ernst 
Matsinger, Walter 
Mfitson. Morris 
Mattsnn, .A. M. 
Mattson -1818 
Matt.son, C. J. 
Mayes. J. B. 

N'anjack. Gustav 
Nauman. A. E. 
Naystrom. Victor 
Neas. W. 
Nellsen, J. C. 
Nelson, C, 
Nelson, Ed, 
Nelson, Lewis 
Nelson, N. 0. 
.Nest. Fillp 
Newman, Tom 
Nieml. H. 
Nielsen, Ed. 

Obcrhauser, John 
Ogilvic. Willie 
Olerholm. -867 
Olsen. Andy 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen, Cliarles A. 
Olsen, Emil 
Olsen, Hans -794 
(Jlsen. John 
Olsen, Ludvig 
ol.sen. O. 
Olsen. Olof D. 
Olsen, -1222 

Palilgren. Pete 
I'Mlnier, Fritz 
Patterson. P. A.. 
Paulsen. G. 
Pavlo, Lovera 
Pearson, J. T. 
I'oarson, J. 8. 
Pedersen -l.")61 
Pedersen -1300 
Pelsekhur 
Pernki, C. 
Petersen. Henry 
Petersen, John G. 

Raash, Otto 
Rammerdahl. Knud 
Kansolil, Emil 
Rasnuisson. Emil 
Kasniussen, Jacob 
Rehman. Chaa. 
Redmond, Th. 
Keinliold, Ernest 
Hevid.an. John 
Richter. Niels 
Rily. C. 
Roalsen, Fred 
P.obertsen, R. 
Roche, John 



.Tohnson, C. R. 
Johnson. E. 
Johnson. Frank 
.Idhnson. Isack 
Johnson. J. Julius 
Johnson, -420 
Johnson. John 
Jiilinson. Oscar 
Jolmson, P. 
Johnson, R. W. 
Johnson, Stove 
Johnson, William 
Johnson, Willy 
Jones. Chas. 
Jorgensen. Andrew 
Jorgensen. Fred 
Julison, C. 

Kirkpatrick. Cycil 
Klausen. C. 
Kleibingat, Fred 
Klinker, C. J. 
Kllrberg, Chaa. 
Knappe. .Adolpli 
Kniiiling. F. 
Kohne. Ernest 
Kramer. Fred 
ICrane. Anton 
Kristensen, A. 
Krohn, H. 

Krulisch, Franz Paul 
Krygor. Waldemar 
eKunas. Charlie 
Kydland. Ole 



Lindeman, Gus 
Lind, Gus 
I^lndgren, Gus 
LinH^man. '>. 
Lindliolm, Ciiarles 
l.indquist. -1299 
Lindroth- Carl 
TJscou. C. 
Lister, P. L. 
lyoery. Wm 
Lofgren. Otto 
Lohme, -14S3 
Loining, Herman 
Lorentzen, A. 

Lueliis. 1^. 
Lunl>a\ier. Karl 
Lundberg, F. 
Lundberg, Harr.v 
Lundberg. Thorsten 
Lund. Christopher 
Lundfiuist. A. 
Lundqulst, Ernest 
Lyche, H. 

Mayers. Edgart J. 
McCarty. P 
McKenzie, William 
McM.anUK, J. 
Melgaud. R. 
Merthens. H. 
Meyers. Paul 
M''"kolsen. .Tosef 
MiUeor, Carl D. 
Minor. C. F. 
Moen, Robert 
Mollor. .Tohn 
Morris. Reuben 
Morse. Harry 
Mossier. I.arence 
Mouson, C. 
Murphy. Ch. 
Murphy. Edward 
Murphy. Franclo 
Murray, Wm. E. 



Nielsen. Jacob 
Niel.^on. John 
Nielsen, N. P. 
Nilson. Anders 
Nilsen, C. -641 
Nilsen, Michael 
Nilsen, N. I. 
Nolan. George 
Norris, Will 
Nurga.ard. Anton 
Nylund. Carl 
Nyluiid, John 
Nynian, Oskar 

Olsen. Oscar F. 
Olsen. Otto 
Olsen, Oscar Wil- 

helm 
Olsen. Robert 
Olsson, -677 
01s.son. -1187 
Orfano, Vappo 
Osherg. C. 
Osterhoff. H. 
Otto, Willi 
Ounpun, A. 
Owens, John 

Peterson, Ed. 
Peterson. Frank 
Peterson, H. 
Peterson. Oscar 
Petersson, Chaa. 
Peltersen. Fredrick 
Pettersen. H. A. 
Peltersson, C. H. 
Petterson, Otto 
Pock. James 
Porin, A. L. 
Proschech, Paul 



Rohan, Billy 
Rohland, Max 
Rosbelk, Gustav 
Rosenfeld. Paul 
Rose, W. 
Roslln. R. 
Ross, Bort 
Rounborg, Eilward 
Rudberg. Charlie 
Ruute. O. 
Ryan. J. R. 
Ryilelius, Ralph 
Rylke. Otto 



Saalman, Joseph 
Saastad, H. 
.Salni^la. Julius 
SmIo. Yrjo 
S.iiumis, C. J. 
Samuels. Harold 
Sandstrom, E. 
Saunders. Jas. B. 
Rch.iuer. A. 
Sehcr. G. 
S.hmehl 
Schneider, H. 
Schroeder, Hans 
Sihroodcr. -2601 
.'^chroestor. R 
Schulz. Christian 
Seolt, A. 
Sederholm, Anton 
Senger, George 
Shacer. Ernest L. 
Shallies. Ch.as. 
Shen. William 
Shultman. .Tacob 
Sieveison, .Tohn 
Sifferd. Johannes 
Silva. A. 
Simons, O. L. 
Siversen, Ch. 
S.iohlom. Karl 
Smith. Donald 
Smith, P. O. 
Smith, G. 
Tanimon, Chr. 
Thenrin. John E. 
Thilo, Peder 
Thoisell. Chas, 
Thompson, Ch. 
Tliorle, Ernest 
Thornel, Martin 
Thorne. Richard 
Tliorsen, -Aksel 
Tietjen, B. H. 
Todaiil. Martin 
Tohts, Richard K. 
Uhlig. Carl 
t'rsin. J. 
V'alotinsen, G. , 
Valtti. Jalmar 
Van Katwvk, John 
Van Rosnadnn. 
Volkanen, Veda 
Walch, Michael 
AVallus. Fred 
Walters, Henrv 
Wathsted, Albert 
Welch. L. 
Wendel. Emil 
Wostfall. Ernest 
Westman. Andrew 
Woyor. Paul 
Whinner. W. 
Whitoworth 
Wiekstrom. Axel 
Wil-hlm. Edward 
Yanger. I. 
Zechel. Walter 
Ziohr. Ernest 



Smyth. Win. 
Soder. J. 
Soderlund. Uno 
Solieinn, FrUz 
Sohle. Edw. 
Sohne, Edw. 
•Soionson. H. 
Sorensen, Peter 
Sorers. Hans -2273 
Sovchnes, I'. Olaf 
Speikman. Max 
SpoUor, Henrv 
Splllington. S. L. 
Sping. Jamfs 
Slalliaum, Clark 
Stanford, Max 
Stangeland, Peter 
Stanlland, Herbeit 
Stein, Emil 
Stolzerman. E. 
.Strand. Ixiuis 
.Str.iudquist. L( rus 
Strasdin. H. 
Strauss. Walter 
Sunrtholm. Franz 
Siiii(li|uist. Ernest 
Svonson. -1295 
Svenson, -2675 
Swanson. Chas. 
Swanson. L. E. 
Svvaithey. Jack 
Swarthey, Norman 
Toniman, Chr. 
Tonrersen, H 
Torpensen, Guwald 
Torsgren, Carl 
'I'orstenson. F. 
Tovares, Antonio 
Trantmann. Paul 
Truhack. H. 
Tuck, W. 
Tuppit. C. 
Twalg, F. 
'Ivvede. J. 
T'«ar. T. 
T'solv, I. 
Verney, A. 
Vieon, C. T^ 
Void, O. P. 
Volens. M. 
Voss. Heinrich 
Wilholmson, H. 
Williamson. W. A. 
Wilson. C. J. 
■Wilson, Harry 
Wilsen, .1, 
Wilson, John E. 
Wiltmening. H. 
Wind, Jacob -1351 
Winpc, Hilmar 
Winther. Johaii 
Wolferen. Svan 
Wrig, Ferdinant 

Yoivola 
Zorb. W. 
Zoring, Arthur 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailor*' Union 
of the Pacific. 



.Ahokas. Ulnar 
Anderson, A. 
.Anderson, Anders 
Baldn. A. 
Brander, M. F. 
Boas, Tomas 
Cain. P. 
Oetjer. F, 
Chiistoftersen. 
Ellofsen. Otto 
Faulkner, J. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Han.sen. Karl 
Iversen. Reidar 
Jolianson, Nils A. 
Johnsen, AV. 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
loreensen. Oliiv 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Katwijk. J. W. 
Korsberg. Wolmar 



Lindroth. Erik 
Lundgren. K. G. 
Maatson. Olaf 
Moi-ris 
Nelsson. Hasmuiid 
Olsen. -1244 
I'latwijk 
I'rioberg. P. 
Olaf Quarseil, Win. 
K;i;isch. O. 
RasmuBxen. R. 
Rose. Wm. H. 
Rutter. T. 
Strau.s. Walter 
Torkildsen. Jonas 
Trondsen. J. M. 
Wakely. R. E. 
Walters, A. 
Wolsen, Julius 
Wlllander. -876 



Pt. Townttend Letter Lut. 



.Anderson, K. 1 
.Alango, John 
llermansen, L. 
Johansen, John 
Jolmson, Ole 
Moore. George 



Mortz, Gooige E 
Nachtigall. H. 
Rosbeck, Gustaf 
Shold. Clias. A. 
Varner, C. 
Wilson, Gus 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Andersen, F. K. 

Benson. John 

Bang. R. O. 

Celalia. Vinzenco 

Eriksen, Johan 

llushy, Lars 

Hansen. C. 

Jansson. Carl 

Johansen, Joh.an 

Johanson, E. O. 

Joluansen. A. TO 

Johansen, Amiol 

Seattle, 

Abolln, Adam 

Borgen, K. Sigurd- 
sen 

Iiahi, Ben. 

Fister. Joliannes 

Finnigan, 1. H. 

Hagen, Gunder 
I Jensen, Gustav 

Joliansen, Ingvald 

Jolinson, Axel 

Larsen, Fred 
; Magnuson, P, A. 
[ Nelson, Nels Wil- 
helm 



Lundgreen, G. Karl 
Lundquist, Otto 
Larsen, Julius 
Lidsten, C. 
Ostorlund. Albert 
Olson. Nels 
Peterson, Carl 
Peterson. Frank V. 
Roelfs, J. 
Remmert, J. 
Widlund, O, B. 
Walrath, G. O. 

, Wash. 

Osterlund. Albert 
Olsson. Slgfrid 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phister, Albert 
Polhoine, Mr. 
Ridderstaff, Ernest 
Rye, F. M. J. 
Selback, Chris. 
Slinning, Rasmus O 
Spellman. Tom. 
Starks, John 
Stein, George G. 
Sllxrud, Jack 
Stromsness Oscar 



All Aboard! 
SEABOARD HOTEL 

228 East Street, near Howard 

New Seven-story Concrete Building — Modern and Up-to-Date 

250— ROOMS— 250 



Running Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 

Free Shower and Tub Baths 

ELEVATOR SERVICE— ELECTRIC LIGHT 

Call Bell in Every Room — Fine Lobby and Reading Room 

Open AlT Night 

35c to $1.00 per Day $2.00 to $4.00 per Week 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt 

and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30, 1913: 

Assets $55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 
Employees' Pension Fund.. 158.261.32 
Number of Depositors 62,134 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. 
for receipt of deposits only. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVAN^S 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water in Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICK :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SDNS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen. No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

W. Otto, a member of the crew of 
the barkenttne Klikitat when she got 
wrecked in Hilo Bay, is desirous to 
get in communication with the rest 
of the crew. Address, W. Otto, 
Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 




CAPT. CHAS. J. 
SWANSON 

Classy Clothier 

Hatter and Furnisher 

Douglas Shoes 

Uniforms 



Gold Braid and Gold 

Wreaths of All 

Descriptions 



139 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and 
Washington 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 1082 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 

10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



When Drinking Beer 
See ttiat tliis Label is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 



^}^a m^mt^ ^i^ 



Union 

MADE 

Dffr 




\ 

•Ale 

AND 

Porter 



^S^o Of America r^c^ 

COPYRIGHT ftTRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^^ m /I ^^^V W,^" W~^ '■'^ ^^ See that this label (in light 
^•^ r^^l ff^l 1^^ t^^ li^'^^^bluc) appears on the box in 
^■^•^ ~ A ^— ^ A.^^.^_^M.^^ ** "'which you are served. 



, . . JStPH8803^^^ ^_^ 

"issued by AuUlorily of Uie Cipa/ MaKers' Intefnallonal Union of Amenca. 

Union-made Cigars. 

iHlHUItOf m aom MAIEIS'IKTUIIAIIOHU. union << AMiiu. an oruiiziboii devoted to the ad- 

vincemmloniit MORMMIlERIAlindlMlUICniAIWCLIARiOf ntfCRATl. Jttrtianmitamai 

theje Ciotn to all ynAen Oiroijahout the Morld 

' AD MruigiiMtiu upon this iiM aw be punuhfd MCording toUvt. 



*" SIMILE 



V CHI Vet 



jfAmmca. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

Carlsen ® Marchand 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 
Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 
10 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Bet. East and Steuart Sts. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Lasker Munter, of Spokane, Wash- 
ington, born 1884, left home in 1903, 
is inquired for by his father, Adolph 
Munter, Spokane, Washington. 

John Hansen, who was lookoutman 
on the S.S. "Argyll" some months 
ago, is wanted by the Union Oil Co. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify the manager Marine 
Department, Mr. Walter G. Tubby, 

Michael D. Harrington, who has 
been sailing on the Pacific Coast 
since 1910; last heard of on vessel 
sailing from San Francisco to Seat- 
tle; anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Dennis J. Harrington, 
care of Winthrops Yacht Supply Co., 
Winthrops Beach, Mass. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTLRERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 16C0 



^S^^S^^^S/WS/VWS/W>^V>^»^>^>^S^%/N/S<'SA^V^'V^«^/>^ 




News from Abroad. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Johan Nilsen, a native of 
Sandefjord, Norway, aged about 33, 
left his home at 1164 Potrero Ave., 
Sunday, August 17th Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Coast Seamen's Journal. 



Continual earth disturbances and a 
strong hurricane at Messina, Sicily, 
have inspired fears of a catastrophe. 

A wireless telegraph station has 
been opened at Nassau, Bahama 
Islands. 

The fortilication of the Panama 
Canal was opposed by speakers at 
the Peace Congress at The Hague. 

A massacre of Japanese during the 
fighting in Nanking, China, has in- 
flamed public feeling in Japan, and 

crisis is threatened. 

Chinese rebels at Nanking threat- 
ened to bombard the German con- 
sulate and the German cruiser Em- 
den. 

Japanese landed a force of 100 
marines with half a dozen rapid-fire 
guns on Chinese soil recently to 
protect Japanese residents. 

Three Canadian trappers just re- 
turned from the Arctic declared that 
they discovered the tribe of white 
Eskimos before Vilhjalmar Stcfans- 
son. 

It i^ rumored that a new plot 
against the republic of Portugal, has 
been discovered at Lisbon. A store 
of bombs was found by the police 
and numerous arrests have been 
made. 

P.ombita, most famous of Spanish 
hull fighters is about to retire, hav- 
ing made a fortune of $600,000. He 
claims to have killed 3000 bulls. 
He will make his final ai)])earance 
on October 19. 

Captain Koch, the Danish explorer, 
gave details of his march with three 
companions across Greenland. The 
750-mile journey occupied three 
months amid remarkable alternations 
of weather. Doctor Koch broke his 
leg. 

The predicted passenger war be- 
tween the Hamburg-American and 
North German Lloyd steamship com- 
panies began with the announcement 
that the former would retaliate on its 
rival by establishing a steerage serv- 
ice to Baltimore. 

The Hongkong agent of the Krupp 
Company obtained concession for a 
2S0-mile railway in Yunan, China, a 
monopoly for 20 years on Govern- 
ment contracts for arms and ammu- 
nition and extensive mining privi- 
leges. 

Mrs. Pankhurst, the suffragette 
leader, now at Trouville, France, de- 
clared she would return to England 
after she had regained her strength. 
Miss Sylvia Pankhurst, in a speech 
in London, told the suffragettes they 
should drill, learn jiu jitsu and bring 
sticks to meetings. 

The iiiunicipality of the city of 
Nuremberg, Germany, has granted 
30,000 marks for the immediate insti- 
tution of an insurance system for 
the unemployed. This is to come 
into force as soon as the Government 
declares its willingness to pay half 
the preliminary expenses of the or- 
ganization, which there is every rea- 
son to belicM' will be agreed to with- 
out delay. 

One great eifect of the recent 
B.all-an war on luiropean [jolitics is 
that it will undoubtedly mark a 
change in the distribution of naval 
power in the Mediterranean. Greece 
has already taken the first steps 
toward building a fleet, and for this 
I)urpose has applied to the British 
government for the services of sev- 
eral naval ot'ticers. This request has 
been granted, and as a result a 
number of ofificers representing every 
branch of the service have been 
delegated to that service. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Their Job. — Willie — Paw, what is 
a jury? 

Paw — A body of men organized 
to find out who has the best lawyer, 
my son. — Cincinnati Enquirer. 



"Why don't you establish old-age 
pensions?'-' asked the welfare worker. 

"Don't need 'em," replied the em- 
ployer of child labor. "Our hands 
never live to old age." — Life. 



Putting It Clearly.— "Rastus, what's 
a alibi?" 

"Dat's provin' yoh was at a pray- 
er-meetin' whar yoh wasn't, in or- 
der to show dat yoh wasn't at de 
crap-game whar yoh was." — Life. 



More Interesting. — "I see that the 
new British ambassador's name is 
Spring-Rice," said Bildad. 

"Well, what of it?" growled old 
Moneybags. "What interests me is 
September wheat." — Judge. 



Cautious. — A negro woman in Sa- 
vannah was preparing to get married. 
For four weeks before the ceremony 
she saved her wages and immediate- 
ly after the wedding she hunted up 
her mistress and asked her to take 
charge of the fund. 

"I'll take it, of course," said the 
puzzled woman, "but, Mandy, won't 
you need money to spend on your 
honeymoon?" 

"Miss May," said the bride, "does 
you think I'se goin' to trust myself 
wid a strange niggah an' all dat 
money on me?" — Jones' Magazine. 



"Hoss" Sense.— A traveler in In- 
diana noticed that a farmer was hav- 
ing trouble with his horse. It would 
start, go slowly for a short distance, 
and then stop again. Thereupon, the 
farmer would have great difficulty in 
getting it started. Finally, the trav- 
eler approached and asked solicit- 
ously: 

"Is your horse sick?" 

"Not that I know of." 

"Is he balky?" 

"No, but he is so danged 'fraid I'll 
say whoa and he won't hear me that 
he stops every once in a while to 
listen." — Saxby's Magazine 



Children's Accounts 

Tour children should be taught to 
save. Open an account for each of 
them to-day. Show them by example 
that you believe In a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth, 
San Francisco 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

E(tabll*hed 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
l-louse, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPl'AIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be. even in the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man. and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications. Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN &i CO. 

Baltimore ClotHiiiff Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 



Demand the Union Label 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 







UNION 



MA.DB 




Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 



"New Retail Center" 




\Market at Fifth 



^^>^VN^^S/Ni^/^%^^>^>^^V>^^^^*^WVVS^WVWN/V%'^ 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

60S KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

'THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Jam«33i. Soransan 



Eyes Examined Free Repairing Our Specialty 

WE DO REPAIRING 
JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 Market Street., Near Call Building 

2593 Mission Street. Near 22nd Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

THE LARGEST JEVi/ELRY STORE. WITH THE LARGEST 
STOCK AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

Has Moved from 610 THIRD ST. to 

693 THIRD ST., opposite the 

Southern Pacific Depot at 3d 

and Townsend Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Ooods, Hats. Cap«, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Ktc, Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at ths 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — ^Look for ths Nams 
and Number. 



^'V^*WVS^.^^^^^^V^^^^^^^^^"V\/V^^'WVW^^^WN«S 



CJUfTBDsrui 

OVERALLS & PANTS 

UNION MADE ^ 

jUiGOMUTSHim 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVII, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1913. 



Whole No. 2244. 



WOMEN'S TRADE-UNION LEAGUE. 



The Journal has been favored by Alice Henry, 
editor of "Life and Labor," with the following 
special article descriptive of the origin, work 
and aim of the National Women's Trade Union 
League of America: 

The National Women's Trade Union League 

of America, which is practically a federation of 

C> women trade unionists, had its origin almost ten 

years ago during the meeting of the American 

Federation of Labor in Boston. 

The National League had not been long in 
existence before local leagues were organized in 
Boston, New York and Chicago. Since then 
other Leagues in Baltimore, Springfield, Illi- 
nois, St. Louis, Kansas City and Denver have 
sprung up. Its platform reads: 

1. Organization of all workers into trade 
unions. 

2. Equal pay for equal work. 

3. Eight-hour day. 

4. A living wage. 

5. Full citizenship for women. 

The League is endorsed by the American 
Federation of Labor. 

The first article of the League's platform is 
the organization of women workers into trade 
unions to be affiliated with the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, and while this work is car- 
ried on in the main upon the lines that men 
organizer? pursue, the girl in industry problem 
presents its own special difficulties which the 
experienced women in the local headquarters 
have had to study for themselves. 

All in the labor movement know how much 
difficulty has been experienced by men union- 
ists in organizing women — women who are 
coming into the trades in ever-increasing num- 
bers and who, if unorganized, are in times of 
stress and of strike a serious handicap to the 
success of the men's struggle for better condi- 
tions. So the National Women's Trade Union 
League was begun with the idea of giving the 
closest attention to the organization of women 
while keeping in touch with the men's unions 
and with the American Federation of Labor. 
.A.lthough the work is necessarily slow the 
movement is steadily growing year by year. 

Besides being a federation of trade imions 
which include women members, the League 
draws its members from other groups. For 
instance, any organization sympathetic with its 
objects. It has a large individual membership 
both of trade unionists and of those who, 
though not trade workers themselves, have la- 
bor's viewpoint and are engaged in the service 
of the League's work as allies. The reason why 
organizations and individual members from 
other groups are invited into membership is 
in order to obtain additional support. 

The basis of membership is necessarily some- 
what different from the ordinary labor move- 
ment. With men, the majority of them enter 
industry in boyhood and remain in it all 
through their working lives; and even if a 
man shifts from one trade to another he re- 
mains a wage-earner all the same and what- 
ever he has learned about collective bargaining 
in one occupation he carries over into another, 
so that the question of organizing men, while 



never easy, is at least a problem without other 
complications. Not so when you try to organ- 
ize the women, or rather the girls, who in in- 
creasing numbers are pouring into the trades. 

The average period which the girl spends in 
wage earning is seven years, after this in most 
cases she enters through marriage into the 
home industries and is classed by the census 
bureau as in a non-gainful occupation; but her 
welfare is still a matter of the utmost moment 
lu the nation, and especially does it concern 
the men and women of the working world. 
But since tens of thousands of girls in seven- 
year periods in perpetual succession pass 
through the shops and factories, we must see 
to it both for their own sake and for the sake 
of the men that the girls are organized and 
have a legitimate part in the labor movement. 
Youth and inexperience stand in their way; the 
men, their fellow workers, too often resent their 
presence so that a body which has the organ- 
ization of these workers as its special job has 
plenty of work cut out for it. 

Till the details of the next census appears no 
one will know exactly how many wage-earning 
women there are in the United States. We 
know that there are over six millions, and 
many experts estimate their numbers at eight 
millions. Their average wage has been esti- 
mated at $6.00 a week. In none of the larger 
cities of the United States will $6.00 pay for 
decent food, decent clothing, decent and re- 
spectable shelter, while it allows no margin at 
all for illness, education or recreation. Finally, 
to quote from one of the League's leaflets: 

"Unorganized women in industry lower men's 
wages. Laws protecting working women can 
be fully enforced only when women are organ- 
ized. Workers are the only inspectors always 
on the job, but they cannot report infractions 
without the protection of their union." 

On the other hand: 

"Organization is education. Women in the 
past met their problems as personal — which 
they were. They now, through organization, are 
learning to meet their economic problems as 
social — which they are." 

The largest leagues are in New York and 
Chicago, and a few illustrations selected from 
the extensive work done by those organizations 
will not be out of place. The biggest work that 
has been done in both of these eastern cities 
has been in the assistance they have given to 
various branches of the garment workers in the 
huge strikes which have more than once called 
a halt to industry. 

Those who have had much experience in 
strikes know that winning a strike is the least 
of the battle. The hardest pull of all comes 
afterward. To hold the union together when 
the excitement is over under the petty annoy- 
ances of the shop and friction with foremen, to 
lead the girls to understand all that unionism 
stands for, to encourage the spirit of co-opera- 
tion, loyalty and patience, this is where a 
League can be invaluable. Take, for instance, 
the Chicago League and the Garment Workers' 
strike. The strike was only partially won, but 
when it closed it made possible the practical 
organization of the workers (varying according 



to the season from seven to ten thousand) of 
the Hart, Schafifner & Marx shops. 

The latest agreement signed on April 1, 1913, 
by Hart, Schaffner & Marx and the representa- 
tives of 9000 workers, provides for the Prefer- 
ential Union Shop. This means that the union 
man or woman is given preference over the 
non-union worker in hiring, discharging or in 
the abolishment of sections. 

Just as sound and important work is being 
done all the time with many smaller groups. 
For instance, the straw and panama hat makers 
of New York tried to organize and were met 
by the manufacturers' association with a black 
list. A general strike was declared on February 
25 of the present year. The League members 
were able to give very valuable aid to the 
strikers by assisting in picketing and by attend- 
ing the courts when pickets were arrested. 
This strike was called ofif and apparently lost, 
but the union remains and is far stronger than 
before the strike took place. But better re- 
sults even than this were gained in the strike 
in the potteries in Trenton, New Jersey. The 
Central Labor Union of Trenton and all the 
trade-union men in the city gave splendid co- 
operation to the strikers. They handed over 
the girls to the care of the League organizer 
and under her directions these inexperienced 
unionists did splendid work and helped to bring 
about the satisfactory settlement. This success 
gave heart to the girls in the Strauss Woolen 
and Silk Mill of Trenton. Wages there were 
appalling. They varied from $2.50 to $11.00. 
Many children, nominally fourteen but looking 
very young, were employed. ' The owner of the 
factory at length consented to meet the work- 
ers with the League's organizer in conference 
at the New York headquarters, and after sev- 
eral weeks the strike was settled on the work- 
ers' terms. 

The New York organizer also helped the 
Boston League in the strike of the paper fac- 
tories of Holyoke, Massachusetts. The cause 
of the strike here was an arrangement under 
which eight girls could be got to do the work 
of twelve. Here the workers actually stood 
up for a share of the manufacturer's increased 
profit under the new arrangement, or else that 
the discharged girls should be reinstated. The 
manufacturer chose the latter alternative. 

Even the difficult question of the organizing 
of domestic workers has been taken up. A 
small group has been meeting weekly at the 
Chicago League headquarters under the leader- 
ship of Mary Anderson and Emma Steghagen. 
They now have their charter from the American 
Federation of Labor and are growing steadily. 
The Chicago League also helped to organize the 
bathroom attendants of the public schools with 
a 90 per cent, membership. It is true that 
organization cannot be forced on any group of 
workers, but it is also true that when the 
workers are ready a body of experienced women 
standing ready to help, advise and mother a 
new little union, the hospitable hcadciuarters 
standing open literally night and day, no one 
v*ill deny that these are a powerful aid in ex- 
tending organization among women. 

Among other advantages belonging to the 
(Continued on Page 7.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BY THE WAY. 



It isn't by any means always a safe rule 
to do unto others as we would have others 
do unto us. The matter of personal tem- 
perament enters largely into the question. 
For e.xample, you may be wholly indif- 
ferent to — may even enjoy — a joke on your- 
.self. But woe is yours nine times in ten 
if you venture to repay the attention in 
kind. Other examples proving the weak- 
ness of the Golden Rule might be adduced 
almost ad infinitum. In its practice it is 
well to remember that one man's meat may 
be another man's poison, so closely do the 
workings of the mind conform to those of 
the body. Indeed, the practice of the 
Golden Rule is never a safe proposition 
unless one is by nature gifted with those 
rare attributes of mind which enable him 
when occasion demands it to comply with 
the injunction, Put yourself in his place. 
And it is the rarity of those attributes 
among men that underlies and makes pos- 
sible almost every evil from which the 
world suffers. 



From the September Pearson's Magazine 
we gather the interesting facts that during 
the month of August the United States Sen- 
ate was in session a total of Zi hours and 
40 minutes ; the House 30 hours and 19 
minutes. The average Senate session was 2 
hours and 40 minutes; the House, 2 hours 
and 50 minutes. 

Pretty soft snap, eh, for our distin- 
guished, etc., "public servants"? If they'd 
only not be so durned grumpy about it 
when workingmen ask them for the legis- 
lative boon of a national 8-hour workday, 
much might be forgiven them ; even their 
strenuous loafing on the job of "serving 
the public." Of course, our "servants" 
will plead in extenuation of their luke- 
warmness toward the 8-hour workday that 
there is apparently no need for it, since 
millions of workers are not only willing 
but eager to work 10, 12 and 14 hours a 
day. Which suggests that millions of 
workingmen would be only too happy to 
be sent to Congress to serve the public 
for $7,500 a year — especially on the showing 
of industry made by that body during the 
month of August. 



Compare the picture of what might be — 
if we were wise — with things as they are 
today, when, roughly speaking, 95 per cent. 
of our national wealth is owned by 5 per 
cent, of our population. Then do some 
thinking along the lines suggested by the 
comparison. If your thinking does not 
end in making of you a radical it will be 
because you are shy on red blood. 



These solemn platitudes about "ruling 
ourselves" are just pure punk. In daily 
life we all know that the man who has the 
last say in deciding a question is the fellow 
who decides it. Then how can we say that 
we "rule ourselves" when five men, a ma- 
jority of one of the U. S. Supreme Court, 
can upset any decision which we ninety 
million "sovereigns" may collectively arrive 
at? The situation is analogous to that of 
a man who has thoughtfully (?) had him- 
.self laced up in a straightjacket lest he do 
something which he is earnestly convinced 
will be of great benefit to him. No, 
brother; it's all punk, just as I tell you. 



We do not "rule ourselves." The Consti- 
tution takes good care that we don't. 
That austere instrument is our ruler, and 
the Supreme Court is its prophet. And 
there you are, fellow "sovereigns," who 
fondly imagine that you govern yourselves. 
"Thus far mayest thou go, but no further," 
or there will be the Constitution to pay 
and no pitch hot. 



A Danish law, applying to the baking 
trades, prescribes a maximum working 
time of 10 hours a day for juveniles under 
18 years of age, and forbids night work for 
boys under 16 and girls under 18. It also 
provides for a weekly rest of 24 hours. 
Oh yes, they do some things better in 
Europe, all right. Of all the sweatshops 
in the world our bake-shops are probably 
the sweatiest. This, thanks mostly to that 
august tribunal of latter-day Dogberryism, 
the U. S. Supreme Court, which a few 
years ago declared "unconstitutional" a law- 
enacted by the New York legislature 
making 10 hours the maximum workday in 
bake-shops. Great is the Supreme Court — 
at contravening the expressed mandates of 
the people ! 



Our industrial ills of to-day are chiefly 
due to our trying to conform twentieth- 
century industrial conditions to nineteenth 
and eighteenth-century laws and ideas. 
That is, we are practicing on our body 
politic the crude stunts of Procrustes. 
AN'hich practice, if persisted in long enough, 
must necessarily end in chronic social de- 
formity. Do we, as a people, want to be- 
come more than ever socially and indus- 
trially deformed? If not, for goodness 
sake let's try and catch up with at least 
some of the simplest ideas of modern 
science and economics. Get wise, folks. 



"The effete and decadent nations of 
Europe" can show us a thing or two now 
and then. In Italy, for instance, the whole 
business of life insurance has been taken 
over by the State. Now go thou. Uncle 
Samuel, and do likewise, and so save thy 
loyal nephews and nieces from the rapacity 
and rascalities of the private life insurance 
ring. Get busy. Uncle, we beseech thee. 



A non-partisan party is a party where 
the party of the first part and the party of 
the second part agree to partition the jobs 
of the hated party in power among them- 
selves. 



Happiness is the pursuit and striving 
after what we imagine is happiness. When 
the pursuit ends disillusionment begins. 
Wherefore "all is vanity" — save the vanity 
(if pursuing happiness. 



-Men must be taught as though you taught 

them not, 
.\nd things unknown proposed as things 

forgot. — Pope. 



There is plenty of room at the top. 
That's mostly because those who got there 
first pulled the ladder up after them. 



The pen is mightier than the pick and 
shovel. 



IS SOCIAL JUSTICE WANTED? 



"A dollar saved is a dollar earned"; but 
a good deal oftener it's just a dollar stolen. 

El Tuerto 



The latest argument against equal suf- 
frage is that women voters will seriously 
try to better social conditions. That looks 
more like a recommendation than an ob- 
jection, but it is seriously oflFered by Miss 
Alice Hill Chittenden, president of the New 
York State .A.nti-Suft'rage .\ssociation. Miss 
Chittenden is reported by the .Associated 
Press to have delivered an official state- 
ment at Washington on July 13, in which 
she said : 

Creating the millennium with the ballot and 
regarttless of the staggering cost, has been Cali- 
fornia's beautiful dream since woman suffrage 
carried the State eighteen months ago. Chil- 
dren are not to be separated from their parents 
because of their poverty. The State is to subsi- 
dize the home. School teachers are to be pen- 
sioned. Old people are to receive an annual in- 
come. Prisoners are to be paid for their work in 
the jails. A regime of ease and comfort is to 
dawn in the Golden State. And then everybody 
in the community will be happy— except the 
ta.xpayers, who must become paupers or crim- 
inals before they can draw dividends on their in- 
vestments in California's Utopian scheme. 

Miss Chittenden does not criticize the 
measures she mentions because they are 
wrong me; hods of securing possible and 
desirable results. She sneers at them as 
efforts to bring about something she re- 
gards as ridiculous, something she sees 
fit to derisively describe as "a regime of 
ease and comfort." If it is true that the 
women voters of California have forced 
the State into experiments with that end 
in view, then they are showing a most 
commendable spirit in spite of the fact that 
the specific measures championed are not 
correct solutions of the problems for which 
they are intended. 

Miss Chittenden's sneers are meant for 
such measures as mothers' pensions, teach- 
ers' pensions, old age pensions and pay- 
ment for prisoners. It happens that all of 
these measures have been pushed in States 
where equal suffrage does not prevail, as 
well as in California. Out of nineteen 
States which have adopted Mothers' pen- 
sions, for instance, twelve have not yet 
adopted equal suffrage. Miss Chittenden, 
to be consistent, must object to male suf- 
frage in these States as strenuously as she 
objects to equal suffrage in California. 

If woman voters, or other voters, should 
actually bring about a regime in California 
under which ease and comfort will be pos- 
sible to attain only by those who consent 
to become paupers or criminals, it would 
be a ridiculous and unjust condition. But 
would it be as ridiculous or unjust as con- 
ditions under which even the ablest and 
most industrious of workers are not always 
sure of a chance to earn a living? That 
seems to be the actual prevailing condition 
everywhere. More power to the voters who 
wish to change it. They will surely learn 
in time the just and proper solution of ex- 
isting evils, one that will open other ways 
than through pauperism and crime to "a 
regime of ease and comfort." — The Public. 



The importance of the copper mining 
industry to South Australia may be gauged 
from the fact that the value of the copper 
produced from the mines of the State dur- 
ing the past ten years has aggregated 
£4,407,296. Last year, owing to the high 
price ruling, there was an encouraging re- 
vival of the industry, and w-ork at a num- 
ber of mines which had been shut down 
for various reasons was restarted. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Arbitrary and Untenable. 
Judge Alfred Murphy has just made his 
report to Governor Ferris of Michigan 
regarding his investigations as to condi- 
tions prevailing at Calumet and other 
mining towns in that vicinity. He says : 
"The men have grievances that should be 
remedied. The employers insist on refusing 
in their individual discretion re-employ- 
ment to any striker who has engaged 'in 
acts of agitation,' or who has 'incited there- 
to.' To agitate for improved conditions, 
to agitate for the right of employes to or- 
ganize, to agitate for any legitimate end is 
the right of every citizen. To penalize the 
exercise of that right by refusing employ- 
ment throughout the copper country to any 
striker is to put him and his family upon 
that community practically without em- 
ployment. It is wrong, fundamentally and 
wholly wrong in principle. In policy noth- 
ing so much reminds me of it as the ob- 
truse course of the Bourbons. It would 
put the strikers who return to work in the 
position of sacrificing their fellows who had 
been loyal in a common cause. The posi- 
tion of the employers that withdrawal from 
membership in the Federation must be a 
condition precedent to re-employment in 
equally arbitrary and untenable. In prin- 
ciple, if any employer can do this, he can, 
with like propriety, compel withdrawal 
from any political, religious, or social body 
as a condition of employment. It is 
basically un-American. In this tense sit- 
uation, where power should be used gen- 
erously and gently, it is a policy which will 
set men's teeth, evoke in the strikers the 
spirit of loyalty and sacrifice, and make 
them ready to sufifer desperate hardships 
before acknowledging any such right in the 
employer. The respective conditions con- 
cerning wages, hours, and other conditions 
of labor are attended by many considera- 
tions, and by dififerent factors in different 
mines." 



Will Continue the Battle. 

The soldiers still continue active in pro- 
tecting the few scabs who are working in 
the copper mines of Michigan. No serious 
outbreaks have occurred since the killing 
of the young girl several days ago. At 
Kearsarge mounted artillery scattered men 
and women pickets, riding down those who 
refused to move from the posts. Such 
pickets as were on duty were prevented 
from approaching strikebreakers either on 
their way to or from the mines. The 
militia and "deputies" are according the 
same treatment to pickets throughout the 
copper country, but in spite of their efforts 
to discourage the strikers and depress them, 
they have on several occasions held very 
largely attended parades. The militiamen 
are charged with having vigorously used 
the butts of their rifles on strikers at 
Larium when they attempted to interfere 
with the strikes' progress. In order to 
been ordered. The force of militia has been 
widely circulated through the press that or- 
ders have been given for woolen uniforms 
for 500 men; sweaters and gloves have also 
been ordered. Th fore of militia has been 
reduced to 500, and General Abbey has an- 
nounced that it will be maintained at that 



figure until a settlement of the strike is 
reached. Notwithstanding these prepara- 
tions for a winter campaign on the part of 
the State, the men are by no means dis- 
couraged, as the contributions are coming 
in freely, and sufficient funds will be fur- 
nished by the various appeals sent out to 
keep the wolf from the door for some time 
yet. The United Mine Workers of Illinois 
have just deposited $100,000 to the credit 
of the leaders in the strike district. 



Insist on Discipline. 

For the first time in the history of Ger- 
man labor unions a meeting of leaders has 
decided against a strike undertaken by a 
local union and ordered the men to return 
to work. The case is that of the metal 
workers at the shipyards of Hamburg who 
recently struck against the consent of their 
leaders. The leaders of the German Metal 
Workers' Union, therefore, met in Berlin 
to the number of about 150 to take action. 
It was generally expected that they would 
be obliged, if only for the sake of pre- 
serving the esprit de corps of the organiza- 
tion, to approve of the strike. On the con- 
trary, by a vote of 126 to 18, they passed 
the following resolution : "This extraordi- 
nary general meeting of the German Metal 
Workers' Union declares, after hearing the 
statements of the Executive Committee and 
of the members employed in the shipyards 
who left work without the consent of the 
Executive Committee, that this action is 
not compatible with the principles of union 
tactics and discipline. It condemns the 
procedure adopted by those members most 
emphatically, as this does not appear cal- 
culated to increase the fighting strength of 
the union in face of the united action of 
the employers in the metal industry." 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Stone Cutters Amalgamate. 

General President Sam Griggs, of the 
Journeymen Stone Cutters' Association, 
writes : "After endless striving for the last 
thirteen years at the cost of thousands of 
dollars against a dual organization, which 
has been maintained by the employers, for 
the purpose of keeping the stone cutters di- 
vided, an agreement has at last been 
reached. Officers of the Journeymen Stone 
Cutters' Association have succeeded in 
wiping out of existence entirely this dual 
body, which has caused untold hardships 
to be endured by the members of the legiti- 
mate organization of stone cutters, char- 
tered by the American Federation of La- 
bor. This elimination is the result of an 
agreement entered into with the employers, 
who formerly employed members of the 
dual organization, and is to the efifect that 
they will turn over all of their shops to our 
Association and in the future will employ 
only members of the Journeymen Stone 
Cutters' Association ; and it is further 
agreed that all members of the independent 
union, about 2,000, will be admitted as 
members of our Association on the pay- 
mc'nt of a stated initiation fee. This agree- 
ment and the consequent elimination of the 
independent union practically assures our 
Association 100 per cent, of organizations 
throughout the United States and Canada. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

Atlantic District 

Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Association, Ij/^A 
Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
Atlantic, 42 Soutli St., New York. 

Harbor Boatmen's Union, 214 West St , New 
York, N. Y. 

Lake District. 

Lake Seamen's Union, 570 West Lake St., 
Chicago, 111. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
Great Lakes, 71 Main St., BuflFalo, N. Y. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Union of Great 
Lakes, 55 Main St., BuflFalo, N. Y. 

Pacific District. 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 84 Embarcadero. 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders of 
the Pacific, 91 Steuart St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association of the 
Pacific, 42 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Alaska Fishermen's Union, 93 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 

United Fishermen of Pacific, Box 42 Seattle 
Wash. ' '^'=''"'*=' 

Bay and River Steamboatmen's Union, 10 
Embarcadero, San Francisco, Cal. 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia: 
29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 
1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 
Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 
Paimerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 
Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 
Maritime BIdg., Melbourne, Victoria. 
Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 
26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 
Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 
Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 
Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 
Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Road, London E 
England. ' ' 

Hull Seamen's and Firemen's Union, 1 Rail- 
way St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships.' Stewards, Cooks 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland BIdgs 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St Pieter- 
soliet 8. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin P. O. 16, Germany. 

FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, Paris, 33, rue 
Grange aux-Belles. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bond. 3 Quay Videcog, Havre. 

NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros, og Fyrboder Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Kobenhavn, Toldbod- 
gade 15, Denmark. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, Kobenhavn, St. An- 
napalads 22, Denmark. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 

ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavo>atori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza L. Marzellino 6^2, Italy. 

AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehr.-ar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 

SPAIN. 

Federacion Nacional de Obereros de Mar de 
Buques v puerto, Barcelona Mayor, 44, 2, 1 
(Barceloneta), Spain. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad de Resistencia de Foguistas, Monte- 
video, Calle 25 de Agosto No. 219, Uruguay. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




According to the statistics pre- 
pared by the Labor Department of 
Chile, thirteen strikes took place in 
that country in the first half year of 
1912; 9,700 persons were involved in 
these strikes, which lasted altogeth- 
er 105 days. Most of the strikes 
were for increases in wages, but in 
two cases same were entered upon 
in order to compel the employers to 
reinstate fellow workers who had 
been victimized. Of the thirteen 
strikes, two were successful, seven 
partly so, whilst four ended in de- 
feat for the workers. 

The annual report of the Austrian 
Trade Union Commission for 1912, 
which has just been published, com- 
ments with satisfaction upon the in- 
crease in the number of members 
from 421,905 to 428,363, which latter 
number includes 50,416 female work- 
ers. This increase seems to be rath- 
er a small one, but one must take the 
Balkan war, and the fact that the 
modern trade-union movement in 
Austria has, during the past few 
years, been hampered by internal dis- 
sension, into account. Further, the 
all-absorbing imperialism was not 
without its effect upon the move- 
ment. 

The second report of the Labor 
and Industrial Branch of the Aus- 
tralian Commonwealth Bureau has 
recently been published. According 
to same, there were 621 separate un- 
ions in the six States up to the end 
of 1912, with a total membership of 
433,224, including 17,670 females. 
Two unions were interstate organiza- 
tions. The membership of the seven 
greatest unions aggregated 32,335. 
A marked increase in . both unions 
and members has been recorded dur- 
ing the last three years; Syi per 
cent, of the 224,023 workers included 
in these statistics were out of work 
in 1912. 

One of the oldest trade unions in 
the world, the North of England 
Trimmers and Teamers' Association, 
has decided to amalgamate with the 
National Union of Railwaymen, one 
of the largest trade unions in the 
world, and also one of the oldest. 
Formal application for admission to 
the larger organization has been 
made, and the matter will be consid- 
ered at the next meeting of the N. 
U. R. Executive. The membership of 
the latter now stands about 225,000, 
and that of the smaller union at 
.2,000. At the present time the small- 
er society is involved in a dispute on 
the North East Coast, which threat- 
ens to paralyze the transport indus- 
try in that district if a settlement 
is not reached. 

From the department of the in- 
terior of the Dominion government 
comes a booklet containing reliable 
and interesting information con- 
cerning Canadian immigration. It 
appears that in the twelve months 
ending with last March 400,000 
strangers arrived in the country. 
This rate was never exceeded in the 
United States when its population 
was less than 40,000,000. The Uni- 
ted Kingdom contributed 150,000 of 
these immigrants, the United States 
139,000. and Continental Europe 112,- 
000. From this it appears outright 
that 289,000 of the 400,000 are of 
the class that are least difficult of 
assimilation; a large percentage of 
the continental immigrants were of 
equally acceptable stock, and yet the 
remainder were no more desirable 
on the other side of the line than 
they would be on this. 



SAN PEDRG. CAL. 

Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... g^N PEDRO 

M. BROVS/N 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 PROINT STREET SAIN PEDRO 






m 



S. G. SWANSON 




1^ For High Class 

Union Label Tailoring 



641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 
Next door to postoffice 

Los Angeles "Waterfront" 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one ''n a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

W* Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



This is to certify that on the 27th 
day of February, 1911, one Mathias 
Lagman, then nineteen years of age, 
was a seaman on board the S. S. 
"Paloma," Cuban flag; that when said 
vessel was lying at anchor in the 
Port of Cabarian, P. R., at about 8 
o'clock in the evening, Lagman, who 
had been working with other men at 
painting, was walking between decks 
in the dark, when he fell through 
hatch No. 4, which had been left un- 
covered. He was picked up in the 
hold and it was found that he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. This 
young rtian was subsequently taken 
to Russia, where his mother, who is 
very poor, is taking care of him. 

It is believed that the owners were 
negligent in failing to have the hatch 
covered, and in failing to have or 
furnish proper lighting for the 'tween 
decks at the point where Lagman 
fell. If these facts can be proven, 
some relief might be obtained for this 
unfortunate boy. 

The following are the men who 
signed on the articles with Lagman, 
and who had been working with said 
Lagman: 

C. Jones, C. J. Johnson, F. Johan, 
M. Lanhard, E. Randal, W. Paulson. 

Any seaman who will locate these 
men or send their addresses to the 
Legal Aid Society, No. 1 Broadway, 
New York City, will be doing a 
great favor to said sailor, and to 
S. B. Axtell, attorney-in-charge. 

For similar reasons we desire to 
communicate with the following men 
who were members of the crew of 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Gal. 

DeaJerC in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agenta 

Harbor Steam Laundry 

ALEX. K.\NE C. A. BRUCE 

WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

Don't forget the 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, Edw. -1739Kroman, M. 

Anderson, Alarius Kallas, M. 

Andersen, Morris Lang, C. 

Anderson, Gust Lindberg, BJlly 
Anderson, W. -1630 Lewis, George 

Andersen, A. -1645 Leideker, C. 

Allen, August Lauritson, George 

Andersen, A. P. Lindeberg, Ernest 

Annell, Albert Lemke, Richard 

Anderson, Ernst Lewet, Frenchle 

Anderson, David Linderman, Gust 
Anderson, HemmlndLindgren, Gust 

Anderson, Lewis Lister, W. 

Anderson, Patrick Livingston, F. 

Andersen, P. Loining, Herman 

Anderson, Sam Lutzen, W. 

Anderson, Soren Mayer, W. 

Hringsund. Harald Makinen, Oskar 

Belirsln, Jacob Maatta, John 

Bergh, Borge Moulas, Nick 

Bengtsson, C. -1924 Merleult, Gaston 

Benson, Helge Mickelsson, A. -1105 

Berhus, Emil Miller, John 

Ruchtman, F. Mohle, N. S. 

IJlakstad. Ed. Nichols, Walter 

Cristensen, H. ..elsen, Julius 

-1366 Nelson, Ernest 

Casasio, Joe Nelson, Hans 

Carlsson, Aksel Olsen, Ferdinand 

-1220 Olsen, Oswald 

Chifpman, Wealie Olsen, W. 

Coilberg, C. Ogilvie, Wm. 

Doyle, W. Olsen, Sckutar 

iJischler, Peter Owen, Fred 

Dougal, A. Olsen, Marias 

Davidson, W. Olsen, Olav 

Dreger, Jack Olsen, Nick 

Ekholm, F. Pekman, Ernest 

lOckart, T. G. Peterson, Oscar 
Eriksson, C. -333 (Reg. L.etter) 

Farrell, Henry Persson,. Hjalmar 

Flebe, Fritz Repson, E. 

Falbom, Richard Rajala, Wictor 

Felsch, Charley Reshe, G. H. 

Flanagan, Jack Sandblom, Konrad 

Forjensen, Olaf Samuelson, Wivtor 

Orantley, Mr. Sandstrom, O. H. 
(Jutman. Jack -1810 

Cionlund, Oskar Simpson, L. O. 

-414 Smith. William 

llolmstrom, Fritz Schroeder, Hans 

Hjorth, Knut Sanne, Rudolph 

Hausman, Mr. Sauders, Swedrup 

Hansen, C. Sevardseh, E. 

Hansen. Pete -1877 Sievers, G. P. 

llass. James Smith, H. D. -2015 

Halvorsen, O. Staar, Chas. -2601 

Hansen, Herald Sundqulst, E. Au?. 

Hansen, Johannes Thogersen, Ped^r 

Hansen, Martin H. Thorsen, Joe 

Helenius, Oskar Torgersen, .\nton 

Hintza, Yrjo Ulappa, Kosti 

Holtsman, Harry Warkala, J. 

.lohansson, J. -2266 Wilemson, H. 

Jorgensen, Fred Willis. F. P. 

Jensen, Jens B. Wirtanen, Charles 

•lohansson, Fritz W. Werner, Paul 

Jonasson, O. M. Wene, K. J. 

Johansen, Walter Zorning. Arthur 

Jensson, John -2203 Zoe, F. 
Johnson, Ben Packages and 

Johnson, Fred Photos. 

Johnson. Andrew Anderson, Hilding 

Kumlander, Emil Kroman. M. 

Kalnin, E. Larsen, Jaines Chr. 

Klahn, K. Nordman, John 



Honolulu, H. T. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 
Light and ventilation perfect. 
Cool and pleasant at ail seasons. 

CIGARS TOBACCO SOFT DRINKS 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address, 
Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco. 
Cal. 

Adolf Theining, a native of Van- 
nersborg, Sweden, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

NOTICE. 

Any sailor or fireman having bag- 
gage stored with John Krehmke, 407 
Drumm St., will please call on Mrs. 
John Krehmke, 1209 Central Ave., 
Alameda. Baggage to be kept 60 
days from to-day, then sold to de- 
fray expenses. 

MRS. JOHN KREHMKE. 

1209 Central Ave. (Martin Station), 
Alameda. 



the "Lyman M. Law" in October, 
1911, when Edward S. Tennberg was 
severely injured on the trip between 
Boston and Norfolk: 

Adolph Dittmer, John Olson, Har- 
old Herman, Charles Newberg, James 
J. Kelly. 



Albrect, Chas. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, M. C. 
Andowety, H. 
Anderson, B. 
Anderson, C. E. 
Anderson, E. K. 
Anderson, A. 
Berthele, M. 
Baker, M. 
Bode, W. 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, A. 
Christensen, A. 
Clausen, J. 
Colbert. M. J. 
Douglas. G. A. 
Eilgeston, C. J. 
Elilert, An. 
Eaton, Neva I. 
Glaaormither, C. 
Gordon, James 
Hansen, Pet. 
Ilaralsen, W. 
Hanson, Jorg. 
Hansen, Christ. 
Haven, Francis 
Hevaroso, H. B. 
Hapstad. Sigurd 
Irwin, Robert 
Ivans, Carl 
Trike, Willie 
Jensen, Hans 



Karlson, Hans 
Karlsen, Oskar 
Kjassgaard, Hans 
Langer, Robert 
Laymbrag, H. 
Lintlanen, Ernest 
Lindberg, T. 
Ludwigsen, Arne 
Marx, Albert 
Machado, H. 
Mafo. E. S. 
Methenen, E. K. 
Olander, Carl 
(Jlsen, J. H. 
Person, Edmond 
Pitschkun, W. 
Pelusan, D. B. 
Russell, W. 
Reinink, H. 
Rasmundsen. G. 
Silhus, W. 
Slan, C. 
Schifr, Ch. 
Sorensen, B. 
Suvert, H. 
SJablom, G. 
Stenars, A. W. 
Salversen, S. 
Schates, A. 
Vilvot, J. 

Williamson, R. A. 
Zornow, Herbert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Albert Christensen, native of By- 
rum Laso, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco in 1910, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, H. C. Christensen, 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home, San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



It is reported that Commissioner-General 
of Immigration Caminetti will visit Tacoma in 
the near future to look into Tacoma's claims to 
be designated a port of entry for Chinese. 

The contract for repairing the German bark 
"Thielbek" was awarded to the Portland Boiler 
Works, their bid of $7,250 being the lowest; the 
work is to be completed in twenty-two days. 

Nearly all the vessels comprising the fishing 
fleet which each spring sails from San Francisco 
and Seattle to the dififerent parts of Alaska, 
have returned with their catches for the sum- 
mer. 

The largest halibut schooner built on the 
Coast this year and the largest in the Puget 
Sound fleet will be the new 100-footer being 
designed for the Welding and Independent 
Fisheries Company. 

Strong rumors are current that the Great 
Northern is likely to operate several steamers, 
including the liner "Minnesota," between Vic- 
toria, Vancouver, and the Far East, to act in 
direct competition with the C. P. R. 

Hope that the schooner "El Dorado," lumber 
laden from the Columbia River for Antofagasta, 
will ever reach her destination, has practically 
been abandoned. She sailed from the river 
April 1 and has been out 168 days. 

As a result of the recent loss of the steamer 
"State of California" in Alaskan waters. United 
States Senator Miles Poiridexter, of Washing- 
ton, is preparing a resolution providing for the 
charting and lighting of all Pacific Coast points 
that are. still uncharted or nnlighted. 

The new steam schooner "Solano," the latest 
addition to the coastwise fleet, arrived at San 
Francisco on September 16 from North Bend, 
where she was built for the Hart-Wood Lumber 
Company. The vessel, which will be engined 
here, was towed down the coast by the steamer 
"Avalon." 

Partly as a result of the phenomenally suc- 
cessful salmon season on Puget Sound and fol- 
lowing the development of the local halibut in- 
dustry boat builders have a surplus of orders 
for new fishing craft and already approximately 
$1,000,000 of new boat-building and outfitting 
is in sight for the coming season. 

Announcement is made at the British Colum- 
bia Marine and Fisheries Department that the 
big concrete first-order lighthouse, recently com- 
pleted at Langara Island, has been placed in 
operation. It will flash every five seconds. 
The fog alarm at the Langara lighthouse will 
give a blast of five seconds, with a silent 
interval of fifty-five seconds. 

Sustaining charges of unskillful navigation in 
connection with the wreck of the steam tug 
"Kayak" of the Seldovia Salmon Company off 
Ocean Cape, near the entrance to Yakutat Bay, 
Alaska, on Augu.st 26, United States Steamboat 
Inspectors Captain B. B. Whitney and R. A. 
Turner suspended the license of Captain John F. 
Wall, master, for three months. 

The steamer "Humboldt" will be converted 
into an oil burner and the cabins will be re- 
arranged in preparation for next summer's 
Alaska business, according to Max Kalish, man- 
ager of the Humboldt Steamship Company. The 
"Humboldt" will be withdrawn from the Alaska 
run early in January and sent to San Fran- 
cisco. 

This fall's catch of salmon is said to be the 
largest the packers and fishermen of the Colum- 
bia R'iver have ever experienced in the his- 
tory of fall fishing. Within the twenty-four 
hours ending September 14 all the canneries on 
the lower Columbia were blocked so that they 
were refusing to receive more fish pending the 
time when they were clear again. 

The new Canadian Pacific liner "Empress of 
Asia," reached Victoria August 30 on her maiden 
voyage from Liverpool, which she left July 14, 
proceeding via South Africa and Hong Kong. 
In exterior appearance she is the exact duplicate 
of the "Empress of Russia." The interior is 
wholly different, the decorations being early 
English, whereas the decorative scheme of the 
sister liner is French. 

The San Francisco Harbor Commissioners has 
formally accepted pier 28, at the foot of Harri- 
son street, which has just been completed at a 
cost of $358,400. It is of concrete, 800 feet long 
and 200 feet wide, and will be assigned to the 
Matson Navigation Company. This is the second 
of the five new all-concrete piers completed and 
accepted, and three others are in course of con- 
struction. 

The revenue-cutter "Tahoma" arrived at Se- 
attle on September IS from Dutch Harbor, 
.Alaska, with Frederick M. Chamberlain, a natur- 
alist of the United States Bureau of Fisheries, 
who was stricken with tuberculosis while he 
was engaged in taking the census of fur seals 
on St. Paul's Island, one of the Pribilov rooker- 
ies. The "Tahoma" had special orders to bring 
Chamberlain south. He showed decided im- 
provement during the voyage, but is still seri- 
ously ill. 

.Arrangements have been completed to estab- 
lish the first submarine signaling bell in Brit- 
ish Columbia waters on board the Sandheads 
lightship, at the mouth of the Eraser River. 



Following the decision of the Marine and Fish- 
eries Department to have these bells operating 
in these waters it is understood that the dif- 
ferent steamship companies will order instru- 
ments for all their ships. If the bell proves 
satisfactory others will be established at other 
dangerous British Columbia places. 

The wrecked steamship "Curacao," of the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company, which lies 
at Warm Chuck, about thirty miles from Fish 
Eggs on the west coast of Prince of Wales Is- 
land, where she struck an uncharted rock 
June 21, has been purchased by the Vancouver 
Dredging & Salvage Company. No attempt 
was made by the underwriters to raise the ves- 
sel on account of her condition, and she was 
sold as she lies at Warm Chuck. The "Curacao" 
was a steel steamship, 241.3 feet long, built at 
Philadelphia in 1895. 

Two schooners arrived at San Francisco on 
September 18 from Siuslaw River, having made 
the run down the coast in steam-schooner time. 
They were the "Hugh Hogan" and the "Sau- 
salito" lumber laden to G. W. Beadle. In spite 
of the fact that her rudder was disabled by 
bumping on the bar while passing out of the 
river, the "Hugh Hogan" made the run here in 
three days. Skillful handling of the canvas kept 
the vessel on her proper course, although the 
rudder was out of commission. The "Sausalito" 
logged seventy-three hours. 

Captain R. Jepsen of the Pacific Navigation 
Company's steamer "Harvard," was fined $400 or 
180 days in the County Jail by Judge Ray L. 
Chesebro in the Los Angeles police court on 
September 16. The fine was paid. Captain 
Jepson pleaded guilty early in August to a 
charge of exceeding the speed limit prescribed 
for navigating vessels in the inner harbor and 
was placed on probation, with instructions to 
report weekly to Don Fugit, port v>'arden. Cap- 
tain Jepson failed to obey the court's instruc- 
tions and the fine imposed this morning was 
the result of that failure. 

Award of the contract to repair the Nor- 
wegian steamer Fagelund, damaged August 24, 
while in collision with the German bark Thielbek 
on the Columbia River, was made to the Seattle 
Construction and Dry Dock Company. The 
Seattle shipbuilding company bid approximately 
$17,000 with a time guarantee of complete re- 
pairs under the specifications within twelve days. 
Portland bidders were the Willamette Iron and 
Steel Company, which asked $19,000 to finish 
the job in twenty-one days, and the Albina 
Engine and Machine Works, which bid $14,551, 
with no time limit. The Fagelund is rated to be 
worth $300 per day to her owners. 

The first cargo of lumber from Alaska was 
brought to San Francisco during the past week 
by the steamer "Melville Dollar." It is pre- 
dicted that the Alaska lumber trade, hitherto 
confined almost solely to supplying the local 
demands, will speedily develop into a big con- 
nection. Spruce and yellow cedar, the latter a 
high-grade cypress, are said to abound in the 
northern canyons and along the creeks. Spruce 
trees average about eight feet in diameter, while 
the yellow cedars strike a mean of about five 
feet. The spruce afifords the finest kind of 
lumber for the manufacture of piano sounding 
boards, while it is a wood capable of taking a 
high polish. 

Torn to pieces in the machinery of the steam 
schooner "Santa Barbara" was the terrible fate 
of William Swan, assistant engineer of the ves- 
sel, which reached San Francisco on September 
17 with news of the tragedy and the mangled 
remains of the unfortunate man. The tragedy 
occurred on September 16, while the "Santa 
Barbara" was en route from Willapa Harbor 
for this port. Swan was alone in the engine- 
room at the time of the accident and no one 
observed his fall into the revolving machinery. 
It is believed that he slipped on a runaway and 
losing his balance plunged into the pit. Swan 
was 53 years of age and had operated on the 
Coast as an engineer for many years. He 
leaves a widow at Los Angeles. 

Captain Thomas H. Cann, Jr., was exonerated 
from blame for the wreck of the Pacific Coast 
Steamship Company's steamer "State of Cali- 
fornia," which was lost in Gambier Bay, Alaska, 
August 17, with a loss of thirty-one lives, in the 
report of United States Inspectors B. B. Whit- 
ney and R. A. Turner, made public at Seattle 
on September 13. The report says Captain Cann 
was following the usual track near midchannel 
and had every reason to believe the course was 
safe. The inspectors suspended for three 
months the license of Captain William Thomp- 
son of the steamship "Curacao" because of fail- 
ure to maintain proper discipline, which resulted 
in the sinking of the ship after she struck an 
uncharted rock on the west coast of Prince of 
Wales Island, Alaska, June 21. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an oflfi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention 324 Merchants' 
Exchange BIdg., Third Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; 

(Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 

EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Branch: 
NEW YORK CITY, 40 South St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 

BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



CHICAGO, 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 

Headquarters: 
HI., 570 West Lake St. 



Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. T.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St 
N. TONA WANDA. N. T., 152 Main St 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbridge St East 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAT CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. T., 70 Isabella St 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON, Mich.. 617 Water St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. • 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St 
OGDENSBURG. N. T., 70 Isabella St 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2296. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND. O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 East Woodbridge St 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. T., 70 Isabella St 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 162 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
BAT CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa.. 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 84 Embarcadero. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA, B. C. Old Court Rooms. Bastion 

Square. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, Labor Temple. Cor. Homer 

and Dunsmuir, P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North SOth St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 66. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 51 Union Ave.. Box 2100. 

EUREKA. Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU. H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 91 Steuart St. 
Branches: 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1408% Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
x75. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St.. P. O. Box 674. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUIv SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 
One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



1.00 



Changes In advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors" Union of the Pacific, 
84 Embarcadero, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
ernl Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1913. 



OPIUM FOR CHINESE CREWS. 



To what extent the Chinese-loving ship- 
owner is wiUing to go to keep his yellow 
pets in contentment has again been illustrated 
by the publication of a news item relating to 
the seizure of opium in San Francisco harbor. 

When the British steamer "Harlow" ar- 
rived at San Francisco recently several hun- 
dred dollars' worth of opium were confiscated 
by local customs officials. There was nothing 
particularly unusual about this seizure until 
the Treasury department at Washington or- 
dered the Collector of the Port to immediately 
release and forward the opium to the port 
where the "Harlow" was then loading. In- 
quiry into this unheard-of procedure revealed 
some interesting details. It appears that the 
drug was designated on the ship's manifest 
as "opium for use of Chinese crew," and it 
was stated that the crew had been promised 
before signing that they would be allowed to 
consume opium while on the voyage. 

Now, it need not be pointed out here that 
opium is a poison far more dangerous and 
deadly than pure alcohol. The usual effect 
of opium smoking being a loss of appetite, 
a leaden pallor of the skin and a degree of 
leanness so excessive as to make its victims 
appear like living skeletons. With a con- 
tinued use of the drug all inclination for 
exertion becomes gradually lost, all duties 
are neglected and certain ruin follows. 

Yet, here we find a case in this enlight- 
ened age where resort to this vice seems to be 
tacitly encouraged by a shipowner. Why? 
For no other reason than to secure and keep 
a cheap crew. 

Surely it is high time to call a halt to this 
disgraceful condition. For the sake of de- 
cency and morality. Congress ought to pro- 
hibit the practice of permitting Chinese crews 
to be drugged with opium — at least it should 
be stopped in American ships and in foreign 
ships touching at American ports! 



THE IMPERATOR'S CARGO. 



Trade unionism that is not purely prac- 
tical and simply sensiljle is not trade union- 
ism at all. 



The Imperator, the giant German liner, 
has just completed a voyage across the At- 
lantic with a human cargo of 5019 persons 
aboard, passengers and crew, almost 2000 
more than any other ship in the regular pas- 
senger service ever carried. This is an army 
almost as large as that which Cornwallis sur- 
rendered at Yorktown, assuring the inde- 
])endence of what is now the United States. 
It is a great deal more than the population 
of many thriving towns. There is not a 
hotel in the world that could accommodate 
so many persons, housing them and feeding 
them. Yet this great multitude is more or 
less comfortably placed in that leviathan of 
the seas. 

Whether or not these five thousand people 
are better guarded against the dangers of the 
deep than were those who came over in the 
old packet ships, is another question. The 
story of the "unsinkable ship" went all right 
until the Titanic disaster opened the eyes of 
most people to the fact that luxury and 
safety do not necessarily travel hand in hand. 
But it is quite evident that the drowning of 
a few hundred passengers every once in a 
while does not retard the traveling public 
from patronizing the latest and greatest mar- 
vels of marine architecture. Of course, the 
dear public does not understand that there 
is even to-day more real safety in an old- 
fashioned windjammer than in the widely 
heralded Imperator or any vessel of her kind. 
In a windjammer there is usually an efficient 
crew and in most cases a sufficient number 
of boats to take care of all on board. Neither 
of these things are found in the average 
modern monsters of the deep, because both 
are rather expensive propositions. The 
Journal has dwelt upon these phases of 
safety with almost tiresome regularity. The 
average newspaper, however, is interested in 
the safety talk only when some awful catas- 
trophe of the sea takes place. And then the 
interest is only passing. It is with genuine 
pleasure, therefore, that we quote from an 
exceptionally well-written article in a recent 
issue of the Portland Labor Press upon the 
subject of safety of life at sea, as follows : 

The fact is that in competition for business 
the traveling public has been tempted from one 
line to another by an appeal — not to its sense 
of security — but to its taste for show and com- 
fort. 

The demand was created by enterprising man- 
agement under pressure for dividends. The 
public was and is the victim of its own weak- 
ness and of the company's willingness to play 
upon it. The public did not demand. It yielded. 

But even that is not all the truth against this 
vicious fallacy. The public has yielded to the 
temptation of luxury, but unquestionably upon 
the assumption that the luxury was evidence of 
the perfection of the whole product, evidence 
which even a landsman could understand that 
this magnificent ship was superior from keel to 
crow's nest. 

This fallacious conclusion, furthermore, has 
been encouraged by the companies. No one 
before the Titanic tragedy heard any steamship 
company hint that the luxury with which it was 
winning trafific was at the cost of safety. Such 
a hint would have been angrily denied. Yet 
after the disaster it is brought forward by the 
companies or their apologists as a defense. 

The compatlies are, or the public has a right 
to assume they are, expert in problems of the 
sea. The public assumed, and had a right to 
assume, that the companies were not imperiling 
life for the sake of providing them with luxury. 
A part of the public would accept the gaudy 
and excessive luxury of certain of the ships at 
the expense of safety. But this is only a small 
part of the public. By far the larger part sim- 
ply did not understand, and the companies have 
no right to require that the public should un- 
derstand what is an expert problem. 

No, the public is not to blame for lack of 
knowledge upon the subject. The carefully 
composed advertisements of the large steam- 
ship companies which regularly appear in 



our dailies and the pretty folders issued by 
the companies are about all the information 
the public ever receives upon safety of life 
at sea. And this is a sad but true commen- 
tary upon our press ! 



"WHAT SHALL THE ANSWER BE?" 



The Recall movement of State Senator 
Owens of Richmond, Cal., is progressing 
.splendidly. Recent events indicate that 
the champion double-crosser has begun to 
realize that the publication of a part of his 
disgraceful record in the Legislature will 
end his career as a statesman. Instead of 
replying to the charges that he freely broke 
his written promises to Labor and re- 
peatedly violated his party's platform 
pledges he attempts to fool the voters by 
continuing his famous legislative process 
of side-stepping and evading the issue. 

Fortunately, however, no one can fool 
the people all the time, not even a poli- 
tician as slippery as Senator Owens. 

The Star, of San Francisco, the leading 
Democratic weekly of the State, is among 
those who want to know why the misrep- 
resentative from Richmond does not an- 
swer the charges. To quote from the 
Star: 

What is the trouble with Senator Owens, that 
he can't discuss "the question before the house" 
in the matter of the recall petition being cir- 
culated against him? He knows well enough 
that the "Owens Law" is not in question, and 
that the liquor fight doesn't enter into the fight 
against him. Yet he is trying to hide behind 
the falsehood that the attempt to recall him is 
made because of the saloon legislation for 
which he is responsible, and that it comes in 
great part from "disgruntled divekeepers." 

The charges against Senator Owens are, as 
he well knows, that at twenty-nine roll-calls in 
the Senate on progressive and labor measures. 
Senator Owens was absent sixteen times and 
eleven times voted against them, which was the 
worst record made by any member of the Sen- 
ate. The last two days of the session he dodged 
or was absent on 113 roll-calls. 

Senator Owens fathered an amendment to the 
Boynton Workmen's Compensation bill that 
would have made industrial insurance an im- 
possibility; just what the insurance companies 
wanted. He voted against the Water Conserva- 
tion bill, to assist the power companies; he 
voted to limit the scope of the Women's Eight- 
Hour law and stayed away on final passage of 
the bill; he voted against mining inspection and 
against improved working conditions in mines, 
to please mining corporations. These are some 
of the reasons why Labor is seeking to recall 
Senator Owens. 

Is he guilty as charged? What answer does 
he make to that question? 

The effort of Senator Owens to lug the 
universally despised "divekeeper" into this 
Recall fight is a most contemptil)le trick, 
but it will help to give many an inkling of 
his true caliber. When it comes to a com- 
parison of the average "divekeeper" with 
Senator Owens some points will appear 
odious but in others the "divekeeper" is a 
shade ahead of the statesman from Rich- 
mond. Enough said. 

Let us try to induce Senator Owens to 
discuss his legislative career — his reasons 
for violating his pledges and his excuses 
for dodging the numerous important roll- 
calls. That kind of a discussion will be 
preferred by his constituents and will save 
us from the necessity of dwelling upon his 
.shortcomings in other respects. But if he 
attempts to make his defense by shifting 
the discussion to subjects other than those 
dealt with in the Recall petition he will 
probably soon find himself wallowing and 
sinking in a morass of his own making. 

This is not a threat — but a warning! 



In trade unionism, as in other human 
activities, success oftenest attends those 
who know how to wait — and work. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SALMON PACKERS' WAGES. 



The salmon packers who are returning to 
San Francisco from the canneries in Alaska, 
where they have been employed during the 
season, are enjoying the novel experience of 
receiving the full amount of their season's 
earnings. 

In the spring of the year the American 
Federation of Labor, upon recommendation 
of the San Francisco Labor Council, revoked 
the charter of the Salmon Packers' Union 
because that organization had fallen into bad 
hands and the charter was evidently not 
being used for any other purpose than to 
prevent the Labor Commissioner from pro- 
tecting the workers against robbery. Organ- 
ized labor of California then prevailed upon 
the Legislature to enact a law which em- 
powered the Labor Commissioner to enforce 
the payment of full wages in such cases. 
Under the provisions of this new law, State 
Labor Commissioner John P. McLaughlin 
and his deputies are now superintending the 
work of paying ofif the salmon packers and 
are not permitting any deductions for gam- 
bling debts, liquor, etc., as has been the cus- 
tom in past years. 

As a result, the salmon packers, who are 
mostly Mexicans, Porto Ricans and Filipinos, 
are receiving an average of $100 for their 
season's labor, as against an average of $38 
last year, and a much smaller amount two 
years ago, when the salmon packers were 
entirely at the mercy of sub-contractors and 
straw bosses. 

Thus is recorded another instance where 
organized labor secured a marked improve- 
ment in the condition of the unorganized 
worker. 



"LABOR" .AND THE UNIVERSITY. 



The University of California has just an- 
nounced that a Bureau of Public Discus- 
sion has been established as a part of the 
new University Extension Division. The 
Regents of our State-owned university are 
to be congratulated upon this step in the 
right direction. 

There ought to be many public discus- 
sions about important current events. As 
a topic for the first debate, one which will 
prove of particular interest to the working- 
people of California, we suggest the fol- 
lowing: 

"Why does our State-owned university 
— an institution supported by all the peo- 
ple — insist upon rubbing it into the work- 
ing people of the State by ignoring the 
one legal holiday in the year which is dedi- 
cated to Labor?" 

We feel certain that a public debate upon 
the foregoing subject will attract a large 
and enthusiastic audience. And as a re- 
sult of such discussion there ought to be 
an awakening of public interest in the 
general management of that institution. 
If those who direct the affairs of our State 
University do not consider Labor Day, and 
all that it stands for, of sufficient impor- 
tance to warrant its observation as a holi- 
day the people ought to know it. If the 
majority on the Board of Regents of our 
State University are entirely out of touch 
with the hopes, aims and aspirations of the 
men and women who toil the people ought 
to be made aware of it. Therefore, by all 
means, let us have an intelligent discus- 
sion of the whole matter. Let us learn 
"Who is Who" among the Regents and 



others entrusted with the management of 
this institution and then we will probably 
learn to understand why Labor is consid- 
ered unworthy of honor and Labor Day too 
common for proper observation ! 



NEW U. S. FLAGS. 



Now that the former Department of 
Commerce and Labor has been divided, 
and the labor end of it set up in business 
for itself, it has become necessary to change 
the numerous flags adopted for depart- 
mental officials. These will hereafter carry 
nothing indicative of labor, which depart- 
ment in due time will have its own flags, 
but will typify only the country's great 
and growing- trade. Singularly enough, the 
flag designs are all maritime, there being 
nothing in any of them to intimate that 
commerce is carried on with the aid of 
trains of cars as well as on ships. 

These new flags have recently been or- 
dered and should be in use during the 
coming autumn. 

The secretary of commerce will have 
a flag showing a full-rigged ship, in blue, 
over a lighthouse, in blue, in a white 
shield, on a blue field. At each corner of 
the flag will be a five-pointed white star. 

The assistant secretary of commerce will 
have a flag similar to that of the secre- 
tary, but with the colors reversed. 

The commissioner of fisheries will have 
a flag* of blue with a white fish in the 
center, its head pointing toward the hoist. 
The service flag of this bureau will be 
blue, with a white fish on a red diamond. 
The commissioner of lighthouses will 
have a flag of blue, with a white trian- 
gle l)earing a blue lighthouse. The service 
flag will be triangular in shape, white, 
with a red border, bearing a blue light- 
house. 

The flag of the superintendent of the 
coast and goedetic survey is a red trian- 
gle, apex forward, on a blue field. The 
service flag is a red triangle, base down, 
in a white circle on a blue field. 

The flag of the commissioner of naviga- 
tion is blue, with a full-rigged ship, in 
white, in the center. The service flag of 
the bureau is a full-rigged ship, white, in a 
red circle on a blue field. 



WOMEN'S TRADE UNION LEAGUE. 
(Continued from Page 1.) 



Lengiie brings to its trade union members may 
be such as the sick benefit provided by the 
Health Committee of the Chicago League. No 
one realizes more forcibly then the wage-earn- 
ing women the vital truth of the old saying 
that "health is wealth." On the principle that it 
is easier and more economical to conserve one's 
fortune than to attempt to build it up after it 
has been lost, the Women's Trade Union League 
of Chicago has as one of its activities a Heahh 
Committee, whose purpose is not only to care 
for the sick, but, in so far as possible, to pre- 
vent illness among its members. 

Last but not least is the educative work, 
nation-wide in scope, carried on by "Life and 
Labor," the magazine of the National Women's 
Trade Union League of America and the only 
woman's labor magazine in this country. It has 
been represented on the Pacific Coast for some 
time by Mrs. Ethel Carstens of San Francisco, 
and Mrs. Frances Noel of Los Angeles. 

But more extensive even than any of its pres- 
ent work are the plans for the future, and chief 
among these is the training of women organ- 
izers. To organize women on any large scale 
women organizers are needed. At present we 
have only too few of these, and it is this need 
that ihc Women's Trade Union League pro- 
poses to fill by regularly undertaking the train- 
ing of young trade workers as organizers in 
the various industries where women are em- 
ployed. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 22, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., E. Ellison presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

84 Embarcadero. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. IS, 1913. 
Shipping slack; few men around. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. IS, 1913. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

W'. S. BURNS, Agent. 
N. E. corner of Hastings and Main streets. 
P. O. Box 136S. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. IS, 1913. 
No trweeting; no quorum. Prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 15, 1913. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen .\gency, Sept. 15, 1913. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland .Agency, Sept. 15, 1913. 
.Shipping slack. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka .\gency, Sept. 15, 1913. 
No meeting: no quorum. Shipping medium. 
JOHN ANDERSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro .Agency, Sept. IS, 1913. 
.Shipping dull. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 8, 1913. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



Headc|uarters. San Francisco, Cal., .Sept. 18, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Ed. Andersen in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping quiet. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle .\gency, Sept. 11, 1913. 
Xo meeting. Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203-205. Phone 
Main 2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 10, 1913. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects fair; not 
many men ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



Portland .Agency, Sept. 10, 1913. 
No meeting. Shipping improving for cooks, 
but no waiters ashore. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
New Grand Central Hotel, Room 110, Third 
and Flanders Streets. 



DIED. 

Benjamin Franklin Lyons, No. 602, a native of 
Pennsylvania, age 38, died at San Francisco, 
Cal., September 17, 1913. 

Carl Johan Johnson, No. 1725, a native of Nor- 
way, age 40, died at San Francisco, Cal., Sep- 
tember 15. 1913. 

Lionel Norin, No. 1184, a native of Sweden, 
age 40. was drowned from the schooner "Lilly," 
July 13, 1913. 

Theodor P. Petersen, No. 563, a native of Nor- 
way age 40, tlied at Eureka, Cal., .September IS, 
1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE SINGLE TAX. 



One of the very best articles explaining 
and furthering the "Single Tax," appeared 
in the January issue of "Cotton," as a con- 
tribution from Joseph Fels, the untiring 
advocate of a method of taxation that will 
force idle land into use. Mr. Fels's article 
is reprinted herewith, in part, as follows: 

The United States is big enough to com- 
fortably hold a larger population than now 
exists in the whole world. Its soil is rich 
enough to support it. The state of Texas 
alone could support the whole present pop- 
ulation of the country if all of its land 
were put to its best use. If the United 
States were as closely settled as Belgium, 
it would hold 1,500 millions of people, a 
number equal to the estimated population 
of the world. So if all the land in the 
country were forced into use, there would 
be demand for all the labor in the world. 
To force enough into use to open oppor- 
tunities for all the labor we have now 
and all that is going to come, is all that 
is needed to establish an era of prosperity 
in which all producers can share. 

Some well meaning persons and others 
not so good intentioned, have objected to 
the single tax on the ground that it would 
burden the farmer. This objection is based 
on the misconception that we propose to 
put all taxes on land area. Such is not the 
case. We do not propose to tax land area, 
but land values. We don't want to tax 
land worth one dollar an acre the same as 
land worth one million dollars an acre. We 
want to ta.x the million dollar land a 
million times as much as the dollar land. 
It is necessary to repeat this because our 
position in this matter is being continually 
misrepresented. During the recent cam- 
paign in Mis.souri, Oregon and California, 
representatives of hostile interests told the 
farmers that we wanted to tax land accord- 
ing to area. These representatives un- 
doubtedly knew better, but the farmers did 
not and were fooled into voting against 
their interests. Farmers own the greatest 
amount of land area, but they own less 
than any other class of land values. Land, 
in the business center of large cities, is 
worth many times more than the most val- 
uable farm lands. To put all taxes on land 
values must cause the most taxes to be 
raised from those who own the most values 
and the least taxes from those who own 
the least values. The owners of city lots, 
of franchises and of mining lands, neces- 
sarily own the largest proportion of land 
values and are consequently the ones who 
under the single tax would pay the largest 
proportion of taxes. 

There are some who object to the single 
tax on the ground that they consider it 
wrong to single out one form of property 
for taxing purposes. This objection is 
based on the fallacy that taxation should 
not be apportioned according to benefits 
received, but according to ability to pay. 
Probably every one of these objectors can 
see how unjust and unbusinesslike it would 
be for a merchant to charge his customers 
for his wares in proportion to ability to 
pay. It is equally unjust and unbusiness- 
like for a government to charge that way 
for the services it performs, especially 
when we consider that a merchant can not 
compel those who object to his charges to 
deal with him, while the government can 



and does compel all to pay in accordance 
with whatever system it establishes. 

The single tax will make every one con- 
tribute to the support of government in 
proportion to the benefits he receives there- 
from. Where government is good, land 
values are higher than where it is bad — 
other things being equal. Those who own 
no land pay much higher rent where good 
government prevails than where the oppo- 
site is the case. Since they thus pay in 
rent for the benefits of good government 
is it not an injustice to compel them to 
pay a second time in taxes for what they 
have already paid ? The rent has been 
paid to a private landlord, it is true, not 
to the government, but it is the govern- 
ment's fault if it allows the landlord to 
keep it. 

No one will probably be disposed to 
question that what an individual produces 
justly belongs to him. No other individual 
has any right to deprive him of it against 
his w-ill. Neither would it be right for any 
collection of individuals to do so, even 
though the collection constituted the people 
of a state or nation. The taxation of the 
results of individual effort constitutes just 
such a violation of property rights. But 
it is different with the taxation of land 
values. Land is not a product of human 
labor; its value is not due to individual 
effort but to the presence, growth and 
enterprise of the whole community. In 
ta.xing land values, the conimunity conse- 
quently takes what it has itself created, 
and what justly belongs to it. 

It is no longer strictly correct to urge 
the objection that the single tax has never 
been tested. Of course, that would be no 
valid argument, even if it were still a fact. 

Intelligent people can reason how a 
principle will work, and if such reasoning 
shows the principle to be a good one, they 
will not hesitate to apply it merely because 
no one else has yet been intelligent or pro- 
gressive enough to do so. 

A partial application of the single tax 
principle has been made in New Zealand 
and Australia with such favorable results 
that there is no thought of returning to the 
old system. In the Western Canadian 
provinces it has in the past few years, 
made great headway. The number of cities 
in British Columbia and Alberta which 
have adopted it for local purposes has be- 
come considerable and is constantly in- 
creasing. Such important places as Van- 
couver and Edmonton are included in the 
list. In the rural districts of Alberta local 
single tax also prevails. The farmers of 
Western Canada cannot be fooled like 
their brothers on this side of the line, by 
the misrepresentations of privileged inter- 
ests. There is a heavy tide of emigra- 
tion from the United States into Western 
Canada which is likely to continue until 
we follow the example of these provinces 
and begin to untax industry. 

The single tax is equally applicable to 
your country, your state, your city or your 
town. 

Many ask, "How shall we take advan- 
tage of this system of taxation?" 

To develop your city : stop taxing indus- 
try and commerce. Tax land values only. 

To develop the ports : stop taxing 
wharves, warehouses, elevators. Tax front- 
age values, used or unused. 

To encourage industry: stop taxing prod- 



ucts of labor and industry. Tax special 
privilege, tax natural opportunities, used or 
unused ; tax land values which are pro- 
duced and maintained by the community. 

To abolish slums: stop taxing buildings, 
improvements. Tenement owners can then 
afford to erect better buildings. Tax build- 
ing sites, used or unused. Then the own- 
ers can not afford not to erect better build- 
ings. 

To stop taxing industry and commerce, 
we must exempt buildings, machinery, im- 
provements and personal property of all 
kinds. 

The present system of taxation falls with 
peculiar hardship on the health and homes 
of the poor, punishes industry and enter- 
prise by imposing a heavy financial burden 
upon shops, factories, buildings and im- 
provements of all kinds ; it encourages land 
owners to hold land out of use or to make 
poor use of it ; it contributes largely to- 
ward the overcrowding and congestion of 
the city; it leads to scarcity of employ- 
ment, and thus to poverty, disease and 
crime. 



THE MALDIVE ISLANDS. 



Little is ever heard concerning the Maldivc 
Archipelago, which consists of numerous 
atolls or groups of coral islets, about 400 
miles west of Ceylon, of which island Crown 
colony of Great Britain they are a depend- 
ency, having over them a Sultan who pays 
allegiance to and receives the protection of 
the Ceylon Government. The inhabitants 
number about 30,000 and profess the Mo- 
hammedan religion. Their chief industry is 
catching and salting fish for the Ceylon mar- 
ket, the exports of cured and salted fish to 
Ceylon amounting to about 200,000 hundred- 
weight (hundredweight = 112 pounds) per 
year, valued at about $500,000. Coconuts 
are grown on the islands, and a fair amount 
of copra is sent to Ceylon to be exported with 
Ceylon copra to other countries. 

At present, the means of communication 
between Ceylon and the Maldives is only 
by small sailing boats, but it has just been 
announced that the ambassador of the Sultan 
in Colombo has been instructed to advertise 
in English shipping papers for the purchase 
of a cargo steamer of 400 to 600 tons 
capacity. The vessel will be chiefly used for 
carrying cargo from the Maldives to Colom- 
bo, and it is intended to develop the trade 
in Maldivian fish and copra. Passenger ac- 
commodation will, however, be provided on 
the steamer, chiefly in order that the Sultan's 
heir and his suite may travel to and from 
the islands. The vessel must have four first- 
class cabins and six second-class cabins on 
the upper deck and also a certain amount 
of steerage accommodation. Electric lighting 
nuist also be installed, and there must be 
electric fans in the first-class cabins. The 
speed required is 12 knots. — Consular Re- 
ports. 



A new dry dock, the largest in Marseille, 
France, has just been completed. The 
dimensions of this dock, W'hich like the si.x 
others at that port was built and will be 
operated by the Compagnie des Docks et 
Entrepots, are as follows: Total available 
length, 669 feet; width, 82 feet; depth, 29.5 
feet on keel blocks. The cost of con- 
struction amounted to about $600,000. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PREFERENTIAL VOTING. 



There is a good deal of uncertainty in 
tlie minds of many people as to the differ- 
ence between preferential and proportional 
voting. A short explanation will serve to 
clear the matter up. The method of mark- 
ing the ballot paper is exactly the same in 
each case. The elector votes by putting 
"1" opposite the name of the best candi- 
date from his point of view, "2" opposite 
the second best, "3" opposite the third best 
and so on. 

What is commonly called the "preferen- 
tial" system is to vote, as explained, in 
single electorates. If the leading candidates 
is not elected by an absolute majority then 
the second choices on the ballot papers of 
the man at the bottom of the poll are 
taken and allotted to the other candidates, 
and in that way the number of candidates 
is reduced to two, one of whom has a ma- 
jority. 

With proportional voting the only dif- 
ference is that three or more candidates 
are elected for a district. Candidates, how- 
ever, do not have to poll a majority of 
votes, but a proportion, which is called a 
quota. The quota is obtained by dividing 
the total valid votes by one more than the 
number to be elected, and adding one to 
the result. Thus in a five member elec- 
torate where 32,470 votes were recorded 
the quota would be 5,411, plus 1, or 5,412. 
The candidate getting more than a quota 
of votes would have a surplus, which 
would be allotted among the other candi- 
dates according to the second preference, 
marked by the electors themselves on the 
ballot papers. Then the votes of the man 
at the bottom of the poll would be trans- 
ferred until the number of candidates was 
reduced to six, five being elected. Thus in 
an electorate, where roughly three-fifths of 
the voters were Liberal, and two-fifths 
Labor, they would be represented by three 
Liberal men and two Labor men respect- 
ively — each side being proportionately rep- 
resented. 

Some people are disposed to think that 
preferential voting in single electorates is 
good enough, and that it will solve the elec- 
toral problems, which are causing so much 
trouble at the present time. Let us see. 
At the last State elections in the Central 
and Western districts of the State, 19 ad- 
joining electorates elected 19 Labor mem- 
bers, three of them being unopposed. Each 
man had an absolute majority. Preferen- 
tial voting, even if it had been in opera- 
tion, would have made little or no differ- 
ence. In that great area of country 50,420 
Labor votes and 39,504 Liberal votes were 
polled, but the former got all the members. 
Allowing for the three uncontested seats, 
the true proportion would have been 11 
Labor, 8 Liberal. 

Take the North Coast and New England 
section of the State from Maitland to the 
Queensland border — 14 adjoining elector- 
ates. The results were. Liberal votes 
36,575, electing ten members; Labor votes 
26,623, electing nobody. Independent votes 
20,614, electing four members. Propor- 
tionally the results would have been Liberal 
7, Labor 4, Independent 3, or possibly Lib- 
eral 6, Labor 5, Independent 3. 

Or take from Miller's Point to Botany 
and Marrickville, 13 adjoining electorates 
monopolized by Labor members. The suc- 
cessful Labor candidates polled 50,521 



votes, the unsuccessful Liberal and Inde- 
pendent polled 27,602 and 3,708 votes re- 
spectively. Proportional results would have 
been 8 Labor and 5 Liberal, or possibly 9 
Labor and 4 Liberal. 

Again take the seven adjoining elector- 
ates from Parramatta and the Hawkesbury 
round to Manly. All elected Liberals. The 
voting was Liberal 36,315, Labor 19,244. 
Proportional results would have been Lib- 
eral 5 members. Labor 2 members, with 
Labor making a bold but unsuccessful bid 
to make it 4 and 3 respectively. "Better 
luck next time," when more "propaganda" 
work is done. 

Finally, five adjoining Newcastle elec- 
torates returned Labor members. The vo- 
ting was Labor 23,667, Liberal 7,422. True 
representation would have been 4 Labor 
men and 1 Liberal. 

If we had had preferential voting in sin- 
gle electorates at the last State election, 
there is no reason to suppose that there 
would have been any serious difference in 
the results, beyond in some small measure 
lessening the evils of party selection of 
candidates. There would have been the 
same monopoly of representation over great 
areas of the State — the majority over- 
represented, and the minority disfranchised. 
Preferential voting in single electorates is 
not a remedy for the evils of the present 
system. Single electorates must be abol- 
ished, and electorates returning three or 
more members adopted, preferably five 
members. Such a system would be fair to 
all candidates and all electors. The for- 
mer would be free to make their appeal 
direct to the electors, and the latter would 
be equally free to accept or decline the 
proffered services. — Sydney (Australia) 
Standard. 



THE CAPE COD CANAL. 



An additional year in which to complete the 
Cape Cod Canal and bringing the time to 
June 3, 1915, has been allowed by the Massa- 
chusetts authorities. The canal is five-eighths 
completed, according to President August 
Belmont of New York, who was before the 
commission on a petition for the extension 
of time and for additional stock and bonds. 
Mr. Belmont stated that 10,000,000 cubic 
yards of material had been dredged and that 
6,000,000 remained to be taken out. The 
joint commission approved the issue of $240,- 
000 in bonds and 2,390 shares of stock at 
par. Work was begun on June 21, 1909. It 
is a private enterprise, with August Belmont 
as the financial backer. By a cut eight miles 
long, with a distance of eight and one-half 
miles from Barnstable Bay to the 30-foot 
depth of water in Buzzard's Bay, it is to 
connect Boston with Long Island Sound, 
thus obviating the long water journey around 
Cape Cod. The canal is to have a continuous 
depth of 25 feet, with a minimum width on 
the bottom of 200 feet and on the surface 
of 350 feet. It has no locks. The importance 
of this artificial waterway may be estimated 
from the statement that 50,000 vessels, with a 
tonnage of 25,000,000, annually take the long 
and dangerous voyage around Cape Cod, 
which has been aptly called one of the 
"graveyards of commerce." Now this com- 
merce 'will not be subjected to the dangers of 
the runabout course, to say nothing of the 
time and money thereby saved. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUICEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y -..70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295 

BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOI^EDO, 64 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH CT?ICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO. ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND. O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo. N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie. Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron. Mich 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette. Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw. Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault St. Marie, 
Sheboygan, Wis 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



Mich. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SEAMEN'S HEIRS WANTED. 



By request of the clerk of the United 
States District Court at Tacotna, Wash., 
a list of 18 deceased seamen is published 
herewith. 

The wages of these 18 deceased men 
which have been held by the clerk of the 
United States Court for the past six years, 
will be paid into the surplus fund of the 
Snug Harbor Association at the close of the 
year, unless their heirs are located before 
that time. The law provides that the funds 
due deceased sailors shall be held by the 
clerk for six years from the time that they 
are paid in, and that if no relatives have 
been discovered in that time the money 
shall go to the Snug Harbor fund. Since 
the office has been established an enormous 
amount of money has been turned over in 
this manner as it is impossible to trace the 
relatives of dead seamen. It is estimated 
that at least $5,000,000 has been turned over 
to the fund from his source. 

Every effort has been made by the clerk's 
office to trace the nearest relatives of the 
dead sailors. Registered letters have l^een 
sent to every possible place that relatives 
might be discovered. The office at Tacoma 
takes probably more trouble than possibly 
any other in the United States. No pro- 
vision is made by law for locating the rela- 
tives of deceased seamen and the cost of all 
foreign postage must come out of the 
clerk's pocket. There are over a hundred 
estates that have never been claimed, but 
some eflfort has been made to locate the 
heirs to every one of these and the expense 
entailed has been considerable. The 
amounts due range from $1.35 up to $200. 
The efforts to discover the heirs of de- 
ceased seamen sometimes disclose a case 
of abject poverty that the money relieves 
in the nick of time. John Johns left a con- 
siderable sum after his suicide at sea. Af- 
ter much eflfort an aunt was discovered in 
Ireland. She was 73 years old and was 
starving at the time she was located. It 
took three months' correspondence to dis- 
cover her whereabouts and the money en- 
abled her to come to America, where she 
found friends. 

When the schooner "Hayden Brown" 
was wrecked on the Alaska coast she car- 
ried a crew of six men, all of whom were 
drowned. None of them had less than $85 
coming to him and in only one case was it 
possible to discover the relatives. The 
money, which amounts to several hundred 
dollars," is still held in the clerk's ofifice and 
will be turned into the Snug Harbor fund 
at the end of the year. Many eflforts have 
been made to locate the heirs of the de- 
ceased, but without success. 

Every one of the estates held l>y the 
clerk's ofifice has a story attached to it. 
Some are tragic, other pathetic, and still 
others grimly humorous. The running 
down of the deceased's relatives often un- 
covers strange criminal records. 

The money due seamen that desert a 
ship is also paid into the clerk's office. In 
this case it goes directly into the fund, as 
the sailor can not claim it unless he can 
prove that he did not intend to desert and 
was left behind by accident. Thousands of 
dollars have passed through the office from 
this source in the past few years. 

The names of the eighteen deceased sail- 



ors whose money will go into Snug Harbor 
fund at the close of the year follows: 

Charley .Anderson, Norwegian, schooner "Helen 
E.," died November 5, 1906. 

O. Brunstrim, Fin, schooner "William Bow- 
den/' died June 9, 1907. 

John Doyle, Irish, ship "Yucatan," died April 
.S, 1907. 

\V. Herren, steamer "Alta," died November 
28, 1907. 

Dan Johnson, Swede, schooner "Charles R. 
Wilson," died October 3, 1907. 

M. Johansen, Swede, schooner "Louis," died 
June 17, 1907. 

Otto Kraum, steamer "Winslow," died May 16, 
1906. 

C. Lindholm, Fin, schooner "J. H. Bruce," 
died October 17, 1906. 

M. McXamara, English, schooner "Joseph B. 
Thcruas," died June 30. 1907. 

E. Pederson, Norwegian, schooner "Charles F. 
Crocker," died November 24, 1906. 

J. Phillips, .\merican, steamer "Tampico," 
died September 13, 1907. 

Karl Rudolphsen, Swede, ship "Quinault," died 
August 25. 1907. 

E. A. Smith, American, schooner "Hayden 
Brown," died March 7, 1906. 

Loo Sing, Chinese, ship "Lyra," died July 14, 
1907. 

Ole A. Watle, Norwegian, steamer "Erie," died 
February 25, 1907. 

Jeng Wing. Chinese, steamer "Tremont," died 
October 4, 1906. 

Wong Fung, Chinese, steamer "Minnesota," 
died November 4. 1906. 

No Wing. Chinese, ship "Pleiades," died Sep- 
tember 15, 1906. 



WRECKS OF 1912. 



AUSTRALIA'S POPULATION. 



In 1881 there were nearly 200,000 more 
males than females in Australia. Returns 
30 years later show that the excess of 
males has diminished to 187,000, on an ag- 
gregate population nearly twice as great. 

During the first nine months of its oper- 
ation the land tax apparently caused, or at 
least was contemporaneous with, the split- 
ting up of some $45,000,000 worth of land 
within the Commonwealth. In that period 
sales of assessable lands were reported to 
the amount of $88,513,328, whereas pur- 
chases were reported to the amount of 
$45,095,450 only. 

The loan indebtedness of the Common- 
wealth according to latest returns stands 
at $1,330,039,000, an increase of $339,613,- 
500 since federation. This indebtedness 
amounts to $280 per head of population. 
The interest on the Australian public debt 
in 1912 totaled $47,435,150, an increa.se of 
$11,155,200 since federation. 



Little more than half a century ago the 
town of New Bedford, Mass., was at the 
height of its prosperity as the chief seat 
of American whale fishery. That the pres- 
ent generation and future generations may 
be reminded of New Bedford's one-time 
importance in this industry — an industry 
which it has yet by no means wholly aban- 
doned — W. W. Crapo is to give to the 
town a commemorative piece of sculpture, 
the work of Bela L. Pratt of Boston. The 
gift will be set up in front of the New 
Bedford library next spring and will bear 
the following inscription : "In honor of the 
whalemen whose skill, hardihood and dar- 
ing brought fame to New Bedford and 
made its name known in every seaport on 
the globe." 



The statistical summary of vessels totally 
lost, broken up, condemned, etc., just pub- 
lished by Lloyd's Register, shows that, dur- 
ing 1912, the gross reduction in the effect- 
ive mercantile marine of the world 
amounted to 720 vessels of 748,965 tons, ex- 
cluding all vessels of less than 100 tons. 
Of this total, 379 vessels of 572,745 tons 
were steamers, and 341 of 176,220 tons were 
sailing vessels. 

These figures are lower than those for 
1911 by 135,878 tons (47,007 tons steam, 
and 88,871 tons sail). 

One of the most common terminations of 
a vessel's career is by breaking up, dis- 
mantling, etc. (not in consequence of cas- 
ualty). The amount of tonnage so dealt 
with in 1912 was 157,641 tons, this being 
97,876 tons less than that for 1911. Nearly 
23 per cent, of the steamers and 24 per 
cent, of the sailing vessels removed from 
the merchant fleets of the world in the 
course of 1912 are accounted for in this 
manner. Of the total tonnage of such cases 
over 38 per cent, is represented by United 
Kingdom vessels. 

The number and tonnage of vessels lost, 
etc., during the previous seven years are 
as follows: 

— Steamers — — Sailing Vessel.s — 
Year No. Tons (Gross), No. Tons (Net). 

1905 382 527,978 501 264,376 

1906 378 509,707 567 307,105 

1907 356 565,119 512 286,105 



In northern Minnesota there is a great 
area of land so flat that its waters some- 
times flow into Hudson Bay and sometimes 
into the Gulf of Mexico. There are times 
when certain lakes discharge at both ends, 
the northern outlet taking the flow through 
Red River or Rainy River into Lake Win- 
nipeg and thence into Hudson Bay, while 
the southern outlet leads to the Mississippi. 



WIRELESS FOR LIGHTHOUSES. 



If the wireless lighthouse stations in- 
stalled at Brest, which automatically send 
out warning messages to ships every few 
seconds without the help of man, prove a 
success, as they are reported to be, it will 
mean, says a well-known scientific expert 
in London, "that the old system of lights, 
bells, horns and other danger warnings at 
sea will be rendered unnecessary." 

"By noting the intensity of the signals 
received an approximate idea of the dis- 
tance from the sending station can be 
formed by a skilled wireless operator," 
states the Electrical Review. 

"Were every vessel equipped with wire- 
less transmitting apparatus a more conveni- 
ent arrangement would be to provide di- 
rective aerials at land stations, thus en- 
abling the stations to determine the bear- 
ing of any ship issuing inquiries, and then 
to communicate the bearing to the vessel." 

Explaining how the adoption of the wire- 
less lighthouses would insure the safety of 
shipping all over the world, the expert 
referred to said: "The lighthouse in each 
case would act as a mast. By a simple 
clockwork arrangement, which only needs 
attention once a week or so, distinctive 
messages are sent out by each station every 
few seconds. One set of signals is sent 
out every ten seconds and another set every 
thirty seconds, so that ships may positively 
identify the lighthouse that is 'talking.' 

"These lighthouse wireless stations need 
only have a small wireless range — the range 
of one lighthouse — so that confusion of 
messages may be avoided. If the scheme 
is universally adopted it means that the ter- 
rors of fog at sea probably will be van- 
quished forever." 



Some men have the ability to blow a 
tin horn in a way to make it sound as if it 
were made out of gold. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



\l 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



It will also make possible the organization 
of the entire exterior marble industry (it 
is unorganized to-day) under the banner 
of the Journeymen Stone Cutters' Associa- 
tion of America, affiliated with the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor. 



One Killed; Others Wounded. 

President Moyer, of the Western Federa- 
tion of Miners, wires: "While labor was 
celebrating, hirelings in the employ of cop- 
per magnates of Michigan were murdering 
innocent children. The deputies fired into 
a crowd of helpless women and children, 
killing a girl of fourteen years. The cop- 
per strike situation took a serious aspect 
to-day as the result of the fatal shooting. 
Miners' leaders say the deputies fired with- 
out provocation into the crowd of men and 
women, killing the girl and several others." 

The military forces have taken charge 
of the patrol work about the mines at 
Wolverine and the Kearsarge as a result of 
the shooting. General Abbey has ordered 
an investigation. Senator J. S. Reed of 
Missouri, will be asked by the Western 
Federation of Miners to present a resolu- 
tion to the United States Senate calling 
for an investigation into the strike of the 
copper mines, which threatens to paralyze 
Michigan's great copper industry for 
months to come. With $100,000 in cash 
contributed by the Illinois Mine Workers, 
$2.S,000 by the United Brewery Workers 
and $36,000 drawn from the treasury of the 
Federation, there is enough money in the 
hands of the strike leaders to ward off 
destitution among the workers and to pay 
strike benefits. President Moyer believes 
the State militia is needed in the copper 
country to protect the strikers from the 
men imported by the mine owners to act 
as special deputies. 



Less Hours — More Wages. 

President George Hendrick, of the 
Brotherhood of Painters, Decorators and 
Paperhangers, in referring to the growth 
of the membership during the past year, 
said : "At our last convention we had a 
membership of 65,208, while at the close of 
July this year we had 81,032, an increase of 
15,829. The above does not include mem- 
bers carrying clearance cards which have 
not been deposited, nor all of the honorary 
members or apprentices. In the Dominion 
of Canada we have made a remarkable 
gain ; at the last convention we had only 
1,355 Canadian members, while at present 
we have 3,552, a gain of 2,197. The report 
of General Secretary-Treasurer J. C. Skemp 
showed that in the period from November 
1, 1909, to July 31, 1913, the expenditures 
totaled $1,072,725.72, and that there was 
now a balance on hand of $154,844.22. 
During the period 464 local unions were 
chartered and 296 lapsed or were consoli- 
dated." Referring to wages and hours, 
the secretary has this to say: "Of the 
1,005 local unions affiliated with the Broth- 
erhood, 644, with a membership of 58,717, 
have reported their wages in 1909 and at 
present. The average wage in 1909 was 
$2.97. The average wage to-day is $3.45. 
The average gain for each of the 45,853 
members of the 520 locals that report ad- 
vances made during the period was 60 cents 
per day, or $150 each year of 250 working 
days, a total daily gain in all members af- 



fected of $27,511.80; a total gain for a year 
of 250 working days of $6,877,950. Of the 
locals reporting, 520 enjoy the eight-hour 
day; 106 work nine hours a day, and in 
fourteen instances the ten-hour day still 
prevails. One hundred and twenty-seven 
locals with a membership of 13,000 have 
shortened their work day; ninety-nine of 
these have gained the eight-hour day since 
our last general assembly. The Saturday 
half-holiday is in vogue in 251 of the locals 
heard from, in 146 of which it has been es- 
tablished in the last four years. These 
shortenings of the working day and of the 
working week have furnished employment 
for an additional 2,840 men. These reduc- 
tions in hours are equivalent to increases 
in wages, but in few instances have the 
locals been required to make sacrifices in 
wages to obtain them. Gratifying as these 
reports are, the actual gains are much 
greater. Many of the locals not reporting 
have gained increases in wages or reduc- 
tions in hours during the four-year peri- 
od." President Hedrick and Secretary 
Skemp were each re-elected by acclamation. 



Polish Workers in Revolt. 

After years of misery and oppression, 
Poland is now in the throes of a series of 
-strikes. Warsaw gave the example, and 
other towns soon followed suit, notably 
Lodz, where 65,000 workers are out. All 
over Poland the workers are demanding 
an increase of wages, varying from 30 to 
50 per cent. The bad harvests of 1911- 
12 have caused infinite sufifering in Lodz, 
where the workers have been driven to 
desperation. Even the average manufac- 
turer and bourgeois newspaper acknowl- 
edges that the worker is condemned to 
suffer hunger because of his wretched pay. 
The workers of Lodz have declared war on 
the powers controlling the cotton and 
woolen industries. These capitalists tri- 
umphed over the working classes in 1907, 
and successfully appealed to the govern- 
ment to suppress all trade unions. The 
capitalists have boldly stated that they 
intend "giving the workmen a lesson." 
The anti-Semitic press is actively denounc- 
ing the strikers, saying that the movement 
has been brought about by Socialist and 
Jewish agitators. The government has for- 
bidden any workers' committee to collect 
funds or food. The only organization al- 
lowed to do so is, ironically enough, com- 
posed of the very men the strikers are 
fighting. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATfORM. 



STEAMSHIP COMPANIES MERGE. 

Eleven steamship companies operating on 
the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River 
were merged June 10 into the Richelieu and 
Ontario Navigation Company, with $16,000 
capital, three-fourth of which is preferred 
stock. The companies that have been ac- 
quired • are the Richelieu and Ontario Navi- 
gation Company, Inland Lines, Ltd. ; North- 
ern Navigation Company, Ltd. ; Niagara 
Navigation Company, Ltd. ; St. Lawrence 
River Steamboat Company, Ltd. ; Richelieu 
and Ontario Navigation Company (United 
States); Quebec Steamsip Company, Ltd.; 
Canada Interlake Line, Ltd. ; Ontario and 
Quebec Navigation Company, Ltd. ; Mer- 
chants and Montreal Line, S. S. Haddington 
and Thousand Island Steamboat Company, 
Ltd. It was hinted at the close of the meet- 
ing that the new name of the reorganized 
merger will likely be the Canada Lakes. 
River and Ocean Company. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 



(Continued from Page 6.) 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATrON 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 
LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash,, P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headiiuarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

2* ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. •. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEiATTLE, WASH. 



^AM^W^MMMMMtfMWWN^WMM^^tfMM^^hM^ 



J- j i j" _nj~Lr i -r i j~ i .r i rn~iri~i~i' i * i ~ i " [ ■-Y 'lr'T— * t""""— '*~'^^'^^''''^^'^^* ^ ^^ ^ * ^ 



Residence Phone Ballard 1639 



The Argentine Naval Commission 
in London reports that an arrange- 
ment is being made for accepting the 
four destroyers constructed for the 
Argentine Government hy French 
shiphuilders. 

The Court of Inciuiry appointed to 
incjuire into the recent stranding 
of the Canadian Pacific Railway 
Company's steamer "Lake Manitoba" 
in the St. Lawrence, found that the 
pilot was to blame, and has sus- 
pended his license. 

The United States Coast and 
Geodetic Survey Service is making 
preliminary arrangements to run lines 
of deep-sea soundings between the 
.\merican Coast and the island of 
Bermuda this fall. 

The submarine boat "K-1" was 
launched at Quincy, Mass., Septem- 
ber 4. She is 147.5 feet long by l.v5 
feet beam. The displacement is 390 
tons and 520 tons submerged; speed, 
14.5 knots on surface; 4 torpedo 
tubes. 

The Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion has assigned for hearing Sep- 
tember IS, Case No. 4844, dealing 
with the general adoption by car- 
riers of a uniform bill of lading. The 
hearing will be held before Commis- 
sioner Clements in Washington, D. 

C. 

The Hamburg-American line is 
again asking bids from American 
shipbuilders for three large coast- 
wise passenger and cargo steamships 
of high-power, 500 feet long, with a 
minimum speed of 18 knots and ac- 
commodation for 500 cabin and 1,700 
steerage passengers. 

Richard H. Taylor, of Washington; 
James L. Hughes, of Philadelphia, 
and P. L. Prentis, of Chicago, all 
attached to the Immigration Service, 
have been appointed by Secretary 
Wilson, of the Department of Labor, 
to investigate conditions at the im- 
migrant station at Ellis Island, New 
York. 

The Turkish Government has ob- 
tained permission to send each year 
to the Italian naval schools a cer- 
tain number of young students who 
will form the future superior officers 
of the Turkish fleet. Twenty of 
these students will enter the naval 
school at Leghorn in November. 

The first cargo of Argentine chilled 
beef for the United States was 
shipped from Buenos Ayres August 
22 by the Lamport & Ilolt liner 
"Vandyck." The cargo, consisting 
of one thousand quarters, is con- 
sidered an experiment. More will 
be sent if this shipment is favorably 
received. 

Harrod C. Newland, secretary of 
tlie Caribbean Construction Company, 
owners of the steamship "Fulton," 
has applied for American registry 
of the vessel, which was sold to the 
National Railway Company of Hayti, 
last year, and is now under the 
Haytien flag. She has since been re- 
purchased by her original owners. 

Congress probably will be asked to 
appropriate funds to bring back the 
dust of the fifty-three sailors of the 
United States ship Essex, who lost 
their lives in a naval battle in the 
Chilean harbor of Valparaiso in 1814, 
when their ship was engaged by two 
British war ships. They rest just 
outside Valparaiso, beneath a slab on 
which is chiseled the inscription: 
"In memory of the officers and sea- 
men slain aboard the LTnited States 
frigate Essex in this harbor in an 
engagement with H. B. M's frigate 
Phoebe and brig Cherub, February 
23, 1814." 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
202-4 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKB 



Little 
other 



The "Popular Favorite," the 
Beauty," the "Prlncesi" and 
high grade union-made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - • Eureka, Cat 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Vernon W. Buck Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & KNUTSON 
Lawyers and Prectori In Admiralty 
Free Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle. Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodleB tor shipping a spe- 
cialty. AH orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 2S-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE. Proprietor. 

DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERM AM 8. SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Seattle Navigation School 

Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requirements. 
Candidate* thoroughly 
prepared for License 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 

By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and niot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compajis Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDINQ 
911 Western Ave., SBATTLB, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY <t. YOUNQ 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsaparlUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 




K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-11» MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and O 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Seattle, Waah., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoffice, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 
.\biaham.sen. Jo- Jolinson, A. 

linnnes Jensen, Hans -2114 

Aiuicrson, H. Jensen, G. S. 

Andersen, A. -1352 Johan.son. Knut 
Alonzo, J. Johannesen. Olaf 

Ahsalomsen, O. M. Johanson, K. .1. 
-Mexis, H. Jolianson, Theodor 

Agcrup, K. B. Johnson, G. 

.\ndersen, O. -1719 Johnson, Olaf 
Anderson, A. -1821 Kalning. J. 
Anderson, H. Torn! Krutz, Ivan 
Anderson, Ragnvald Klehnikoff, I. W. 
Anderson, David Korber, Th. 

.\nderson, I. Kreutz. Karl 

Anderson. Hjalmar Karsima, N. 



Behr. Henry 
Burholtz, F. 
Borgen. K. S. 
Brox, H. 
Brower, G. 
Broberg, Chas. 
Muekow. C. W. 



Karrell, J. 
Kolberg, Joe 
Larsen, L. A. 
Laisen, Charles 
Little, Sid 
Ljunggren, Edmund 
Lof, Oscar 



-Vbianiis, George 
.Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, Gust, 

-1808 
Anderson, Nils 
Anderson, Die 
Andersen, Mike 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Krik B. 
.Alexander, John 
Allnechlsen, Page 
Androiio, A. 



T^arsen, Engvald 
Larsen, Martin, 

-1710 
Larsen, Soren 
Ijerch, Paul 
Lewik, Karl 
Lemarchand, Louis 
Lendeman, Ruhtii 
Lund.sudr. Oskar 
Lundmark, Heege 
Lund(iuist, Ernest 
Macrae, Allexander 



Bergman, Karl W. Marchand. Louis 

Brodig, Wm. G. Matlson, Maurits 

Bults, Ernest Miller, Chas. 

Buckmer, W. McManus, John 

Carlsen, Charlie McMahon, Jack 

Chase, W. P. Meinke, Rudolf 

Chrlstensen, Albert Meyer. W. 

Colman, E. Nelson, Anton 

Conway, M. E. Nelsen, C. J. 

Collins, Frank Nielsen, Kristian 

Cunnicham, W. P. Nielsen, Edward 
Nilsson, Osvold 



Narborg, John 
Narnian, Ludwig 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Olsen, Severin 
Olsen, Ausgar 
O'Brien, Jack 



Dalil, Henry 

Day, Aca 

Dennis, Cliarlie 

Dorff, William 

Edstrom. John 

Ehenbaugh, W. J. 

Ekham, Frans 

Fredrickson, H. G. Person. Charles 

GJortz, P. I'erouse, Andre 

Gordia, I'iet Petrich. Theodore 

GuHiksen, .\niandus Petersen, Aage 

Hall, G. A. Peterson, Hans 

Hansen. Bernard Peterson, Heinle 

Helin. Waldemar Petterson, Einar 

Henriks. Waldemar Pedersen, Peter 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 445 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. 8t., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



«^kAA^k^/\AAA^SA>^\AAi/VS>AA^^^^^^^^'^V%^^^^^^ 



HOTEL YOUNG 

European Plan 

313-315-317 SECOND ST., EUREKA 

Rooms, 25c per Night up 

Per Week, $1.50 up 

UNION LUNCH COUNTER 



Cliristensen, Anton Larson, Ing^^ald 



Crosley, J. 
Carlson. Thure 
Davidson. Jacob 
Davis. Joseph 
Dylwik. E. 
Dall, Carl 
Ellinsen, H. O 
Enig, Herman 
Ehlert. August 
Edvardsen, Anton 
Kkwall, G. .V. 
Ellison, Sam 
Eliason, C. 
lOrikson, Axel 
Eskilsen, Lars 
Evanger. Nils 
Fonshmd. Victor 



Larsen. Axel -1746 
Larson, John 
Lovera, P. 
Lackey, C. 
Larsen, L. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, A. 
I^arsen, Fred 
Lundgren, K. J. 
Marks, T. 
Martins, Paul 
Mcl'hrrson, R. 
McCarthy, J. 
Mortensen, J. C. 
Murphy, D. 
Mynchmeyer, H. 
Maver, J. S. 



Henke, Ernest 
Hellnian, Albin 
Helenius, Oskar 
Holini, E. 
Huntington, E. R. 
Hoch, Gore 
Hultman, A. 



Pratt. M. L. 
Rantio, Jacob 
Raetz. August 
Rasmussen. Tlior 
Roed. Hallilan 
Sandstrom, Hugo 
Sanders, Chas. 



Frfdriksen, Harold M.acdonald, N. 



Fjellman, Geo. 
Freeman, J. 
Franzell, A. 
FJel.stad, K. M. 
Forsen. Alex 
Fortune. John 
Framness. Ivar 
Gaugserud, O. K. 
G.hler, F. 
Grant. J. J. 
Grantley, C. W. 
Gunderson, L. S. 
Hansen, A. M. 
Hansen, Har.s 
TTelpap, A. 
Han.sen, Hans P. 
Hansen. N. S. 
Hoglund. Ephralm 
Hnlst. L. 
Hubner, Herman 
.Taeper, F. .T. 
Jacobsen. Torglls 
Jacobsen, Johan 



Martinsen, Harold 
Makl, Ivar 
Mathisen, Nils 
McNeary, J. 
McDougall, J. 
Miller. J. C. 
Mikkelsen, K 
Moore, J. M. 
Mulr, J. 
Munroe, W. 
Martinsen, Ragn 

vald 
Newland E. 
Nielsen, F. M. 
Nilsen, T. H. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nelson, H. J. 
Nicholsen. F. E. 
Nilson. Andrew 
Neilsen. Erlvard 
Nielsen, Alfons 
Nilsen, Albert 
Nylund, Arthur 



1«20 



Johansen, Johan F. Simens, O. L. 



Johnsen, Chris 
Jolinson, A.xcl 
Johnson, Jack 
Jolinson, Die C. 
Johnson, W. 
.lohnson, H. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Karlson, K. E. 
Kenny, James 
Kealy, James 
Kikur, AUesander 
Koop, Nick 
Kronstrand, H. T. 
Krlstensen, W. 
Koalvik, Oscar 
Laine, Frank 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, George 
Lurberg 



Schulz, Robert 
Saule, J. L. 
Swanson, John 
Swenson, Carl Oscar 
Sauklia, August 
Hwcnson, John B. 
Thomas, A. 
Tamford, B. A. 
Trost, Peter 
Wall, W. H. 
Warren. Chas. B. 
Wadren, G. F'. 
Westlund, Gust 
Wehi, J. 

Wiejurecht. Ernest 
Weshart, Jno. 
Welsen, J. 
Bunk, Bruno 



^^WW%A^%'*A^/>^A^^^^^N^^V>/N*>^*^N^W\*WV^^^ 



O'Brien. J. S. 
Olsen, C. 
Olsen, Trygve 
Olsson, Brov 
Olsen, O. -1062 
Olsen, Ed 
Olsen, C. E. 
Olsen, B. -597 
Oniholt, T, 
Orell, A. 
Pedersen. O. A. 
Poppe. Geo. 
Petterson, Karl 
Pedersen, Hedley 
Pedersen, P. C. 
Pedersen, Peder 



Persson, Jolian 
Petterson, Harry 
Petersen, V. -1447 
Petterson, Richard 
Petterson, S. 
Quigley. R. E. 
Rees, W. 

Skubber. II. (Reg- 
istered) 
Stahlbaum. E. 
Stone. C. L. 
Sandburg. C. 
Schuldt, Theoder 
Seley, G. 
Sterr, W. T. 
Saar, J. 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PALMER, Proprietor 

A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand— Sailors' Hall— 553-R 

EUREKA 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union made. 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 
Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Harry 
.\nderson, John 
Breien, Hans 
Clausen, Fred 
Debus, Fred 
Elilert, August 
Gudmundsen, 
mund 



Jacobsen. W. 
Jensen, George 
Nilson. Anton 
Miller. Fred 
Publicatus, August 
Plas, Henry 
Gud- Robertson, A. 

Svvertsen, Paul 



Hansen, Harald Thorsen, Fredrik 

Ismas, Richard 



Samuelson, H. 
Schu'.tz. P. (Regis- 
tered) 
Schultz, Axel 
Scott, Alfred 
Starness, C. O. 
Storek 

Slewart, J. G. 
Strauss, W. 
St. Johns. C. R. 
Suarth. A. 
Steel. J. R. 
Sharness, C. O. 
Sperlan, B. 



Thomson. P. 
Tyghe, T. 
Thienpolnt. F. 
Thogren, David 
Thorsen, Tom 
Veasted, T. P. 
Van Loo, A. 
Veiney. A. 
Walschwell. A. 
■Warner, .lake 
Waters, L. A. 
Wehde, F. 
Wessman, John 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



PORTLAND, OR. 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Plione Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN 



J. G. WOOD 



Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Tacoma, Wa»h., Letter List. 



Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Berglind, Erik 
Conley, J. H. 
Dehler, Alfred 
Christensen, Albert 
Dehler, Alfred 
Ellison, Harry H. 
Eidsvoog, Fetter 
Fors, Alfred 
Grovefl Albert 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hangen, Arthur 
Hetman, Walter 
Iversen, Ivar 



Jorgensen, Peter A. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Kesler, Karl 
Kathy, A. 
Melgail, M. 
Moren, G. H. 
Nilsson, Edvin 
Olsen, Olat 
Olsen. Martin E. 
Persson, John 
Plesner, Levi J. 
Person, Friti: , 
Patterson, J. M. 
Simonsen, Sigvald 
Seblom, John 
Thorsen, Axel L. 



TACOMA, WASH. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman &. Katz, Just 
around the corner from the Union Offlce. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Home News. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesal* and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 

Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 



Phone 691 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Stand: 
At Sailors' Union Office 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. IVI. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



Anderson, -1283 
Aalto, Waino 
Andersen, F. C. 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Arntzen, Werner 
Andersen, -1352 
Armstrong, Harry 
Batchall, Alex. 
Brust, Frank 
Behn, Alfred 
Brown, C. 
Christensen, Albert 
Carson, Edward 
Campbell, M. 
Donohue, J. O. 
Eriksen, -837 
Edwards, J. T. 
Edwardsen. Anton 
Eissing, B. 
Finth, Richard 
Flatten, James 
Feitz, F. 
Graf, Otto 
Glase, Gustav 
Hvid, Hans 
Hansson, Alf. 
Hansen, Jens 
Hansen, Torlelf 
Jensen, Fredrlk 
Jansson, J. 
Jacobsen, Peder 
Johansen, Tobias 
.'ensen, Harry 
Klepzig, Otto 
Kallio, Fran 
Lengtssen, Gottfried 
Lundmark, Helge 
Ljungberg, Htrman 
Larsen, Peter 
Linsler, A. B. 
Llndroos, A. W. 
Laining, Herman 



Laine. Herman 
Larsen, Lars 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Lauritzen, George 
London, A. 
Mattson, K. A. 
Mortensen, C. 
MacManus, Hugh 
Muller, I. B. 
Miller, Winford 
Mertz, G. 
Muller, W^alter 
MacFadden, Wm. 
Mekerman. Ernest 
Nikolin, B. Miko 
Nilson, Jack 
Oksanen, Juko 
Pankhurst, Tlio.s. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pedersen, -1054 
Pedersen, Oscar 
Petersen, Christian 
Petersen, Aago 
Razehelm, Franz 
Runge, V. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Sanders, Robert 
Siren, Frans 
Samuelsen, W. 
Speckman, Max 
Schramm, A. 
Siegund, .Justus 
Thorn, -70 
Quarnstrom, Aleck 
Walley, A. J. 
Zoerb, Walter 
Wintura, Fred 
Packages. 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Sorensen, C. T. F. G. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 

THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers— Coast 
Seamen's JoumaL 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 



When on Gray's Harbor Smoke 

Grandmont Cigars, lOc. 

Union Pilot, 5c. 

Best Union Made Cigars on 
the market. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 
403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

420/2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS 



LEADING JEWELERS AND 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 



Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

BURNETT BROS., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News and 
Drug' Co. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

DRUGS, BOOKS, STATIONERY 

We Specialize on Medicine Chests 

Agt. S. F. Examiner, Chronicle & Call 



Phone 342 



Box 843 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St.. Aberdeen, Wath. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorporated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 376 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 

Valetine (Walter) Zima from Lu- 
biachowo, Kreis Schrimm, Province 
Posen, Germany; last address Sail- 
ors' Union Hall, Seattle. Please 
communicate with Imperial German 
Consul, Seattle, Wash. 

Axel Peterson, F. Lundberg, J. 
Gustafson, M. Garcia, crew of the 
steamer Riverside, at the time she 
towed in the Oceana Vance, kindly 
call at the office of the Charles Nel- 
son Co. for money due them. 

Victor N. Kvenen, a native of 
Belgium, age 32, last heard of in 
Ashtabula, Ohio, April, 1909, inquired 
for by his brother John Kvenen, 
Route 2, Raleigh, Tenn. 



HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

A. W. BARKLEY 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

All Union Made Goods 

203-5 G Street, 
Aberdeen - - - Washington 

STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT, CIRCULA- 
TION, ETC., 

Of Coast Seamen's Journal, published 
weekly at San Francisco, required by the 
Act of August 24, 1912. 

Note— This statement is to be made in 
duplicate, both copies to be delivered by 
the publisher to the postmaster, who 
will send one copy to the Third Assistant 
Postmaster-General (Division of Classi- 
fication), W.-ishington, D. C, and retain 
the other in the files of the postofflce. 
Name of— Postofflce Address. 

Editor, Paul Scharrenberg:, San Francisco. 
Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, San 

Francisco. 
Business Manager, I. M. Holt, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Publisher, Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

San Francisco. 
Owners: (If a corporation, give names 
and addresses of stockholders holding 
1 per cent, or more of total amount 
of stock.) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 
Known bondholders, mortgagees, and 
other security holders, holding 1 per 
cent, or more of total amount of bonds 
mortgages, or other securities: 
None. 
Average number of copies of each issue 
of this publication sold or distributed, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid 
subscribers during the six months pre- 
ceding the date of this statement. 
(This information is required from 
daily newspapers only.) 

I. M. HOLT, 
Business Manager. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me 
tills l!llh day of September, mi.'i. 
ISenl.l CHAS. T. STANT.EY, 

Notary Public in and for the City 
and County of San Francisco, 
State of California. 
(My commission expires August 1914.) 
Form 352G. 



Earl S. Hicks, general manager 
and treasurer of the Hicks-Haupt- 
man Lumber Company, shot himself 
at San Francisco. 

A bill to make violations of the 
Sherman law felonies instead of mis- 
demeanors was introduced by Rep- 
resentative Barclay, of Kentucky. 

A summary of the reclamation en- 
terprises in progress in four States 
of the Northwest showed that $11,- 
000,000 was being expended in fif- 
teen projects. 

The Treasury Department has de- 
posited about $5,000,000 of the $50,- 
000,000 of Government funds to be 
distributed to assist in moving crops, 
principally in Washington, Baltimore 
and Southern cities. 

Bids received by the Navy Depart- 
ment for armor plate for Dread- 
naught 39 were found to be identical. 
Secretary Daniels announced he 
would make an investigation. All the 
bids will be rejected. 

Governor Hodges, of Kansas, ex- 
plained the "Kansas idea" in law- 
making, by which he would abolish 
the "two-house" Legislature and 
would substitute a "one-house," non- 
partisan system. 

Convicts from Joliet Penitentiary 
who were put to work on Illinois 
roads, with the privileges of ordi- 
nary laborers, made an agreement 
among themselves to punish any who 
violated their paroles. 

The Federations of Pullman Con- 
ductors of America and Pullman 
Porters of America were formed at 
Chicago, with the purpose, it was re- 
ported, of making a demand for in- 
creased wages. 

The population ' of San Francisco 
at present is said to be about 465,000, 
according to Deputy School Superin- 
tendent R. H. Webster. This esti- 
mate, which he considers conserva- 
tive, is based on the public school 
attendance. 

That the West was shaping po- 
litical ideas was thought to be shown 
by the fact that bankers of Chicago 
and cities further toward the Pacific 
were more influential in shaping cur- 
rency legislation than New York, 
to whose wishes the Washington 
legislators gave not the slightest 
heed. 

Representative Tavenner, of Illi- 
nois, introduced a bill in Congress 
which provided for an appropriation 
of $1,306,000 for the enlargement of 
the arsenal at Rock Island, III, and 
said the Frankford arsenal, at Phila- 
delphia, could make munitions of war 
cheaper than the prices quoted by 
some private contractors. 

The controversy existing, between 
the Southern Pacific and the Order 
of Railroad Telegraphers for the 
last three months was brought to a 
close September 11 when an agree- 
ment was concluded between W. R. 
Scott, general manager of the rail- 
road, and E. J. Marion, vice-presi- 
dent of the union. 

United States Attorney Charles W. 
Miller, on September 13 added a 
huge vohune to the immense records 
of the (lynaniitc conspiracy trials 
when he forwarded 725 pages, con- 
stituting the Government's brief in 
the appeal of the case to the United 
States Court of Appeals at Chicago. 
It is a remarkably brief document 
when compared to other records in 
the cases, the evidence given in the 
trials last winter alone filling 27,000 
pages and the defendants' bill of ex- 
ceptions constituting five huge vol- 
umes, totaling 6000 pages. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




The Pacific-American Fisheries 
Company, the largest salmon can- 
nery concern on the Coast, pleaded 
guilty at Bellingham, Wash., to thirty 
cases of violation of the child-labor 
law and a total fine and costs of $630 
was paid. More than thirty more 
cases filed against the company were 
dropped, as it was shown that in 
these cases the children had obtained 
permits to work. 

The International Association of 
Machinists is making much progress 
in keeping up with general forward 
movement now being experienced 
throughout the country. The Inter- 
national's increased membership for 
the year of 1912 exceeded 15,000. 
For the month of June, 1913, over 
2,500 additional members have been 
added, and reports indicate the con- 
tinuance of large accessions to the 
membership. 

D. L. Frawley, employed by the 
Senate lobby committee to audit the 
books of the National Association of 
Manufacturers, testified to the com- 
mittee that between 1903 and 1913 
the association paid $245,000 to Mar- 
tin M. Mulhall for legislative and 
campaign work. The audit con- 
firmed in many particulars Mulhall's 
testimony before the committee. The 
association spent more than $2,000,- 
000 in those ten years for all of its 
various activities, Frawley reported. 
The strike of Cincinnati laundry 
workers which was inaugurated a 
week ago by 100 employes, mostly 
girls, in three laundries, took a 
serious aspect when the men and 
girls belonging to the union in nine- 
teen other laundries were called out. 
The union organizer claims that 1,400 
employes are on strike out of a total 
of 2,200 women and men employed 
by laundries in this city. A wage 
scale with a minimum of $7 a week 
for girls and $12 for men is asked by 
the unions. 

John Golden, President of the Uni- 
ted Textile Workers of America, and 
George W. Wrenn, President of the 
Central Labor Union, have been hard 
at work for some time past to secure 
an organization of the textile work- 
ers in Ludlow, Mass. As a result 
a new organization of approximately 
1,000 members has just been com- 
pleted, composed of English, Scotch, 
Poles, and French textile workers. 
A similar organization previously ex- 
isted, but on account of the race 
prejudice when they were involved in 
a strike they were defeated and com- 
pelled to return to work without any 
concessions being secured. 

Mayor Hunt of Cincinnati has just 
handed to J. M. Hutton, a stock 
broker, who demanded that the 
power of the Mayor and police de- 
partment be exercised to drive out 
of that city all labor union agita- 
tors and organizers, the following 
sharp reply to the request made: 
"I have just read with no little sur- 
prise your interview appearing in 
one of the city papers, in which you 
urge me to commit an unlawful act, 
to wit, by arbitrary force, to eject 
labor organizers from this city. You 
are making yourself one with other 
agitators who urge their followers 
on to commit acts of violence. Vio- 
lation on my part of the right of all 
citizens of the United States to 
freely visit this city would be so 
much disobedience to law as if I 
should come to your office with a 
battalion of policemen at my back, 
break into your safe, take its con- 
tents and distribute them among the 
charitable organizations of the city." 



San Francisco Letter List. 



Letters at the San FrancUco Sailors, 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt. Headquarters Sailors" Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abrahamsen, Aslak Anderson, Ernest 



Ahlberg, John 
Alango, .Jack 
Alongo. Peter 
Alstrom. Andrew 
Alver, Ben 
Andersen, A. 
Andersen, Albert 
Andersen, Carl 

Osker 
Andersen. Fred 
Anders. Fred 
Andersen, H. J. 
Andersen, -1526 
Andersen, S. P. 
-^ nderson, A. C. 
Anderson, Alex 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Arnold 
Anderson, Arvid 
Anderson, Carl 
Anderson, David 
Bakher, Haakon 
Ballot, John 
Banks, H. 
Barton, W. F. 
Bastion, U. 
Baumert, -2024 
Bausbeck, Erwin 
T:chrend, P. C. 
Bekker, George 
Bellos, Jack -2036 
Bendsen, Harry 
Bensen, Dick 
Benson, A. 
Benson, Helge 
I'"nson. John E. 
Bentsen, Lars 



Anderson, F. 
Anderson, G. 
.Anderson, Gus 
Anderson, H. 
Anderson. Jim 
Anderson, Josef 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Peter 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson, Thorus 

H. 
Anderson, Uno 
Anderson, Wm. 
Aner. Wm. 
Andreasen, -1477 
Applequest, Otto 
Apsit, J. 
Arndt, Mike 
Arvldsson, Hjalmar 
Asplund. Karl O. 
Ayers, W. D. 
BJornsen, Conrad 
Mlair. Francis 
r;in(ihcini, O. C. 
Blodsing, Aug. 
Bluchner, Frank 
Blumel. W. 
Bode. W. 
Boe, Karl C. 
Boyes. C. 
Pry, George 
Bradley, Clifford 
Brander, W. 
Brandt, Andrew 
Brandt, M. 
Brevick. J. 
Brims, H. W. 



Bergman, Waldemar Bringarud, Harold 

HcTgsirorn, C. " . _ _ - 

Bergciuist, Emil 

Bessesen, O. 

Bierstet -1736 

Bilke, Edw. 

Billi'iston, Martin 

B.KJrkland, Evert 

Caine. V. 

Callon, Jose 

Cambrou, G. C. 

Cannon, Alex. 

Cannon. Ed. 

Carl mark. B. G. 

Carlsen, Lorens 

Carlson, Carl 

Carlson. Oustag 

f'ail.son, O. S. 

CarVon, Thure F. 

Ceelan, John 

Chaler, Buntlata 

Christensen C. 

Chrlstensen, Erllng Cunningham, C. 

Christensen, Fred 



Broscheld, F. O. 
Brownell, 'W. 
Brunei, W. 
Brushard, E. 
Buckley. Richard 
Bung, Richard 

Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, L. 
Christensen. Otto 
Christiansen, Peter. 
Christensen, -905 
Christensen, Robert 

H. 
Christensen, T. K. 
Christesen. Cristens 
Colhurn. Geo. 
Conley, J, H. 
Connor. Wm. 
Cook. Herman 
Corlev. Howard 



Oalil, Ben 
Pahler. H. N. 
I'anlel.son, D. 
Dangelo, Hunzio 
Delias, James 
Dehler, Alfred 
Denver, Geo. W. 
Dillon, Patrick 
Eckhoff, Otto 
Econen. Albert 
Ecstorm, George 
Egeland, O. O. 
Ehringer, F. W. 
Kinardt. John 
Ekendahl, W. 
EScwall, Gust 
Elholm, Peter 
Elisen. Sam 
Elliott. Roney 
For'^gn, William 
Forde, S. C. 
Form, Frank 
Fors. Alfred 
Franke, Karl 
Eraser -740 
Praudsen, L. M. 
Fredrichs, C. 
Fredrickson, Carl 
Gabrielsen. Peter 
G-jrbers, Gustav 
Garbrick, Luis 
Garrlnen, V. 
Gaukka, August 
Gcilnian, P.Jacob 
Gerner, Hans 
Glerahn, Robert 
Giftord, S. 
GIlje, Severln 
Glannus, Alex 
Gorsch, W. 
Grames, Engine 
Grana, Collin 
Granstrom. Nestor 
Grant, David 
Haak, R. 
Haaversen. Nils 
Haggors, Fred 
Hakassars, A. W. 
Hakonsen. Axel 
Haldin, Fred. 
Hammel, Otto 
Hangen -19S0 

llannus, M. 
Hansen, C. T. 
Hansen, Frank 
Hansen, Fred 
Hansen, George 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, Hans 
Hansen, H. G. 
Hansen, H. R. 
Hansen, John P. 
Hanson. Oscar 
Hayes, J. B. 
Hayestrom, V. 
Heart, Charles 
Illig, Theddy 
Irwing, James 
Jackson, Harry 
Jacobsen, Martin 
Jacobsen, O. F. 



Dcering, Erith 
Donovan. John 
Dracar, E. 
Dropan, Lihua 
Duchmann, Fred 
Duks, L. 
Dunbar, L. L. 

Engstrom. Ernest 
Eriksen, Karl H. 
Eriksen -770 
Erickson, Eric 
Erickson, John W. 
Ericson, E. R. 
Eriksen, Emanuel 
Erland, Oscar 
Eskildson. Nils P. 
Evans, S. C. 

Freeman, C. E. 
F oiberg, P. 
FYench, Jack 
Fretzen, B. H. 
Frlck, John 
Fridlund, John 
FrvB. Fritz 
Furth, Richard 

Grantley, C. M. 
Grauberg, Fred 
Griel, Bernhard 
(■Jrossel, Jasef 
Gudmundsen, B. 
Gulbrandsen -1009 
Gulbransen, Bjorn 
Guldbrandscn. Jack 
Gumoes, Frederick 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gundersen, P. 
Gunn. F. D. 
Guslafson, G. 
Gustanson, Olaf 
Guthre, R. 
Gutman, Jack 
Helbertz, Einll 
Helberger, M. 
Held, H. J. 
Helnig, J. 
Helsten, Gus 
Helt. I. 
Helsten, John 
Henriksen. H. 
H. H. -2119 
Hermanson 
Hess, Wm. 
Hewitt 

Hofer, Richard 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hollowes, L. N. 
Hooner, Harbert 
Hoppner, Albert 
Hopstad, Sigurd 
Hrelja, Joseph 
Huntsman, Henry 
Hurst. Jack 

Irwin, Robert 
Iversen, John 
Jens, Otto 
Jarl. Haakon 
Jensen, C. 



Johansen, C. 

.Tohansen, Carl 

Johansen, Chas. 

Joluinsen. E. A. 

Johansen. Emil 

Jnliansen, Halvard Johnson. C. R, 

Joliiisen. Henry Jolinson. E. 



Johnsen, Hans 
Johnson. -2ls»8 
Johnson, Amund 
Johnson, Bernhard 
Johnson, C. E. 



Inhaiison, -1593 
Jnliansen, -2021 
Johanson, Ole 
Jnliansen, Oscar 
Johansson. Johan 
Johansen -1705 



Johnson. Frank 
Johnson, J. Julius 
Johnson, -420 
Johnson, John 
Johnson. Oscar 
Johnson, P. 



Johansen, Harold V. Johnson. Steve 



Johansen, H. B. 
.Tnhansen, W. 
Johanson. -2104 
Johnsen, Oscar 
Johnsen 
Johnsen 
Johnsen, -1343 
Kaare, A. 
Kacymarck, 
Kahlmelster, Otto 
Kallasman, E. 
Kalnin. Ed. 
Kalvetzirjeik, E. 
Kamp, Ed. 
Karger, Fritz 
Karlsen, Gustav 
K.isin, Fritz 
Kardinal, O. 
Karlsen. Hans 
Karneys. Eddie 
Kasick. A. 
Kearns, H. 
Keinanen. Walter 
Kelly. I. F. 



Johnsson, Oscar 
Jones, Chas. 
Jorgensen, Andrew 
Jorgenson, C. 
2148 Jorgensen. Fred 
2213 Julison, C. 



Klausen, C. 
Kleibingat, Fred 
Klemmansen, Eddv 
Klinker, C. J. 
Kllrberg, Chas. 
Kninling, F. 
Kohne, Ernest 
Kramer. Fred 
Krisbjan, A. W. 
Kri.stensen, A. 
Kristiansen, Hans 
Krlslyov. Karl 
Krohn, H. 

Krulisch. Franz Paul 
Kr.vger. Waldemar 
Kuhners. Walter 
Kylandor. Herman 



Kermagoret, AnatoIeKylander, Sherman 



-1333 
-1622 



Jauncey, James F. Jensen, H. R. K 



Jensen, G 

.lensen, George 

.lansen, Hans 

Jansen, Jens B. 

Jensen, M. C. 

Jansen, NIcoIaus 

Jensen, Ole 

Janson, Halvor 



.Tensen, Jens 
Jensen, L. 
Jensen, P. 
Jensen, Robert 
Jespersen, M. 
Johannesen. Anthon 
Johansen. A. F. 
Johansen. Arthur 



Kern, Max 
Kirkpatrick, Cycll 
Lacey. Thoma.<i 
l^angenberg, H. 
Langton. Harry 
Langvardt, Chris. 
I..angwid, Ernest 
Lanner, Rudolph 
Laponble. Jean 
T>arsen, A. B. 
Larsen -1692 

Larsen, Asmus 
Larsen, F. 
Larsen, Johannes 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, -1768 
Larsson, Axel 
Laurensen, Hugh 
Laydon. D. 
Leander, Carl 
Leidsten, Charles 
Lein, G. 
Lekschass, M. 
Leland, F. W. 

Maatson. Olaf 
Mack, Edw. 
Mackav, Alexander 
Madson, M. C. 
Malmquist, Julius 
Manse, Peter 
Marden. Alfred 
Marj. Forvald 
Markman, H. 
Martensen. I. C. 
Martens, Paul 
Martin, T. K. 
Martingsen, R. 
Martin, H. 
Martin, Jack 
Marton. H. 
Mass, Ernst 
Mathews 

Matsinger, Walter 
Matson. Morris 
Mattson, A. M. 
Mattson -1818 
Mattson, C. J. 
Mayes, J. B. 
Mayers, Edgart J. 
McCarty, P. 
McCourt, Josysh 
McGaldrich, James 
McKeating 
Nagel, Alf. 
Nanjack, Gustav 
Nauman, A. E. 
Naystroin. Victor 
Neas. W. 
Nellsen, J. C. 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson, Ed. 
Nelson, Lewis 
Nelson. N. C. 
Nelson, W. 
Nest, Fillp 
Newman, Tom 
Nielsen. Ed. 
Nichander, Dan 
Nick. Peter 
Nicolaisen, Carl 
Nielsen, Jacob 
Niel3on, John 
Oberhauser, John 
Ogilvlc, Willie 
Olerholm. -867 
Oliver, John 
Olman, P. 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, Hans -794 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, O. 
Olsen, Olof D. 
Olsen, -1222 
Olsen. Oscar F. 
Olsen, Oscar Wll- 

helm 
Pahlgren, Pete 
Palndan, C. 
Palyacas 

Patterson, P. A. 
Paulsen, G. 
Pearson. J. T. 
Pearson. J. 8. 
Pedersen, Alfred 
Pedersen -1361 



Kydland. Ole 

Lepsoe, Osear 
Lester, J. O. 
Llnd. Gus 
Lindgren. Gus 
Lindenau, Albert 
Llndquist, -1299 
LIndroth. Carl 
Liscou, C. 
Lister, P. L. 
Lohme, -14S3 
Lolning, Herman 
Lorentzen. A. 
Luding, Edw. 
Luehrs, L. 
Lunbauer, Karl 
Lundberg, Harry 
Lundberg, Thorsten 
Lund. Christopher 
Lundh, Harry 
Lundriuist, A. 
Lundqulst, Ernest 
Lyche. H. 

McMahon, J. T. 
McManus, J. 
Meislahn, Hans 
Mellander, G. L. 
Menelcke, Fritz 
Merthens. H. 
Meyers. Paul 
Meyers, W. 
Michelsen. Alfred 
Milas. Peter 
Milieor, Carl D. 
Miller, Henry 
Miller, W. -2116 
Minor, C. F. 
Moen, Robert 
Mohr, Ernest 
Moller, John 
MoUer, Walter 
Monsen, C. 
Morris, Oscar R. 
Morrison, A. 
Morris, Reuben 
Morse. Harry 
Mossier, Larence 
Murphy, Ch. 
Murphy, Edward 
Murphy, Francis 
Murray, Wm. E. 

Nielsen, N. J. 
Nielsen, Pete 
Nilsen, Anders 
Nilsen, A. 
Nilsen, Anton 
Nilsen, Emil 
Nilsen, Michael 
Nilsen, N. I. 
Nilsen, Nils S. 
Nilson, Axel 
Nolan, George 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nordin, Gus 
Nordstrom, Arthur 
Nordstrom, Victor 
Norman, Fred 
Nurgaard, Anton 
Nylund. John 
Nyman, Oskar 
Olsen, Otto 
Olsen, Marimus 
Olsen, Robert 
Olson, Henrik 
Olsson, -677 
Olsson, -1187 
Opitz, G. 
Orfano. Vappo 
Osterberg, J. 
Osterhoff, H. 
Otto, Willi 
Ounpun, A. 
Owens, Fred 
Owens, John -1158 
Pedersen -1300 
Pedersen, Olav 
Pekman, Ernest 
Pelsckhur 
Pernki, C. 
Persson, C. -678 
Peters, J. 
Petersen, Carl W. 
Petersen, Henning 



Peterson, Ed. 

Peterson, H. 

Peterson. Oscar 
Petersson, Chas. 

Pettersen, J'^edrlck 

Petterson, John G. 

Petterson, Olav 

Petterson, Otto 

Petterson. S. A. 

Raash. Otto 
Radebrecht, Alfred 
Rammerdalil. Knud 
Ransohl, Emil 
Rebman. Chas. 
Redmond, Th. 
Reinhold. Ernest 
Reis, A. 
Rfllas, Jack 
Reshe, G. H. 
Revidan, John 
Rily, C. 
Rivera, A. 
Roalsen. Fred 
Robertsen. R. 
Rohan. Billy 

Saalman. Joseph 
Salo. Yrjo 
Sammis, C. J. 
Samuels. Harold 
Sandstrom. E. 
Savage, Roland 
Schauer. A. 
Scliellenberg, H. 
Scher, G. 
Srhmehl 
.'ichmidt, Ernst 
Schmidt. Hans 
Schneider. H. 
Siliroeder. -2601 
Schroder, Geo. 
Schroder, Hans 
Rchroester. E 
Scknian. Andres 
Senger, George 
Shager. Ernest L. 
Shallies. Chas. 
Shultman. Jacob 
Silva. A. 
Simens, O. L. 
Smith, Donald 
Smith. F. O. 
Smith. G. 
Smith -2126 

Smyth. Wm. 
Soder. J. 
Soderlund. TTno 
.Snheinn. Fritz 
Sohle. Edw. 
Sohne. Edw. 

Tammon. Chr. 
Theodore, P. 
Theorin. John E. 
Thoisell. Chas. 
Thompson, Ch. 
Thornel, Martin 
Thorno. Richard 
Thorsclf. Chas. 
Thorsen, Aksel 
Tlctjen, B. H. 
Tillman, Andrew 
Torgersen, H. 



Pettersson, C. H. 
Petron, A. 
Pfeifer, B. 
Pock, James 
Porin. A. L. 
Proschech, Paul 
Publlcatus. August 
Purgold, G. E. 

Rohland, Max 
Rog, A. 

Rosbeik. Gustav 
Rosenfeld, Paul 
Hose. W. 
Rnslln. R. 
Ross. Bert 
Rounberg, Edward 
Rudherg. Charlie 
Rundqulst. O. 
Russell. Jim 
Ruute. O. 
Ryan. J. R. 
Rydelius, Ralph 
Rylke. Otto 

Sorensen, Hans 
Sorensen. Peter 
Sorers, Hans -2273 
Sovchnes, P. Olaf 
Speikman. Max 
Speller, Henry 
Spilllngton, S. L. 
Splng. James 
Staad, Eigar 
Stahlbaum, Eber- 

hardt 
Stangeland, Peter 
Staniland. Herbeit 
Staph, Andreas 
Stedman, Frank 
Stolt, A. J. 
.Strand, Konrad 
Strand, Louis 
Strauss. Walter 
Stromsberg. Ivar 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Sundholm, Franz 
Sundqulst, Ernest 
Svedstrup, E. 
Svenson, -1295 
Svenson, -2675 
Svenson, E. 
Swanson, Ben. 
Swanson. Chas. 
Swanson. L. E. 
Swan.son. Ole 
Swan. W. S. 
Swarthey. Jack 
Swarthey. Norman 

Torpensen. Guwald 
Torsgren. Carl 
Torstenson. F. 
Tovares. Antonio 
Trantmann. Paul 
Trede, Hans 
Treucrek 
Truback. H. 
Tupplt. C. 
Turnqulst 
Twalg. F. 
Twede. J. 



TThllg. Carl TT.sar. T. 

Ursln. J. Usolv. I. 

Valetlnsen, G. , Volkanen, Veda 

Valttl. Jalmar Verney. A. 

Van Katwyk. John VIeon, C. L. 

Van Rosnalan. Void, O. P. 

Vehire, J. J. Voss. Heinrlch 



Walch. Michael 
WaUlliousp. John 
Wall us. Fred 
Walters, Henry 
Wathsted, Albert 
Welch, T.,. 
WoUs. Feo. 
Wendel, Emil 
Wertli, Gustav 
Westman. Andrew 
Weyor. Paul 
Whinner. W. 
Whiteworth 

Yanger, I. 
Zechel, Walter 
Zlehr, Ernest 
Zoe, Frank 



Wickstrom, Axel 
Wilohlm. Edward 
■V^•illlamson. W. A. 
Willman, Willy 
IVIlson. Harry 
Wilsen, J. 
Wilson, John E. 
Winblact. M. M. 
Wind. Jacob -1351 
Winther, Johan 
Wolferen. Svan 
Wrig, Ferdlnant 

Toivola, Gust 
Zorb. W. 
Zorlng, Arthur 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of th* Paclfle. 



Anderson, A. 
Anderson, Anders 
Balda. A. 
Brander, M. F. 
Huas, Tomas 
Cain, P. 

Christoffersen, Olaf 
Ellefsen, Otto 
Faulkner, J. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
<;innoes. F. 
Oustavsen. Alfred 
Hansen, Karl 
Iversen, Reidar 
Johanson, Nils A. 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Jorgensen. Oluv 
Karsten. Hugo B. 
Katwijk. J. W. 
Knappe. Adolph 
Korsberg. Wolmar 
LIndroth, Erik 



Lundgren, K. O. 
Maatson, Olaf 
Morris 

Nelsson, Hasmund 
Olsen. -1244 
Prleberg. P. 
Funis, Antony 
Quarsell, Wm. 
Raasch, O. 
RasmuKsen. B. 
Rose, Wm. H. 
Rutter, T. 
Skardinal, Otto 
Straus, Walter 
Summers. James 
Torkildsen, Jonas 
Trondsen, J. M. 
Wakely. R. B. 
Walters. A. 
Welsen. Julius 
Wlllander, -876 



Pt. TowntenJ Letter Lut. 



Andersen. E. T. 
Alango, John 
Hermansen. L. 
Johansen, John 
Johnson, Ole 
Moore, George 



Mertz, George E. 
Nachtigall, H. 
Rosbeck. Gustaf 
Shold, Chas. A. 
Varner, C. 
Wilson, Gus 



All Aboard! 
SEABOARD HOTEL 

228 East Street, near Howard 

New Seven-story Concrete Building — Modern and Up-to-Date 

250— ROOMS— 250 



Running Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 

Free Shower and Tub Baths 

ELEVATOR SERVICE— ELECTRIC LIGHT 

Call Bell in Every Room — Fine Lobby and Reading Room 



Open All Night 

35c to $1.00 per Day $2.00 to $4.00 per Week 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Room» 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt 

and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30. 1913: 

Assets $55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up In 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 
Employees' Pension Fund.. 158,261.32 
Number of Depositors 62,134 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. 
for receipt of deposits only. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and BO cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 




CAPT. CHAS. J. 
SWANSON 

Classy Clothier 

Hatter and Furnisher 

Douglas Shoes 

Uniforms 



Gold Braid and Gold 

Wreaths of All 

Descriptions 



139 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and 
Washington 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 1082 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 



HOTEL EVAN^f 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. 8. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $6.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. OfHce 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Kearny 2603 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.76 per 
Week up. 
Hot and Cold Water In E^ve^y Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 



Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia— All Union Mad« 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checlcs 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



B. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tliis Label is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 



Union 



MADE 

Beer 




•Ale 

AND 

Porter 



^5>o Of America ^0>^ 

COPYRICHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^^ i^^l %^ 9 W^^ I 2t fi^r ^^^ blue) appears on the box in 



which you are served. 



Issued by AuU)o(it>of uie Ciga; MaKefs' Imetnallonal Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

Z\U$ (ittisHtf. IM (ta Ofn cottiined Inttili Vn hiM twn mM bft riCt-CUSS WIINUI 

i HtlUtR or THC IXM UUten 'IKICfllUTIOOU UMOKtf AaviU. in oruiUJta iJevoted tl tf» ad- 

wnctie/ii of ttc MORAl JilATDilMml Himncnui WlirAIit OF M OiATI. Tlanfon m tianmai 

UwM Ci9*c U} Hi ioakm thtauthout the woiU 

' UWtingunuiicoathuLitaltfbtpunuMaccorAi^ttlML 



' SIMILE 



^ Tic (^A4etMC. PKodtnt. 
V curuoi 



yf A m m cA 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't, No. 1 State 
street. New York. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST. t San Francisco 

Phone Dougla* 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

Carlsen ^ Marchand 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

10 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Bet. East and Steuart Sts. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Lasker Munter, of Spokane, Wash- 
ington, born 1884, left home in 1903, 
is inquired for by his father, Adolph 
Munter, Spokane, Washington. 

John Hansen, who was lookoutman 
on the S.S. "Argyll" some months 
ago, is wanted by the Union Oil Co. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify the manager Marine 
Department, Mr. Walter G. Tubby, 

Michael D. Harrington, who has 
been sailing on 'the Pacific Coast 
since 1910; last heard of on vessel 
sailing from San Francisco to Seat- 
tle; anyone knowing his whereabouts 
I please notify Dennis J. Harrington, 
,care of Winthrops Yacht Supply Co., 
Winthrops Beach, Mass. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION ilADC 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglai 1660 




INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Johan Nilsen, a native of 
Sandefjord, Norway, aged about 33, 
left his home at 1164 Prtrero Ave., 
Sunday, August 17th. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Coast Seamen's Journal. 




Monks, guided by the barkings of 
their St. Bernard dogs rescued an 
American who had fallen into an 
Alpine ravine. 

Militant suffragettes tried to burn 
Dulwich College, a famous school 
in the suburbs of London, setting 
fire to the building in two places. 

A tobacco war is expected shortly 
in England, the Tobacco Products 
Corporation of America being about 
to seek control of the English mar- 
ket. 

Letters captured from the Greek 
troops during the recent war be- 
tween the Balkan allies have been 
published by Bulgaria to prove Greek 
atrocities. 

Provisional President Yuan, of 
China, issued a decree announcing 
lie would resign on the restoration 
of peace, according to a Mukden dis- 
patch. 

Two thousand male inhabitants 
of the district of Kutais, in the Rus- 
sian Trans-Caucasus, have been im- 
prisoned to enforce the delivery of 
a murderer to the authorities. 

Dr. Douglas Mawson, the Antarctic 
explorer, and five companies narrow- 
ly escaped starvation, a relief ship 
arriving at Macquarie Island just in 
time to save their lives. 

Fifty thousand persons attended 
the funeral of the workman slain 
by the police in a Dublin strike. 
Four hundred Dublin employers 
have agreed on a lockout of the 
strikers. 

An American-Japanese parliamen- 
tary union for the encouragement of 
friendly relations was organized by 
the groups of delegates representing 
the two nations at the interparlia- 
mentary conference at The Hague. 

Moritaro Abe, director of the po- 
litical bureau of the Japanese Foreign 
Office, was stabbed in Tokio. The 
attempt at assassination may have 
been due to the political excitement 
resulting from the dispute with the 
United States. 

The final results of the recent elec- 
tions to the Finnish Diet, which are 
now available, show that the new 
Chamber will be constituted as fol- 
lows: Social Democrats, 90; Old 
Fins, 2)?); Young Fins, 29, Swedes, 
23; Agrarians, 28. 

The "Neue Freie Presse" prints a 
report from Adrianople of the kill- 
ing of five Turkish officers and the 
wounding of twenty other persons 
in a fight which resulted from a 
f|uarrel between Young Turks and 
I)artisans of Nazim Pasha. 

The German military airship L-1 
was wrecked in a hurricane in the 
North Sea recently. The loss of 
life is estimated at sixteen, among 
tlie dead being Captain Metzing, 
commander of the marine airship 
division. 

The aviator Pegoud, flying in a 
monoplane at Juvisy, France, de- 
scribed a gigantic letter S while at 
a height of 3000 feet. For a quar- 
ter of a mile he was flying upside 
down. The achievement is declared 
to be epoch-making in the attain- 
ment of safety in the air. 

A wireless communication was sent 
over 10,000 miles recently by means 
of the flagship "Australia." which is 
traveling from Durbanc to Albany, 
Queensland. A message from the 
Governor of New Zealand to Lord 
Gladstone at Pretoria was sent from 
Wellington to the high power station 
at Sydney, thence to Perth, and 
thence via the "Australia," in mid- 
ocean to Cape Town and Durbane. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



Wanted. — "Did the doctor tell you 
what you had?" 

"No. He took what I had without 
telling me." — I.ife. 



Reckless Spender. — Saphedde — It 
costs me $25,000 a year to live. 

Miss Caustique — How foolishly 
some people spend their money! — 
Philadelphia Record. 



Weather Note. — A heavy bunch of 
clouds passed over Hogvvallow yes- 
terday bound for a Sunday-school 
picnic in progress near Rye Straw. — 
Paducah Hogwallow Kentuckian. 



Impossibility. — "No man can serve 
two masters," observed the good par- 
son who was visiting the peniten- 
tiary. 

"I know it," replied Convict 1313. 
"I'm in here for bigamy." — Cincin- 
nati Enquirer. 



Subtle Revenge.— Two young boot- 
blacks who have stands close togeth- 
er on Tremont Street quarreled the 
other day. "I'll get even with that 
guy yet," vowed the smaller boy of 
the two. 

"Goin' to fight him, are yer, Jim- 
my?" he was asked. 

"Naw! When he gets troo polishin' 
a gent I'm goin' to say ter that 
gent soon's he steps oflf the chair: 
'Shine, sir, shine!' "—Boston Trans- 
cript. 



Tip to the Ambitious. — Louis J. 
Horowitz, the sky-scraper builder, 
who in twenty years has risen from 
a position of $3 a week to one of 
$100,000 a year, was talking about 
success. 

"I go to bed at 9 o'clock," he 
said, "and I get up at 5 o'clock. T 
play a little, but my play is exercise 
to keep me in good trim for my of- 
fice. I play to work — as other men 
work to play." 

Mr. Horowitz mused a moment; 
then in his terse, epigrammatic way 
he said, shaking his head: 

"Success demands sacrifice! Two 
men set out to achieve fame. One 
succeeded. The other lived.'— "Wash- 
ington Star 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Ectabllshed 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL, 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who hjis only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education. Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographlc and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



\ 



J. COHEN &i CO. 

Baltimore ClotKin^ Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 



Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 



Demand the Union Label 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 
money In a reliable savings bank. If 
you are making money now, why not 
put aside something for a rainy day? 

Savings and Commercial Depts., 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth, 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 




UNION 



MA.DB 




Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 



JqrmM j?. Sorensen 
^09 and Jf*t^ 



Eyes Examined Free Repairing Our Specialty 

WE DO REPAIRING 

ScmmmCa 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 Market Street., Near Call Building 

2593 Mission Street, Near 22nd Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

THE LARGEST JEWELRY STORE, WITH THE LARGEST 
STOCK AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



"N&s Retail Center" 




^Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James 11. 
Barry Co. 

'THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

Has Moved from 610 THIRD ST. to 

693 THIRD ST., opposite the 

Southern Pacific Depot at 3d 

and Townsend Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Qoods, Hata, Capi, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-claas goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Nam* 
and Number. 



.^^'VS/V^'»^.'V^^^/S/S^W^W"^^S/VS^V>^Ni'SA^VWS/S*N^ 



CJifiBusitH 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



SI 









FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD, 
Official Paper of tht International Seamen'i Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVII, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1913. 



Whole No. 2245. 



THE ATLANTIC COAST SITUATION. 



The following statement of facts regarding 
the Atlantic District, submitted by the Inter- 
national secretary-treasurer, is published for the 
information of all members of the International 
Seamen's Union of America and others who 
may be interested: 

Officers and Members, International Seamen's 
Union of America: 

Comrades — In order that every member of 
the International Union may know the facts 
concerning the situation in the Atlantic Dis- 
trict, I submit this statement for publication in 
the Journal, in addition to the reports I have 
already sent to all district unions. 

Shortly after the adjournment of the Seattle 
Convention it became apparent that some de- 
cisive action was necessary and unavoidable. 
The Executive Board, therefore, after very care- 
ful consideration and investigation, decided to 
grant a charter to the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' 
Association. Such charter was accordingly is- 
sued on August 27, 1913. 

Following the decision of the Seattle Con- 
vention and by further action of the Executive 
Board, the charter of the Atlantic Coast Sea- 
men's Union, later called the Sailors' Union of 
the Atlantic, and now calling itself the "Sailors' 
and Firemen's Union of the Atlantic," was re- 
voked (1) because it had repeatedly opposed the 
efforts of the International Seamen's Union of 
America to secure legislation at the hands of 
Congress, (2) because it had adopted a system 
of organization entirely at variance with the 
form of organization prevailing in the Interna- 
tional Union, and (3) because it had repeatedly 
and deliberately misquoted and misrepresented 
the aims, objects and principles of the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America. 

The charter supposedly held by the "Sailors' 
and Firemen's Union of the Atlantic," which was 
really the original charter issued to the old At- 
lantic Coast Seamen's Union, was thereupon re- 
called. The main charter was duly returned to 
this office without delay, and there are now out- 
standing only a few sub-charters or branch char- 
ters which for some reason have not yet been 
sent in, although, as you all know, they are en- 
tirely void and of no value without the main 
certificate of affiliation now no longer in exist- 
ence. 

For many years the Atlantic District was in 
entire harmony with the other districts of the 
International Union in regjffd to the general 
policy to be followed. It was not until the In- 
ternational arrived at a point where success was 
visible in the legislative field that the opposi- 
tion by Atlantic officials suddenly developed, 
going to such an extent that some of them ac- 
tually appeared before a Congressional commit- 
tee protesting against the passage of the Sea- 
men's Bill. 

This, of course, cannot justly be, and is not, 
charged up to the entire membership of the so- 
called "Sailors' and Firemen's Union." On the 



contrary, it is well known that several of its 
branches adopted strong resolutions urging Con- 
gress to enact the legislation sorely needed by 
the seamen, but bitterly opposed by shipowners. 
But, nevertheless, representatives of the organ- 
ization went to Washington, as the Congression- 
al records will prove, and opposed the enact- 
ment of legislation which would benefit the men 
on the Atlantic even more than those in other 
districts. 

It is a well-known fact that the very men 
who saw fit to suddenly change front and to 
work against the interest of seamen in that re- 
spect, had formerly themselves introduced reso- 
lutions favoring the very legislation which they 
afterwards so strenuously and strangely opposed. 
To further this opposition other disagreements, 
real or imaginary, arose and were energetically 
fostered by the opponents of the International 
Union, until the Firemen's Union of the Atlantic 
became disorganized, and the one time promis- 
ing Atlantic Coast Seamen's Union found itself 
in an almost constant internal turmoil, its mem- 
bership and funds depleted by mismanagement, 
to a point where a considerable number of its 
members who desired to remain loyal to the In- 
ternational movement rebelled and formed the 
new organization which, as herein stated, was 
eventually chartered by the International Sea- 
men's Union. 

The Eastern and Gulf Sailors' Association is 
now the only union of sailors in the Atlantic 
District affiliated with the International Sea- 
men's Union of America. As such it is entitled 
to the cooperation and support of all district 
unions and to full recognition from all organized 
labor, including the American Federation of 
Labor, and the various city central bodies and 
State federations. It has been in existence 
since February, 1913, and made its first applica- 
tion for a charter on April IS. That application 
was referred to the Seattle Convention which 
met in May and formulated plans whereby it 
was hoped that harmony among the Atlantic 
sailors could have been restored had the neces- 
sary cooperation been extended by all concerned. 
But in place of assisting to harmonize matters, 
action was taken by some of the dissenters to 
further obstruct. 

On July 8, the Eastern and Gulf Sailors' As- 
sociation again applied for a charter. After fur- 
ther consideration and investigation, and allow- 
ing time for the Executive Council of the Amer- 
ican Federation of Labor to look into the mat- 
ter, it was decided that the policy of the Inter- 
national regarding the very important subjects 
of legislation and form of organization should 
be maintained and defended, and that steps 
would therefore have to be taken to protect the 
International and its district unions in that 
respect. In accordance with this the Executive 
Board, as already stated, granted the charter, 
which was issued on August 27. This action the 
board firmly believes was absolutely necessary 
for the best interests of the membership at 
large and in accordance with the laws and rules 
of the general labor movement. 

We recently issued a statement on the Atlan- 
tic situation to the American Federation ot 
Labor, which had offered its services, from 
which the following is an excerpt: 

"In order that our decision not to accept the 



suggestion providing for the appointment of a 
committee may not be misunderstood, let me say 
that the most important question at issue is that 
of legislation, practically all other differences 
having arisen during the dispute on that one 
question. The leaders of the so-called Sailors' 
and Firemen's Union of the Atlantic have since 
the latter part of the year 1911 persistently at- 
tacked the Seamen's Bill. For many years 
previous to that these same officers had been, 
from all outward appearances, as eager for the 
enactment of the bill as any of us. It was not 
until it became apparent that we had some real 
chance to secure its passage and when the ship- 
owning interests became most bitter in their 
fight against it, that these men changed front 
and began their attacks. 

"Our experience indicates pretty clearly that 
any compromise with the 'Sailors' and Firemen's 
Union of the Atlantic' would necessarily involve 
a compromise on the question of legislation. 
We cannot agree to anything of that kind; it 
would be wrong, disastrous to the best interests 
of all seamen, especially now when we believe 
our hopes will be realized by the present Con- 
gress, and when we feel that our efforts to se- 
cure justice, in which we have had the unfailing 
support of the A. F. of L. and its Executive 
Council, will soon be realized." 

On September 15, Secretary Morrison of the 
American Federation of Labor, replying to a 
letter from this office, sent me a copy of a letter 
addressed to the Central Federated Union of New 
York City, in which the following instruction 
appears: "The Central Federated Union is there- 
fore directed to enforce Section 1, Article XI, 
of the Constitution of the American Federation 
of Labor and unseat delegates of the independent 
union of sailors and firemen of the Atlantic and 
seat delegates from the Eastern and Gulf -Sailors' 
Association, regularly chartered by the Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America, which is af- 
filiated with the American Federation of Labor." 

No doubt, therefore, can now be entertained 
by anyone as to the good standing of the East- 
ern and Gulf Sailors' Association in the general 
labor movement. No sailor should hesitate in 
joining that organization. Its headquarters are 
at lyi Lewis street, Boston, Mass., on the 
premises formerly occupied by the old Atlantic 
Coast Seamen's Union, and at the present writing 
it has already established branches at 40 Soutli 
street, New York City, and at 10.S4 Magazine 
street. New Orleans, La. Branch charters have 
been issued to those ports, and other hrancli 
charters will be promptly furnished when needed. 

It is the intention of the T. S. U. of A. to 
maintain itself on the Atlantic Coast as else- 
where through district unions that really repre- 
sent seamen, that are under the control and 
direction of seamen, conducted for the lienefit 
of seamen and the general labor movement. To 
do this it became necessary, in defcn';c of the 
principles of our movement, for the Executive 
Board to take action with reference to charters 
as herein reported. 

With kindest regards to all comrades, T remain 
Fraternally yours. 

T._ A. HANSON, 

Secretary-Treasurer International Seamen's 
Union of America. 

Chicago, 111., Sept. 20, 1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BY THE WAY. 



Another Clay-Footed Idol. 

At a luncheon tendered in his honor by 
the Commonwealth Club of San Francisco, 
Secretary of the Interior Lane, in the 
colirse of "a few appropriate remarks," etc., 
is reported to have said : 

"It is the men who are really doing 
things that we must protect in this country 
to-day." 

At first blush, and casually scanning the 
quoted remark by itself, one might easily 
be excused for inferring that Secretary 
Lane was pleading for protection for the 
workingmen of the country, the producers 
of all its wealth — "the men who are really 
doing things." This inference is all the 
more warranted when one remembers the 
alleged "popularity" of Mr. Lane, and that 
he is one of the foremost spokesmen of 
"the most democratic government we have 
ever had." 

But, alas! the context of the Secretary's 
remark reveals that he had in mind, not 
"the men who are really doing things," 
but the privileged few who are industri- 
ously engaged in "doing" all the rest of 
us. That is, he was publicly and frankly 
pleading the cause of special privilege. 

Tr-uly a remarkable attitude for a Demo- 
cratic statesman of Secretary Lane's emi- 
nence to assume! The life, the substance, 
the very breath of the Democratic party, 
are supposedly drawn from the gospel of 
"equal rights to all, special privileges to 
none." Take away that gospel from its 
professed tenets, and there would be abso- 
lutely no justification whatever for the ex- 
istence of the Democratic party. 

It is somewhat of a shock, therefore, to 
behold the Secretary of the Interior un- 
blushingly coming to the defense of spe- 
cial privilege. It is as though one had 
had a sudden glimpse beneath the drapery 
of a long cherished idol, and discovered 
that its feet were made of clay. This 
because of the prevailing estimate of Mr. 
Lane's brand of democracy. He has been 
widely heralded as "a man of the people," 
"a democrat in the truest sense of the 
word," "a staunch champion of labor," and 
much more to the same general effect. All 
of which makes his reported fall from 
grace just that much more regrettable. 

But surprises of that kind are, after all, 
so frequent in public life as to greatly 
strengthen the paradoxical doctrine that it 
is the unexpected that always happens. 
For Secretary Lane's reversal of form was 
distinctly unexpected ; especially so to 
workingmen, who had been led to believe 
that he was, not only with them, but of 
them. Well, " 'tis a long Lane that has 
no turning," which makes the turning none 
the less painful to watch when it is just 
one more case of "another good man gone 
wrong." 

What the Sam Hill—! 
Speculation may be idle, 
Theorizing vainer still ; 
But (odd whims are hard to Ijridle) — 
Who the devil is Sam Hill? 



Well, brethren, we've come to the pass 
in our civilization where the right to work, 
like kissing, goes by favor. Worse than 
that. More often than not you have to 
bribe someone to get a job. After you've 
got it you have to keep on bribing some 
other bloodsucker to hold it. Oh, yes, ours 



is a "wondrously complex civilization," all 
right — too hopelessly complex, in fact, to be 
any good. For that wliich is good is al- 
ways simple in nature, straightforward, 
easily understood, sane and normal. And 
our brand of civilization is none of these 
things. 



"PROGRESS AND POVERTY." 



"Without tlic lasli of poverty there would 
l>e no incentive to work." True, Mike ; 
every word of it — except the last. Instead 
of writing it "work'' it should be "slavery." 
Work — creative work — is unanimously con- 
ceded to be a blessing. And w-e surely do 
not need a lash to drive us to seek a 
blessing! How about that, Alike? With- 
out the lash of poverty there would be no 
incentive to wage-slavery. That's it ; ain't 
it? 



The cost of living may be higher than 
ever, but, as a merciful offset, life is get- 
ting cheaper and cheaper every day. Read 
the daily fatalities reported by the news- 
papers, my boy, and get wised up on 
what a live people we are. 



A hint to statesmen — Tax al! unused 
land, or land used for non-productive pur- 
poses, its full rental value. Then lie back 
in your easy chairs and watch a back-to- 
the-land movement what am a movement. 
N. B. — Don't let the real estate or land- 
sharks in on this, or it'll be all off. 



"Waste not, want not" is a maxim the 
wisdom of which does not particularly 
impress the man who never had anything 
to waste, yet always lived in want. 



A strong pull, a long pull, and a pull 
ail together for the co-operative common- 
wealth ! The cause expects every man this 
day to do his duty. 



The man who wrote, "You can't have 
too much of a good thing," had evidently 
never suffered from "an embarrassment of 
riches." 



The leader who has "the right dope" is 
the only leader to follow ; all the others 
are jack-'o-lantern obscurantists. Puzzle : 
Find "the right dope." 



Good wine needs no bush, but a good 
cause is all the better for a little honest 
criticism. 



Fellow workers: Live fraternally, or- 
ganize industrially, fight politically, vote 
wisely, and the world is yours. 



Men are the sport of circumstances when 
The circumstances seem the sport of men. 

— Byron. 



Show me what thou readest and I will 
tell thee what thou art. Read nothing, 
know nothing. 



Liberty without self-restraint is vastly 
more degrading than any slavery. 



What's the Golden Rule between friends? 
-Xsk Gallagher. 



Worthless thoughts make worthless men. 



Senator Norris of Nebraska, in advoca- 
ting an inheritance tax amendment to the 
tariff bill, used young Vincent Astor as a 
horrible example. Young Astor, he said, 
has inherited $80,000,000, whicli he did not 
earn. The amendment proposed would, so 
Senator Norris said, take $43,000,000 of 
tliis for pul)lic use and -Xstor could continue 
to live in luxurious idleness off of the re- 
maining $37,000,000. 

It is much to be feared that Senator 
Norris sees only half the truth, which is, 
however, a much larger proportion than 
most of his colleagues see. It is true that 
Vincent Astor has a fortune which he has 
not earned. That fortune, however, does not 
consist of money, but of legalized power 
to appropriate the earnings of others. That 
power is capitalized at $80,000,000 because 
it enables Astor to take earnings every 
year from others ecjual to about a year's 
interest on that sum. His power comes 
from ownership of land in New York City, 
nil which New Yorkers must live and work. 
An inheritance tax, such as Senator Norris 
proposes, will still leave him with power 
to appropriate the earnings of others, but 
not to the same extent as now. Now, how 
would Senator Norris have his inheritance 
tax collected? Astor does not have $80,- 
000,000 in cash. In order to pay $43,000,- 
000 inheritance tax he would either have to 
sell or mortgage that much land or the 
Government would seize and sell it for 
him. In either case how much better off 
would the people be whose earnings Astor 
now appropriates? The new owners of 
the $43,000,000 worth of land would take 
that much of what Astor now takes and 
he would continue to take the rest. What 
Senator Norris should advocate is taking 
by government of the rental values that 
now go into the pockets of Astor and other 
land monopolists. Then all tariffs and all 
other taxes on labor could be abolished and 
no one would appropriate anything pro- 
duced by others. The American people 
could then have access to the natural re- 
sources of the country without paying trib- 
ute to Astor or anyone else, and the object 
which Senator Norris hopes, but would not 
attain through his proposed inheritance 
tax, would be reached. 



Capitalism must be destroyed! 

El Tuerto. 



The Canadian Parliament is one of the 
few parliaments in the world where speeches 
in two languages are allowed. This, of 
course, is due to the large French and Eng- 
lish elements in Canada. Naturally this 
leads to scenes which seem novel to one ac- 
customed to British politics. For instance, 
when the Canadian House of Commons is 
sitting in committee, should a French- 
Canadian start to address the house in 
French, you may see the English chairman 
retire from his seat and allow a French 
chairman to take his place. In the same 
manner the official English reporters cease 
work and a staff of French shorthand 
writers begin. 



The earliest successful locomotive in Eng- 
land was completed just 100 years ago. It 
was named "Puffing Billy." The owner was 
warned that "if the noise of the engine dis- 
turbs the cattle grazing in the lands adjacent 
to the wagon way (railway), so as to put 
them off their feed, it may be considered a 
nuisance." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Barred the Union Label. 

Despite a vigorous fight waged on the 
floor of the congress, the Improved Order 
of Red Men, who opened their sixty-sixth 
Great Sun session in Washington, D. C, 
recently, refused to recognize the labor un- 
ions. Representative Frank C. Smith of 
Illinois, during the morning session, intro- 
duced a resolution calling for the recogni- 
tion of labor unions by printing upon all 
stationery of the order the allied trade 
unions' stamp. When his resolution was 
introduced Great Incohonee Carl Foster 
ruled it out of order on the ground that 
the order did not engage in politics or in 
religion. An appeal was immediately taken 
by Mr. Smith and the motion put to a vote. 
Excitement reigned in the hall as the vote 
was taken, but it was seen that the labor 
unions were to be denied. The represent- 
atives sustained the Great Incohonee, and 
the labor unions were defeated by a great 
majority. As a result, the union label will 
not appear on any of the printing of the 
order. 



Labors' Dividends Higher. 

Most people have probably forgotten that 
the railroads are still trying to forestall, or 
at least minimize, a wage advance demand- 
ed by the conductors and trainmen on the 
fifty-two Eastern roads. The board of arbi- 
tration named by the companies and the 
labor unions has not been sitting through 
the summer, but will meet soon for organ- 
ization. The tendency in recent years has 
been for labor to absorb more and more 
of the revenues of the railroads. In 1902 
wages consumed 38.9 cents out of every 
dollar paid to the carriers. In 1912 labor 
got 43.9 cents. In the ten years following 
1902 the total operating revenues of all rail- 
roads in this country increased 64.6 per 
cent., while operating costs increased 75.5 
per cent., and wages 84.9 per cent. At that 
rate wages would finally absorb the entire 
margin of profit if not checked by an in- 
crease in rates or wholesale reductions in 
the number of men engaged in the trans- 
portation business. 



Miners' Rescue Work. 

On September 22, 23, and 24 Pittsburgh 
will be invaded by prominent mining men, 
surgeons of mining companies, and the 
miners connected with the rescue and first- 
aid work from many parts of the United 
States. Western Pennsylvania and the 
Pittsburgh district in particular will be 
largely represented. H. M. Wilson, of the 
American Mine Safety Association, says 
that the reports received indicate the meet- 
ing will be very largely attended by men 
interested in the safety of their mining 
operations. An interesting program of 
papers and discussions has been prepared. 
J. W. Paul, of the Bureau of Mines, re- 
ports that the arrangements for the mine 
rescue contest, which will be held at Ar- 
senal Park on September 22, assures the 
success of this unusual event. Handsome 
prizes have been ofifered for the men who 
compete in showing their skill in doing 
rescue and recovery work at mines. There 
will be held a first-aid contest somewhat 
similar to those held elsewhere in the 



mining regions. For this a number of 
handsome prizes have also been received. 
The Bureau of Mines has arranged a big 
experimental explosion at their mine at 
Bruceton. This will be the first explosion 
exhibit given at the mine since its comple- 
tion. On September 23, however, it will be 
possible for those interested in such mat- 
ters to see just exactly what causes the 
explosion, how the explosion wave acts, the 
speed and the pressure and other important 
items, as these will all be automatically re- 
corded in the instrument room. A number 
of rescue men, fitted with artificial breath- 
ing apparatus, will enter the mine imme- 
diately after the explosion, so as to il- 
lustrate how they can go into a mine still 
smoking and full of gas immediately after 
a disaster. 



Will They Do It? 

Coincident with the incorporation at 
Springfield, of the Federation of Pullman 
Conductors of America and the Federation 
of Pullman Porters of America, a rumor 
was started here to the effect that these 
organizations might be the first steps to- 
ward the forming of a real union of the 
15,000 or 20,000 conductors and porters em- 
ployed by the Pullman Company. Up to 
the present time, all efiforts at organiza- 
tion along union lines have been frustrated 
by the company, although the conductors 
have a mutual benefit association and the 
porters have several local fraternal bodies. 
That the Pullman employes certainly need 
a union to protect their interests is evi- 
dent from the fact that the conductors' 
wages range from but $70 to $95 per 
month, and the colored porters are paid 
only from $25 to $40 a month. Either 
class of employes is absolutely helpless in 
case a cranky official exercises the right of 
discharge or discipline. 

Notwithstanding the fact that a Pullman 
conductor has to be a man of the greatest 
tact in handling the public, and the porters 
have to stand for all sorts of abuse, they 
are treated with very little consideration 
by the company which exploits them. 



Defeated the Tobacco Trust. 

Macedonia is a great tobacco growing 
province, and some years ago huge syndi- 
cates took the trade in hand, with the usual 
wage-cutting results. This compelled both 
growers and workers to organize them- 
selves, and several successful strikes oc- 
curred. When wages had been forced up 
again to the extent of about 45 per cent, 
the capitalists decided to stop competition 
among themselves. A great trust was 
formed, and set itself to reduce the workers 
to a state almost of serfdom. However, 
the trade union has undauntedly continued 
its counter organization, with the result 
that 60,000 members were enrolled. There 
were more strikes and fresh victories for 
the wage-earners. Finally, the capitalists 
resolved, if possible, to crush the union 
altogether, by means of a lockout. This 
determination was reached just before the 
outbreak of hostilities in the Balkans. 
Meetings were prohibited, and leaders ar- 
rested. Misery and starvation were every- 
(Coatinued on Page 11.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of .America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of .'\ustralasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port .Adelaide, South .^us- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards .\5sociation of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 
Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 
Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 
Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 
Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Kolien- 
havn, 

.Sofyrhodernes Forhund, St. Annaplads 22. 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algcmeene Ncdcrlandsche Zeemansbond. Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicadc de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocincros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y ]\Iarincros, Calic Ingln- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Fcdcracion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (.Mtos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Rcmandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centre Maritimo dos Empregados em Caniara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio dc Janeiro. 

""" SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Practically all the patternmakers in 
London, England, to the number of 
700, are out on strike for a stand- 
ing wage of £2 10s. a week. An 
official of the Amalgamated Society 
of Engineers said that the strike 
would be confined to London, and 
that, although a conference was pend- 
ing between the union and the em- 
ployers, the men would not go back 
until their demands were met in 
full. 

The decree promised by the Span- 
ish government to settle the strike 
of textile workers at Barcelona was 
published recently. A sixty-hours' 
week is the chief provision, and 
heavy fines will be inflicted upon 
employers who contravene the regu- 
lations. The money thus obtained 
will be paid into the men's sick funds. 
An association for the protection of 
the workers' rights has been formed, 
and members of all parties on the 
Left have joined it. 

The report on the mines and quar- 
ries in the Newcastle (England) dis- 
trict states that 114 fatal accidents re- 
sulted in 116 deaths, all being single 
fatalities except one case of a fall 
of ground and another case of pre- 
mature explosion of a shot, causing 
the loss of two lives in each case. 
Of the fatal accidents, 11 causing 
12 deaths occurred in Cumberland; 
55 causing 55 deaths, occurred in Dur- 
ham (North), and 48 causing 49 
deaths occurred in Northumberland. 

The plumbers at St. Thomas, Ont., 
made a demand for an increase, but 
because their employers appeared not 
disposed to grant the increase im- 
mediately, a strike was called. The 
ofiicials of the Labor Council took 
the matter in hand and secured an 
adjustment of the difficulty. The em- 
ployers have now agreed to pay a 
scale of 35 cents per hour until 
November 1, when it will be further 
raised to 37}/2 cents per hour, this 
being the scale formerly demanded 
by the men. 

The International Transport Work- 
ers' Congress, which held its ses- 
sions at Caxton Hall, London, Eng- 
land, recently, was composed of dele- 
gates from England, France, Sweden. 
America, Germany, and Italy, and 
represented over a million workers. 
Herr O. Schumann presided. The 
chairman said that since the move- 
ment started their power had in- 
creased tremendously, and they now 
numbered in their ranks considerably 
over a million workers. Every day 
they were learning to appreciate 
more the importance of international 
solidarity. 

Throughout Spain a strike of mi- 
ners is threatened and the Prime 
Minister has declared that it is a 
revolutionary movement, promoted 
by three or four agitators, a bold 
statement considering the notoriously 
miserable conditions of the Rio Tinto 
and other miners. As a matter of 
fact, at a meeting in the North, as 
many as 1,729 miners have voted for 
the strike and only seventy-two 
against, and at another, 8,348 were in 
favor of a fight and only 182 against 
the strike. The present movement 
started among the 25,000 miners of 
the Huelva (Rio Tinto) district, and 
is being joined by 24,000 miners in 
Asturia, 14,000 in Vizcay, 10,000 in 
Murcia, and 7,000 in Santander. The 
miners demand a 25 per cent, increase 
in wages, and the introduction of the 
principle of the minimum wage. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... 8AN PEDRO 



M. BROWN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

-437 RROINT STREET SAIV PEDRO 



S. G. SWANSON 

^^l BEST '^H'tS^ TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to Postoffice, 
Los Angeles "Waterfront" 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED, 



Kasper Qlsen, a native of Fredrik- 
stad, Norway, age about 25, is in- 
quired for. Address Christ Hansen, 
Port Ludlow, Wash. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
retail stores are counterfeits. 



him. Loose labels in 



JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry deeming Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

W« Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Gal. 

Dealer.- In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and AJ! San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 

ALEX. KANE C. A. BRUCE 

WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

Don't forget the 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



This is to certify that on the 27th 
day of February, 1911, one Mathias 
Lagman, then nineteen years of age, 
was a seaman on board the S. S. 
"Paloma," Cuban flag; that when said 
vessel was lying at anchor in the 
Port of Cabarian, P. R., at about 8 
o'clock in the evening, Lagman, who 
had been working with other men at 
painting, was walking between decks 
in the dark, when he fell through 
hatch No. 4, which had been left un- 
covered. He was picked up in the 
hold and it was found that he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. This 
young man was subsequently taken 
to Russia, where his mother, who is 
very poor, is taking care of him. 

It is believed that the owners were 
negligent in failing to have the hatch 
covered, and in failing to have or 
furnish proper lighting for the 'tween 
decks at the point where Lagman 
fell. If these facts can be proven, 
some relief might be obtained for this 
unfortunate boy. 

The following are the men who 
signed on the articles with Lagman, 
and who had been working with said 
Lagman: 

C. Jones, C. J. Johnson, F. Johan, 
M. Lanhard, E. Randal, W. Paulson. 

Any seaman who will locate these 
men or send their addresses to the 
Legal Aid Society, No. 1 Broadway, 
New York City, will be doing a 
great favor to said sailor, and to 
S. B. Axtell, attorney-in-charge. 

For similar reasons we desire to 
communicate with the following men 
who were members of the crew of 
the "Lyman M. Law" in October, 
1911, when Edward S. Tennberg was 
severely injured on the trip between 
Boston and Norfolk: 

Adolph Dittmer, John Olson, Har- 
old Herman, Charles Newberg, James 
J. Kelly. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 
Light and ventilation perfect. 
Cool and pleasant at all seasons. 



CIGARS TOBACCO SOFT DRINKS 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address, 
Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco. 
Cal. 

Adolf Theining, a native of Van- 
nersborg, Sweden, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Walter Jorgesen Clang, born in 
.^aland Yetta, Ostro Yetta, is in- 
quired for by his uncle, John Clang. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June. 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Enoch Joseph Horsfold, 18 years 
old, native of New Zealand, please 
communicate with Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 



NOTICE. 

Any sailor or fireman having bag- 
gage stored with John Krehmke, 407 
13rumm St., will please call on Mrs. 
John Krehmke, 1209- Central Ave., 
Alameda. Baggage to be kept 60 
days from to-day, then sold to de- 
fray expenses. 

MRS. JOHN KREHMKE, 

1209 Central Ave. (Martin Station), 
Alameda. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, Edw. -1739Kroman, M. 

Anderson, Marius Kallas, M. 

Andersen, Monls Lang, C. 

Anderson, Gust Lindberg, Billy 

Anderson, W. -1630 Lewis, George 

.■Vndersen. A. -1645 Leideker, C. 

-Mien, August Lauritson, George 

Andersen, A. P. Lindeberg, Ernest 

.\.nnell, .\lbert Lenil<e. Riciiard 

Anderson, Ernst Lewet. Frenchie 

-Anderson, David Linderman. Gust 
Anderson. HemmindLindgren, Gust 

Anderson. Lewis Lister, W. 

.\nderson, Patrick Livingston, F. 

.\nderson, P. Loining, Herman 

Anderson, Sam Lutzen, W. 

.\nderson, Soren Mayer, W. 

Bringsund, Harald Makinen, Oskar 

Behrsin, Jacob Maatta, John 

Bergh, Borge Moulas, Nick 

Bengtsson, C. -1924 Merieult, Gaston 

Benson, lielge Mickelsson, A. -1105 

Berlins, Emil Miller, John 

Buchtman, F. Mohle, N. S. 

Blakstad, Ed. Nlchiols, Walter 

Cristensen, H. ..elsen, Julius 

-1366 Nelson, Ernest 

Casasio, Joe Nelson, Hans 

Carlsson, Aksel Olsen, Ferdinand 

-1220 Olsen, Oswald 

Chifpman, Wealie Olsen, W. 

CoUberg, C. Ogilvie, Wm. 

Doyle, "W. Olsen, Sckutar 

1 liscliler, Peter Owen, Fred 

Dougal, A. Olsen, Marius 

Davidson, W. Olsen, Olav 

Dreger, Jack Olsen, Nick 

Ekholra, F. Peknian. Ernest 

Eikart. T. G. Peterson, Oscar 
Eriksson, C. -333 (Reg. Letter) 

Farrell, Henry Persson, Hjalmar 

Flcbe, Fritz Repson, E. 

Falbom, Richard Rajala, Wictor 

Felsch. Charley Reshe, G. H. 

i'lanagan, J.iuk Sandblom, Konrad 

l^oriensen, Olaf Samuelson, Wivtor 

Ciantley, Mr. Sandstrom, O. II. 
i;utman. Jack -1810 

(.ironlund, Oskar Simpson, L. O. 

-414 Smith, William 

Holmstrom, Fritz Schroeder, Hans 

Hjorth, Knut Sanne, Rudolph 

liiiusman, Mr. Sanders, Swedrup 

Hansen, C. Sevardseh, E. 

Hansen. I'ete -1877 Sievers. G. P. 

llass, James Smith, H. D. -2015 

Halvorsen, O. Staar, Chas. -2601 

Hansen, Herald Sundquist, E. Au?. 

Hansen. Johannes Thogersen, Ped^r 

Hansen, Martin H. Thorsen, Joe 

Helonius. Oskar Torgersen. .Vnton 

Hintza, Yrjo Ulappa. Kosli 

Holtsman, Harry Warkala, J. 

Johansson, J. -2266 Wllemson, H. 

.lorgensen, Fred Willis, F. S. 

Jensen, Jens B. Wirtanen. Charles 

Johansson, Fritz W. Werner, Paul 

.lonasson, O. M. Wene, K. J. 

Johansen. Walter Zorning, Arthur 

Jensson. John -2203 Zoe, F. 
Johnson, Ben Packages and 

.Johnson, Fred Photos. 

.lolinson, Andrew Anderson, Hilding 

Kumlander, Emil Kroman, M. 

Kalnin. E. Larsen, Jaines Chr. 

Klahn, K. Nordman, John 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Albrect, Chas. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, M. C. 
Andowety, H. 
Anderson, E. 
Anderson, C. E. 
Anderson, E. K. 
.\nderson, A. 
Berthele, M. 
Baker, M. 
Bode, W. 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, A. 
Christenscn, A. 
Clausen, J. 
Colbert, M. J. 
Douglas, G. A. 
Edgeston, C. J. 
Ehlert, An. 
Eaton, Neva I. 
Glaaormither, C. 
Gordon, James 
Hansen, Pet. 
Haralsen, W. 
Hanson, Jorg. 
Hansen, Christ. 
Haven, Francis 
Hevaroso, H. B. 
Hapstad. Sigurd 
Irwin, Robert 
Ivans, Carl 
'i'rlke, Willie 
Jensen, Hans 



Karlson, Hans 
Karlsen, Oskar 
KJassgaard, Hans 
Langer, Robert 
Laymbrag, H. 
Lintianen, Ernest 
Lindberg, T. 
I>udwigsen, Arne 
Marx, Albert 
Machado, H. 
Mafo, E. S. 
Methenen, E. K. 
Olander, Carl 
Olsen. J. H. 
Person, Edmond 
Pitschkun, W. 
Pelusan, D. E. 
Russell, W. 
Relnlnk, H. 
Rasmundsen, G. 
Silhus, W. 
Slan, C. 
Schift, Ch. 
Sorensen, E. 
Suvert, H. 
Sjablom, G. 
Stenars, A. W. 
Salversen, S. 
Schates, A. 
Vilvot, J. 

Williamson, R. A. 
Zornow, Herbert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Albert Christensen, native of By- 
rum Laso, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco in 1910, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, H. C. Christensen, 
Scandinavian Sai'.ors' Home, San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



I 



In the thirty-second annual report of the 
Canadian Pacific Railroad, the shareholders are 
asked to approve the purchase of two steamships 
for the Pacific Coast service, 395 feet long, 54 
feet beam, capable of making llYz knots per 
hour at sea, and to cost approximately $1,000,- 
000 each, for the large and growing passenger 
business between Vancouver, Victoria and other 
ports on the Coast. 

The schooner "Santa Cruz," Captain Nidever, 
went on the rocks at Rincon, Cal., during the 
night of September 19 and pounded to pieces. 
Captain Nidever and his crew of three men es- 
caped through the surf. The "Santa Cruz," a 
small vessel owned by the Santa Cruz Island 
Company of San Francisco, was on its way from 
San Pedro to Santa Cruz island and lost her 
bearings in the fog. 

A shell from a three-inch gun, supposed to 
have been fired during target practice at Fort 
Worden was found imbedded in the masonry of 
an inside wall in the basement of the Port 
Townsend Lumber Company's building on the 
main street. The shell, which is supposed to 
have struck the water and been deflected from 
its course, tore a great hole in the v^'all, but 
did no serious damage. 

For failure to produce a bill of health from 
Victoria, B. C, and Santa Rosalia, Mexico, Cap- 
tain H. W. Dernier, master of the British bark 
"Cclticburn," was fined $5000 by the Customs 
office of the Puget Sound District. The "Celtic- 
burn" arrived in Port Townsend from Victoria 
August 31. Captain Dernier had applied for re- 
lief from the fine on the ground that he took 
charge of the vessel at Victoria, B. C, and 
knew nothing of the management of the vessel. 
Two libels demanding reinbursement for cargo 
damaged in transit on board the coastwise 
steamer "Rochelle" were filed in the United 
States District Court at San Francisco on Sep- 
tember 23. One of the libels, filed by Balfour, 
Guthrie & Co., contains four dififerent counts, 
totaling a claim of $1195. The second libel was 
filed by Allen & Lewis, whose claim is $2193. 
A libel was also filed against the schooner "C. A. 
Thayer" by H. C. Christensen, who claims $365 
as wages due him. 

It is announced a new steamship company 
is to establish a line of traffic between Panama 
and the Los Angeles harbor as soon as the 
Panama Canal is open. The company is said 
to have three vessels readv for service as soon 
as the canal is opened. F,ach of these vessels 
has a carrying capacity of 1500 tons dead weight 
and accommodations for 100 passengers. It pro- 
poses to ply between all coast ports from the 
canal to the Los Angeles harbor and develop 
trade possibilities now lying dormant. 

The Union oil tanker "Washtenaw" and the 
barge "Simla." which were ashore on Rodgers 
Ledge, near Point Gorda, arrived at San Fran- 
cisco on September 26. The "Washtenaw" got 
free without any assistance, but the "Simla" re- 
quired the aid of the steamer "Adeline Smith" 
before she cleared the rocks, on which she 
pounded for fourteen hours. The "Washtenaw" 
and the "Simla" went ashore in the fog at 10 
o'clock Wednesday morning. Both vessels will 
have to lay up for some time fcv repairs. 

The "Santa Cecilia," fourth of the new liners 
constructed at Cramps for the coast to coast 
service of W. R. Grace & Co.. was successfully 
launched a few davs ago. With the launching 
of the "Santa Cecilia" the onartet of handsome 
vessels is now afloat. The "Santa Cruz" has al- 
ready made two trips between here and the 
other coast, the "Santa Clara" is now en route 
on her maiden voyage from the Atlantic to the 
Golden Gate, and the "Santa Catalina" will leave 
the East side next month and will be followed 
by the "Santa Cecilia" in November. 

.According to latest reports the opening of the 
Panama Cannl will be carried out on schedule, 
on October 10. Bv that time the last barrier 
between the Atlantic and the Pacific will have 
been removed for the water to gush into the 
big ditch. Elaborate ceremonies have been out- 
lined for the great day. and no less a nersonaee 
than the President of the LTnited States wi'l 
be the chief figure at the historic event. Presi- 
dent Wilson is said to have arranged all the 
aflfairs of state so he can make a quick trip 
down to the canal and back. 

The new steamer under construction at the 
St. Helens Shinbuilding Company's vard for 
Charles R. McCormick & Co., San Francisco, 
which will be readv to launch in October, will 
be named the "Cclilo." She is to be a duplicate 
of the "Multnomah" and "Merced." each of 
which has capacity for handling 1,000.000 feet 
of lumber and accommodations for sixty cabin 
passengers. After launching she will be towed 
to San Francisco to have her machinery in- 
stalled, and is expected to be ready to go in 
regular service between San Francisco and Port- 
land before the end of the year. 



Having safely transferred her passengers at 
sea to another vessel, the steam-schooner "laqua," 
Captain Arthur Self, which struck on Saunders 
reef during the fog on September 25, was towed 
into San Francisco by the Redstack tug "Fearless" 
on September 26. The "Taqua" was aground for 
four hours and received damage to her stern 
post by pounding on the rocks. The vessel took 
to leaking badly aft, but Captain Self managed 
to get her off into deep water, where the pumps 
kept her free. The steam-schooner "Sea Foam" 
hove in sight on Thursday morning and the 
"laqua's" fourteen passengers were transferred 
to that vessel to continue their trip north. 

The four-masted schooner "Transit," which 
was crushed in the ice at Point Barrow, was 
worth probably $75,000, though Captain John B. 
Backhand, her owner and navigator, bought her 
for very much less several vears ago. Her cargo 
is estimated to have cost $25,000, including sup- 
plies for trading stations in the Arctic owned by 
Backland. When the "Transit" sailed for the 
North last May she carried coal and other sup- 
plies for the Government schools north of 
Nome, taken on Backland's own account, because 
the Sundry Civil bill had failed of passage by 
Congress and the schools would have been with- 
out fuel, there being no Government money to 
buv it for them. 

The most important step thus far toward the 
operation of the Panama Canal took place on 
September 26 when the sea-going tugboat 
"Gatun," drawing twelve and one-half feet of 
water, was passed successfully through the 
Gatun locks, and to-night floats on the bosom 
of Gatun lake. This was the first attempt made 
to operate the locks on the canal, and the result 
was highly pleasing to Colonel Goethals, chair- 
man of the Canal Commission, and canal officials 
generally. All day long himdreds of persons, 
men, women and children, withstood the burning 
rays of the tropic sun to see the act of passing 
the first vessel from sea level to the level of 
Gatun lake, which reached a height of a little 
over sixty-five feet, or within twenty feet of its 
normal level. 

It is reported from Honolulu that the Pacific 
Coast Steamship Company has been conducting 
negotiations which may le^d to the purchase 
from the Interisland Steam Navigation Company 
of the steamer Kilauea. The local concern, 
which has suffered several ship losses in the past 
few vears, the most recent one being the steam- 
er ".State of California." is said to be desirous of 
ohtainine the "Kilauea" for the coastwise service. 
The "Kilauea" is practically new, and was 
built at the Union Iron Works. She has accom- 
tnodations for over 100 passengers, and is said 
to be suitable for traffic on this Coast. On ac- 
count of a dull period in the islands, subsequent, 
it is said, on the sugar tariff discussion, the 
"Kilauea" as well as several other vessels of the 
Interisland fleet, have been laid up. 

By a "gentlemen's agreement" between Col- 
lector of Customs J. O. Davis on the one hand, 
and the employes of the Navy yard on Mare 
Island on the other, the latter may continue to 
be ferried to and from their work, between the 
Navy yard and Valleio, on the Pacific Motor 
Boat .'Association's launches. A complaint 
reached Captain John K. Bulger, LTnited States 
supervising inspector of hulls, to the efifect that 
the two launches Were constantly crowded be- 
yond the limits allowed by law. Captain Bulger 
investigated and it was found that the com- 
plaint was well founded. Then Collector Davis 
visited the Navy yard, together with Captain 
Bulger, and made a "gentlemen's agreement" 
with the employes to the effect that only 150 
men shall cross the channel on either of the 
launches at one time. 

Wholesale desertions from the United States 
gunboat "Yorktown," Captain G. B. Bradshaw, be- 
came known upon the warship's arrival at San 
Francisco on September 26 from long service on 
the West Coast of Mexico and Central America. 
In all, thirty-eight men are said to have "jumped 
ship" at various ports. According to the gossip 
of the crew, the desertions were the result of 
long-sustained stops at lower coast ports, during 
which the men were denied shore liberty. With 
the arrival of the Yorktown at San Pedro, after 
over five months' sojourn in Mexican and Cen- 
tral American waters, during which there was 
little opportunity for the jackies to stretch their 
sea legs ashore, thirteen men failed to return to 
the ship. There were also a large number of de- 
sertions at Panama and Corinto, Nicaragua, 
where the men chafed under the standard of 
discipline set by Captain Bradshaw. For three 
months the "Yorktown" lay at Corinto, and but 
little shore liberty was accorded the men. this 
precaution being taken to prevent the possibility 
of a disturbance ashore. 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claim<; 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Telephone, Kearnv 394; 
^ (Advt.) 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Branches: 
NEW YORK CITY, 40 South St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 1054 Magazine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. Telephone 1879 

Broad. • Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO. III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. T.. 65 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND. O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. T., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 M^oodbrldge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y,. 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO. N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O,, 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 East Woodbrldge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N, Y., 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal,, 84 Embarcadero. 

Branches: 
VICTORIA, B. C, Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER, B, C, Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmuir, P. O. Box 13G5. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash.. 2218 North 30th St. 

SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 51 Union Ave.. Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cnl., 227 First St.. P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 91 Stcuart St. 
Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash.. 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
S75. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cat., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months . - - 1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be In by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To Insure a prompt reply correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofllce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
84 Embarcadero, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral Interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 1913. 



A LIE NAILED! 



"Labor" and "Labor leaders" are frequently 
charged with crimes of which they are as 
innocent as a new-born baby. It is impossi- 
ble, therefore, to reply to all the lies of that 
nature which appear in print. However, the 
Sunnyvale Standard, of Sunnyvale, Cal., in 
its issue of September 19 publishes a more 
brazen and malicious lie than has appeared 
in print for some time past, and it seems to 
be necessary to waste some valuable space to 
take that libelous sheet to task. 

Here is a part of the Standard's editorial 

calumny : 

The startling announcement was made re- 
cently that the State Federation of Labor had 
endorsed the action of certain large business in- 
terests in filing affidavits in Washington to the 
effect that Hindoo immigrants were unobjection- 
able in California, and that the bars should be 
let down and the dusky hordes of the Orient 
given free admission. We are not surprised at 
certain moneyed interests wanting Hindoo labor 
or any other labor that is cheap and servile; for 
capital is absolutely indifferent to patriotism, to 
love of race or to Christian civilization or to 
anything else but money making. But what sur- 
prises us is that the Labor Councils of the State 
should endorse the incoming of a horde of 
Asiatic coolies whose presence will not only be 
a menace to .American homes, but to every vital 
interest of white labor. We can only suppose 
that money has purchased the ac(iuiescence of 
certain labor leaders, who are out for their own 
pockets, not for the toilers whom they are sup- 
posed to represent. If the black hordes of India 
do gain admittance to this State through the 
falling down of the labor leaders before the 
money god, vvc predict that when the white la- 
borers themselves realize their predicament there 
will be some tar and feathers and ropes pro- 
vided for the traitors. 

So much for the alleged "traitors." The 
facts in the case are as follows: 

A few weeks ago a telegram was received 
by the California State Federation of Labor 
from a prominent trade-union official at 
Washington stating that "Big Business" of 
the Pacific Coast had filed affidavits in Wash- 
ington certifying to the desirability of Hin- 
doos and that the latter were unobjectionable 
to Californians, etc. Promptly upon receipt 
of this information a night lettergram was 
sent to the various Central Labor Councils 
of the State urging them to immediately 
adopt resolutions protesting against the ad- 
mission of Hindoos and secure affidavits from 
employers and business men generally in con- 



tradiction of the affidavits on file in Wash- 
ington. The request of the State Federation 
met with immediate response. Ringing reso- 
lutions protesting against the misrepresenta- 
tions of "Big Business" have been adopted 
throughout the State and copies forwarded 
to the Commissioner-General of Immigration 
at Washington. At the instance of Labor, 
numerous affidavits in rebuttal from fair- 
minded employers have also been filed in 
Washington, and as a whole there can be 
little or no doubt about the unanimity of 
Labor upon the subject of Hindoo immigra- 
tion. All of this can be easily verified by 
the records. 

Hence, it is evident that some one has 
iianded the Sunnyvale editor a story which 
he ought to have investigated before writing 
his utterly ridiculous and unwarranted tirade 
again.st "Labor leaders." 



BETTER FORECASTLES. 



Continued agitation for improved fore- 
castles has finally brought results in at 
least one country's vessels. 

Revised instructions regarding the survey 
of masters' and crew spaces have just been 
issued by the British Board of Trade. They 
will not come into force until February 1, 
1914, but in the meantime special attention 
is directed to the undermentioned para- 
graphs, wherein important alterations are 
embodied : 

5. Inspection by surveyors. 
11 and 15. Prohibition of working gear, hawse 
holes, cables and chain lockers in crew spaces. 

14. Dividing bulkheads of lamp-room, or paint 
or oil store-room to be of iron or steel. 

15. Crews' living quarters to be in houses 
or poops rather than in lower forecastles. 

16. Electric lighting recommended. 

17. Position and size of overhead ventilators. 
Mechanical ventilation plans to be submitted. 

18. Cork cementing of bare iron surfaces in 
new ships. 

18 and 22. Access to bunks, deep bunk boards, 
iron bunks. 

21. Crew spaces to be cut off from coffer 
dams, oil fuel, and pump spaces. 

23 (new). Heating arrangements in crew 
spaces. 

24. Water-closets, seating, soil pipes and 
valves, flushing arrangements, ventilation, dividing 
bulkheads to be iron or steel, self-cleansing pans, 
etc. 

25. Mess table and seats, provision lockers, 
and space for oilskins, etc. 

26 (new). Provision of hospitals for crew. 
31. General regulations as to cleansing. 
33. Submission of builders' drawings at an 
early stage in the construction. 

Among the many good points in the new 
regulations the prohibition of working gear, 
hawse holes, cables and chain lockers in the 
crew's quarters is particularly commend- 
able. 

That the issuance of these revised in- 
structions is in a great measure due to the 
influence of the rapidly-growing National 
Sailors' and Firemen's Union of Great 
Britain and Ireland need hardly be told. 
That the new regulations regarding fore- 
castles should be made public at this time 
is gratifying because Great Britain is the 
leading maritime nation and it will ill be- 
come American shipowners to further pro- 
test against those features of the Seamen's 
bill which aim to provide more space for 
the crew's quarters on American ships. The 
competition bugaboo has been w-orked to 
perfection by the American shipowmer in 
frightening timid legislators. However, 
now that America's principal competitor 
on the seas has taken the lead in making 
the seamen's life a little more attractive 
it is to be hoped that Congress will here- 
after disregard the selfish pleas of certain 
interests and enact the one measure which 
will improve the lot of American seamen. 



THE COASTWISE TRADE. 



Diligent inquiry shows that there is no 
available report giving a detailed or in any 
way satisfactory statement of the coastwise 
trade of America. It is generally known, 
however, that the figures have risen to vast 
proportions, far outreaching all totals of for- 
eign trade, and standing as perhaps the most 
monumental fact in water transportation. 

The opening of the Panama Canal will 
make trade between Pacific Coast ports and 
points on the United States Atlantic sea- 
board as much coastwise trade as it is be- 
tween Boston and New York or San Fran- 
cisco and Seattle, and it is bound to be enor- 
mous. The East buys millions of dollars' 
worth of citrus fruits of California. All this 
may come by water at much less than the 
present railroad rate. But that is not all. 
A recent dispatch from Los Angeles, for in- 
-stance, states that 3250 carloads of celery, 
cauliflower, cabbage, lettuce and tomatoes are 
being raised this year for Eastern markets, 
an increase of 1083 carloads over last year. 
When the Canal is open all this food may 
be profitably brought to Atlantic ports in re- 
frigerated ships for a great deal less than 
the present railway rates. 

On the Western side of the continent is 
an increasing production for the East. In 
the East all shipyards seem to be crowded, 
turning out new ships, and the announcement 
has just been made that the Hamburg-Amer- 
ican line is asking for bids for three large 
passenger ships to ply between Atlantic and 
Pacific ports through the Canal — a move 
which means the invasion of the American 
coastwise trade by one of the largest for- 
eign corporations. This particular event has 
an obvious and deeply significant meaning for 
the men who earn their livelihood on Amer- 
ican ships and should bring them to a reali- 
zation of the necessity of meeting new con- 
ditions. 

Otherwise the activities of foreign ship- 
ping companies in this respect are not sur- 
prising. The American coastwise trade leads 
the world and it is just on the edge of mar- 
velous possibilities; hence the largest steam- 
ship line in the world wants to get into it, 
even though it has to slip in under American 
laws. And if the American law is not what 
it ought to be, it should be amended prompt- 
ly and effectively. 

Another — perhaps even more far-reaching 
— result of the opening of the Canal is the 
turning of a great tide of immigration from 
Southern Europe to the Pacific Coast. These 
newcomers will add to the production of 
fruits and vegetables, and thus in a few 
years the Eastern markets will be getting 
much of their food from the Pacific Coast, 
and in that manner greatly increase shipping 
via the Panama Canal. 

It is the human aspect of this great ques- 
tion with which we are most concerned. 
Will the opening of the Canal lower the 
economic condition of the workers already 
on the Pacific Slope, or will we be able to 
hold our own and march onward uninter- 
ruptedly? This is a question of tremendous 
importance and consequence to the working 
class of the West, and it should be met and 
discussed with greater interest than has here- 
tofore been exhibited! 



Organized labor too often commits the 
common error of neglecting its friends in 
order the more sedulously to cultivate its 
enemies. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



The H. M. S. "New Zealand" passed through 
Vancouver Narrows recently on a Sunday after- 
noon and received a most enthusiastic reception 
from the multitudes crowded on the shores in 
Stanley Park. The weather was at its best and 
the inspiring strains from the bands both on 
ship and shore lent great animation and efifect 
to the scene. One would have thought that all 
Vancouver had left the city and gone out to 
the headlands to catch the first glimpse of the 
incoming warship with her setting of accom- 
panying steamers. A sight of the crowd, how- 
ever, that had gathered in the vicinity of Coal 
Harbor, where the vessel shortly afterwards 
dropped anchor, would have corrected this im- 
pression. — Press item. 

The people of Au.stralasia and British Co- 
lumbia have many things in common. Not 
the least of the ties that bind them is their 
mutual desire — or rather determination — to 
keep both nations free from yellow invasion 
and preserve their respective countries as a 
heritage to the white race of the future. 
And the unusually enthusiastic reception ac- 
corded to the H. M. S. "New Zealand" was 
probably inspired to a great degree by that 
common danger and the silent but deep aver- 
sion toward the unwelcome intruder of the 
Orient. 



New York, September 20. — When the Im- 
perator sailed to-day for Cherbourg, on her 
fourth return voyage across the Atlantic, one of 
the $5000 suites de luxe was occupied by I. W. 
Hellman Jr., a San Francisco banker, who is 
going to Paris for his first vacation in fourteen 
years. The $5000 suite has twelve rooms, in- 
cluding an exercise runway for pet dogs. — ■ 
Press item. 

Brother Hellman is to be pitied. Only 
one vacation in fourteen years and then to 
be compelled to put up in a measly $5000 
suit of only twelve rooms. Fortunately, how- 
ever, his pet dogs will be able to exercise in 
their private runway, and thus the monotony 
of a dreary journey across the Atlantic will 
be greatly relieved. It must be particularly 
gratifying to the overworked and underpaid 
non-union employes of the privately owned 
San Francisco street-car lines that Mr. Hell- 
man should be so kind and considerate to 
his dogs. No doubt they will hereafter make 
special efforts to load up the cars and gather 
in the nickels with even greater zeal than 
heretofore. Mr. Hellman needs the money — 
for his dogs ! 



It was learned recently that second officers 
on the Canadian Pacific Railway steamers on 
the British Columbia coast are paid $70 per 
month, while the Chinese head cook receives 
$75. A communication was then addressed 
by a certain mutual adtniration society known 
as the "Imperial Merchant Service Guild," 
to the C. P. R., respectfully urging a slight 
raise for the white officers. So far as we 
have been able to learn there has been no 
response from the company. Still, some of 
the British authorities can not understand 
why there is a scarcity of naval reserve 
officers in the merchant marine. Can you 
beat it? 



To say that the creator is greater than 
the created is well enough as a general- 
ization, but we should be careful not to 
use that saying in justification of condi- 
tions the tendencies of which are in their 
nature uncontrollable. For instance, we 
should not say that the creator of a fire 
in a powder magazine is greater than the 
thing actually created, i. e., the explosion 
that follows as a natural sequence. So, in 
industrial afifairs a body of free and intel- 
ligent men may easily enough create a 
condition of afifairs that will inevitably 
reduce them to a state of helplessness. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



COMMENT ON SEAMEN'S BILL. 



The following boost for the Seamen's 
bill appeared in a recent issue of the Port- 
land Labor Press: 

The passage of Senate Bill No. 4, called 
the Seamen's bill, during the present ses- 
sion of Congress, is hopefully expected by 
the seamen, by their friends and that part 
of the people who occasionally use ships to 
travel on. The bill provides for the repeal 
of sections of the old law which subject 
American seamen to involuntary servitude. 
The bill further aims at more safety at sea 
for crews and passengers by providing that 
ships, according to their size, must carry a 
certain number of seamen and that these 
seamen must be able to prove that they 
have the qualifications of seamen. This 
bill will also tend to equalize the running 
cost between American and foreign ves- 
sels trading to American ports. According 
to international maritime law these foreign 
vessels come under the regulations of this 
bill. 

Appeals to Senators and Congressmen 
to support this bill have brought forth en- 
couraging replies. 

The following letter was received from 
Senator Chamberlain, a member of the 
Committee on Commerce, which has the 
bill in charge: 

"United States Senate, Washington, D. 
C, September 11, 1913. 

"E. H. Crandall, Secretary, Portland, 
Oregon. 

"My Dear Sir — I beg to acknowledge 
the receipt of your favor of the 6th 
instant, advising me that the Central Labor 
Council of Portland is in favor of Senate 
Bill No. 4, to promote the welfare of 
American seamen, etc. In reply permit me 
to say that I am in favor of this measure 
and am co-operating with the President of 
the Seamen's Union in an endeavor to get 
it reported out of the committee. You 
may rest assured that I will do all I can 
in this behalf. I have the honor to 
remain, 

"Yours very respectfully, 

"G.Eo. E. Ch.\mberl.\in." 



It is reported that Sherman Allen, As- 
sistant Secretary of the Treasury, has made 
a demand on Joseph York, master of the 
wrecked schooner "George \V. Wells," 
either to prove or withdraw his charges 
against the life-savers of the Ocracoke and 
Portsmouth stations, on the Carolina coast. 
During a 100-mile gale, September 3, the 
life-savers rescued twenty-two persons, in- 
cluding two women and two children, from 
the schooner. After exhausting themselves 
in an attempt to launch lifeboats the life- 
savers waded into water up to their necks 
to shoot a line to the schooner. Captain 
York says he and his crew were forced to 
sleep in wet clothing after the rescue and 
that the life-savers have formed a combina- 
tion to buy all wrecked vessels, thereby 
forcing him to accept $800 for the wreck. 



A disposition on the part of a trade union 
to talk with its employers is no sign of its 
inability to adopt other means of securing 
justice if need be. And, per contra, the 
trade union that denies or ignores the wis- 
dom of conferring whenever possible gen- 
erally displays little stomach for sterner 
methods when forced to meet them. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 29, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. .Secretary re- 
ported shipping slack, lots of men around. 
Shipwreck Benefit was awarded to an additional 
member of the crew of the steamer "State of 
California." A Quarterly Finance Committee 
was elected to examine the Union's accounts for 
the past three months. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

84 Embarcadero. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping slack; few men around. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
N. E. corner of Hastings and Main streets. 
P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
No meeting; no quorum. Prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel, Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping slack. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping dull; prospects better. 

JOHN ANDERSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
l28'/2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. IS, 1913. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull. 

JACK EDWARDSEN, Agent, 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Head(|uarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 25, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slack, plenty of men ashore. 
.\ Quarterly Finance Committee was elected. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 18, 1913. 
No meeting. Shippin.g slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203-205. Phone 
Main 2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 18, 1913. 
No meeting. Shipping dull; few men ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 18, 1913. 
No meeting. Prospects medium. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
New Grand Central Hotel, Room 108, Third 
and Flanders Streets. Phone Main 1528. 



DIED. 

John McLoughlin, No. 93, a native of Ireland, 
age 45, died at Honolulu, H. T., Sept. 11. 1913. 

Samuel Peterson, No. 1469, a native of New 
Jersey, age 23, died on board the steamer "Mari- 
posa." Sept. 18, 1913. 

Johan Anton Taddiken, No. 593, a native of 
Germany, age 33, was drowned from the 
schooner "City of Papeete," Sept. 24, 1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



A. F. OF L. CONVENTION CALL. 



Headquarters, 801-809 G Street N. W., 
Washington, D. C, Sept. 10, 1913. 
To All Affiliated Unions, Greeting: 

You are hereby notified that, in pursuance 
to the Constitution of the American Federa- 
tion of Labor, the Thirty-third Annual Con- 
vention of the American Federation of La- 
bor will be held in Seattle, Wash., at Eagles 
Hall (or at another hall which the Executive 
Council may later select), beginning ten 
o'clock Monday morning, November 10, 1913, 
and will continue in session from day to day 
until the business of the Convention has been 
completed. 

Representation. 

Representation in the Convention will be 
on the following basis: From National or 
International Unions, for less than 4,000 
members, one delegate; 4,000 or more, two 
delegates; 8,000 or more, three delegates; 
16,000 or more, four delegates; 32,000 or 
more, five delegates ; 64,000 or more, six del- 
egates; 128,000 or more, seven delegates, 
and so on ; and from Central Bodies and 
State Federations, and from local trade 
unions not having a National or Interna- 
tional Union, and from Federal Labor 
LTnions, one delegate. 

Organizations to be entitled to repre- 
sentation must have obtained a certificate 
of affiliation (charter) at least one month 
prior to the Convention ; and no person will 
be recognized as a delegate who is not a 
member in good standing of the organiza- 
tion he is elected to represent. 

Only bona fide wage-workers, who are 
not members of, or eligible to membership 
in other trade unions, are eligible as dele- 
gates from Federal Labor Unions. 

Delegates must be selected at least two 
weeks previous to the Convention, and their 
names forwarded to the Secretary of the 
American Federation of Labor immediately 
after their election. 

Delegates are not entitled to seats in the 
Convention unless the tax of their organiza- 
tions has been paid in full to September 
30, 1913. 

It is, of course, entirely unnecessary here 
to enumerate the imminent important sub- 
jects with which our forthcoming Conven- 
tion will concern itself, but the reminder is 
not at all amiss that every eflfort must be 
made to broaden the field and means for 
the organization of the yet unorganized 
w'orkers, to strive to bring about, more ef- 
fectually than ever, a better day in the 
lives and homes of the toilers, to defend 
and maintain by every honorable means in 
our power the right to organize for our 
common defense and advancement, for the 
exercise of our normal and constitutional 
activities to protect and promote the rights 
and interests of the workers ; and to assert 
at any risk the freedom of speech and of 
the press and the equal rights before the 
law of every worker with every other citi- 
zen. These and other great questions of 
equal importance will, of necessity, occupy 
the attention of the Seattle Convention. 

Therefore the importance of our move- 
ment, the duty of the hour and for the fu- 
ture, demand that every organization en- 
titled to representation shall send its full 
quota of delegates to the Seattle Conven- 
tion, November 10, 1913. 

Do not allow favoritism to influence you 



in selecting your delegates. Be fully rep- 
resented. 

Be represented by your ablest, best, most 
experienced, and faithful members. 
Credentials. 

Credentials in duplicate are forwarded to 
all affiliated unions. The original creden- 
tials must be given to the delegate-elect and 
the duplicate forwarded to the American 
Federation of Labor office, 801-809 G street 
Northwest, Washington, D. C. 

The Committee on Credentials will meet 
at the headquarters of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor si.x days previous to the 
opening of the Convention, and will report 
immediately upon the opening thereof at 
Seattle; hence secretaries will observe the 
necessity of mailing the duplicate creden- 
tials of their respective delegates at the 
earliest possible moment to Washington, 
D. C. 

Grievances. 

Under the law no grievance can be con- 
sidered by the Convention which has been 
decided by a previous Convention, except 
upon the recommendation of the Executive 
Council, nor will any grievance be con- 
sidered where the parties thereto have not 
themselves previously held conference and 
attempted to adjust the same. 

EXECUTIVE COUNCIL AMERIC.\N 
Fraternally, 
FEDER./^TION OF LABOR, 

Sam'l Gompers, President. 
Frank Morrison, Secretary. 



A HISTORIC MURDER AFLOAT. 



One of the most interesting murder cases 
ever recorded afloat has been given its final 
stage by the release from prison of the 
man sentenced for the crime and about 
whose guilt there was always some doubt. 
The case will be well remembered by all 
shipping men as that of the Boston bar- 
kentine "Herbert Fuller," which was also 
well-known in New York. The question 
at all the trials was as to whether the man 
at the wheel of the vessel could not have 
committed the murders in the cabin and 
returned to the wheel without being 
noticed, it being a fine calm night in June. 
This might have been made out if Bram, 
the second mate, had admitted that he w'as 
asleep on his watch on deck and did not 
hear the occurrence, but Bram never made 
such a claim and no charge against the 
man at the wheel (Brown), who had rather 
a bad character record, was made out. 
The case is sketched in the following dis- 
patch : 

Atlanta, Aug. 27. — Faultless behavior for 
7 years in the Federal Prison, during which 
he has been a great force for good, ac- 
cording to Warden Moyer, has convinced 
the Government authorities that Thomas 
M. C. Bram, convicted of a triple murder 
on the high seas, is an innocent man, and 
as a result he was set free to-day on the 
parole system. The Government acted 
under the new law which extends the 
terms of parole to life men. He was tried 
in the United States District Court in 
Boston twice, and both times was found 
guilty and was sent to the Massachusetts 
State Prison, where he was kept for eight 
years and five months. In 1906 he was 
sent to Atlanta. Friends have enlisted 
themselves in Bram's behalf and a few 
days ago his application for parole was 
favorably acted upon. Everybody liked 



him and the warden was glad to aid in 
getting him his freedom. 

"Brown accused me falsely," said Bram 
solemnly to-day. "I do not know who 
committed the crime. But I hope to know 
some day. I know only that I did not do 
it. The aim of my life is to find the guilty 
man. I would be willing to suffer his own 
punishment for him in order to clear my 
name. The first thing I am going to buy 
is a bunch of flowers, and I'm going to 
send them to Warden Moyer. He has been 
kind to me. Then I am going to get me a 
room and go into it by myself and have a 
good cry. I've got to have that cry before 
I can realize it's true. Then I'll want to 
pray a little. And after that I want work." 

Bram was charged with the murder of 
Capt. Charles I. Nash, his wife, Laura A. 
Nash, and the first mate of the barkentine 
"Herbert Fuller" in mid-ocean, when on a 
voyage to South America in 1896. The 
bodies were found in different compart- 
ments on the vessel, hacked to pieces, and 
were taken into Halifax, where Bram and 
others of the crew were placed under ar- 
rest. A Boston passenger, Lester H. 
Monks, was likewise aboard the vessel. 
The testimony at the trials was to the 
effect that after the killing of the three 
persons was discovered. Monks and Bram, 
who was second mate, kept a watch on one 
of the sailors, Charles Brown, or as he was 
also known, Julius Westerberg, believing 
his actions peculiar, and waited with drawn 
revolvers on the deck until daylight, lest 
they should be attacked by him or other 
sailors. Brown, on the other hand, de- 
clared that while standing at the wheel in 
the stern of the vessel, he was able to look 
through the window into the captain's 
cabin, and said that he had seen Bram kill 
Captain Nash. On the first trial of Bram 
the case went to the jury on January 1, 
1897, after a trial of some weeks, and a 
verdict of guilty of murder in the first de- 
gree was reached. Bram was sentenced 
March 9 to be hanged June 17. A new trial 
was granted, and in the interval a new 
Federal statute had been passed, which en- 
abled a jury in a United States court in a 
capital case to find a new form of verdict, 
"Guilty, but without capital punishment." 
This was the verdict which the second jury 
found against Bram in 1898. Bram was 
confined in the State Prison at Charlestown 
from the date of his conviction until No- 
vember 26, 1906, when he was removed to 
the Federal Prison at Atlanta, Ga. It is un- 
derstood a clerk in the Department of Jus- 
tice at Washington, who had considerable 
opportunity for observing Bram while at 
Atlanta, was favorably impressed by his 
conduct and actions, and that District At- 
torney French made a favorable report to 
the Department of Justice on the petition 
for a pardon. 



There are said to be more deaths than 
births in Prussia, and the only augmenta- 
tion of the population is by illiterates from 
the Near East. France has just voted large 
grants to parents who have more than two 
children, and it is considered likely that 
other states suffering from the loss of 
native population may do likewise. 



The most valuable lessons that trade 
unionism can learn are the lessons of 
patience and mobility — the lesson of how 
to wait for victory and the lesson of how 
to change a position in a fight. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



OVERTIME FOR SEAMEN. 



An interesting award relating to over- 
time pay for seamen was handed down re- 
cently by the New Zealand Supreme Court. 
Following are the facts in the case, copied 
from the records : 

McTighe vs. The Northern Steamship 
Company (Limited). 

In the Supreme Court, Auckland. — Be- 
fore Sim, J.— 21st and 29th April, 1913.— 
A. E. Skelton for appellant; McGregor for 
respondent. 

Agreement — Construction of — Overtime — Eight- 
hour Day — Sea Watches to count as part of 
Eight Hours — Sea Watch kept after Cargo 
worked. 

An agreement between a seaman's union and 
certain shipowners contained the following clause 
dealing with the hours of labor in port: "Deck 
hand.s — The hours of labor of deck hands in all 
ports, bays and roadsteads shall be eight, be- 
tween the hours of 7 a. m. and 5 p. m. Sea 
watches on days of arrival and departure shall 
count as portion of the eight hours, except when 
the ship arrives and leaves the same port on the 
same day, when the eight hours of deck hands 
may be worked at any time during the twenty- 
four hours; sea watches to count as portion of 
the eight hours." The overtime rate for work- 
ing cargo was fixed at Is. 6d. per hour, and for 
other classes of work Is. 3d. per hour, and a 
day for the purposes of the agreement meant 
from 12 midnight to 12 midnight. 

Held, That, except when a ship arrived and 
left the same port on the same day, in deciding 
whether a deck hand was entitled to Is. 6d. per 
hour or Is. 3d. per hour for overtime worked, 
the time worked in sea watches on any particu- 
lar day in which there was work in port must 
be counted as part of the eight hours whether 
the sea watches were kept before or after the 
cargo was worked. 

This is an appeal from a decision of the 
Magistrates' Court at Auckland. 

The appellant was employed as a seaman 
on the respondent company's steamer the 
"Kanieri." He worked overtime on certain 
days, and the question to be determined is 
whether he is entitled to be paid for this 
at the rate of Is. 3d. or Is. 6d. per hour. 
The answer to that question depends on the 
proper construction of clause 12 (a) of an 
agreement made between the Federated 
Seamen's Union of Australasia and cer- 
tain shipowners, including the respondent. 
That clause is as follows : 

"12. Hours of Labor in Port. 
"(a) Deck hands: The hours of labor of deck 
hands in all ports, bays, and roadsteads shall be 
eight, between the hours of 7 a. m. and 5 p. m. 
Sea watches on days of arrival and departure 
shall count as portion of the eight hours, except 
when the ship arrives and leaves the same port 
on the same day, when the eight hours of deck 
hands may be worked any time during the twen- 
ty-four hours; sea watches to count as portion 
of the eight hours." 

By clause 3 of the agreement the over- 
time rate for working cargo is fixed at Is. 
6d. per hour, and for other classes of work 
Is. 3d. per hour. The appellant was paid 
at the lower rate for the overtime in ques- 
tion. He claims that he ought to have been 
paid at the higher rate, and the present 
action was brought to recover the dififer- 
ence — namely, 3s. 

The view taken of the question by the 
Magistrate (Mr. Kettle) was that, under 
the agreement, a worker's time runs on con- 
tinuously until he has worked the required 
eight hours, and if any work is done by him 
after the expiry of the eight hours that 
work must be paid for as overtime under 
clause 3 according to the kind of work ac- 
tually done. According to this construction 
the plaintiff has been paid all that he was 
entitled to receive for overtime, and judg- 
ment accordingly was given for the re- 
spondent. 

The difficulty in the way of accepting 
this construction of the agreement is that 
it does not give full effect to the language 
of clause 12 (a). That clause fixes the 



hours of work of deck hands in ports, bays, 
and roadsteads at eight per day. When the 
ship arrives at and leaves the same port on 
the same day these hours may be worked 
at any time during the twenty-four hours. 
On other occasions the eight hours are to 
be worked between 7 a. m. and 5 p. m. The 
clause provides explicitly that sea watches 
on days of arrival and departure shall count 
as portion of the eight hours — that is to 
say, as part of the time which a seaman 
may be required to wor-k in port before be- 
ing entitled to be paid overtime. A day for 
the purposes of the agreement means from 
12 midnight to 12 midnight (clause 30). It 
seems to me that the only way in which 
full efifect can be given to the provision in 
clause 12 (a) is by taking all the time 
worked in sea watches on any particular 
day in which there has been work in port, 
and counting that as part of the eight 
hours, without regard to the particular 
hours when these watches were kept or to 
the question of how they stand in relation 
to the work in port on that day. It was 
admitted that sea watches kept on any day 
before any cargo had been worked must be 
treated as part of the eight hours. The 
agreement does not make any distinction 
between such watches and watches kept 
after cargo had been worked, and there is 
nothing in the language used to justify 
these two kinds of watches being treated 
differently for the purposes of clause 12 (a). 
They both must be treated, I think, in the 
same way for the purposes of that clause. 
That is the effect of the language used by 
the parties, and it is not unreasonable to 
conclude that it correctly expresses the real 
intention of the parties. The primary duty 
of a seaman is in connection with the navi- 
gation of the ship. If on any particular day 
he has to work in connection with both the 
navigation of the ship and the handling of 
cargo, the parties may be supposed to have 
intended that the first-mentioned work 
should be counted first for the purposes of 
the day's work, although in fact the sea 
watches did not come first in point of time. 
I think, therefore, that the appellant's 
claim is well founded. The appeal is al- 
lowed, and judgment entered for the ap- 
pellant for 3s., with costs in the Magis- 
trates' Court to be fixed by the Magistrate. 
The appellant is allowed £5 5s. for the 
costs of the appeal. As the question is 
an important one, the respondent may have 
leave to appeal to the Court of Appeal if 
it desires to do so. 



By taking the case to the highest British 
court, the Privy Council, the Canadian Pa- 
cific Railway has won its case against the 
owners of the Norwegian steamer "Kron- 
prins Olav" on account of the collision 
with the liner "Montcalm" in September, 
1910. The C. P. R. have had another ex- 
perience of much the same character. 
When the "Empress of Britain" rammed 
and sank the "Helvetia," it was confidently 
asserted that the former was to blame, and 
that she would have to pay for the loss of 
the "Helvetia," as well as her own damage. 
It was even reported that the C. P. R. had 
agreed to pay £60,000. When the case 
came -up for trial in England, both vessels 
were found to blame, but the proportions 
were five-twelfths against the "Empress of 
Britain" and seven-twelfths against the 
"Helvetia," so that the C. P. R. had the 
best of the action. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

V. A, OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELlAND, O 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbridge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y .70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 JefTerson Ave, E^ast 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. T 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenu* 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

BUFFALO. N. Y., 65 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295 

BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbridge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH fT^ICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
HjUghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault St. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



SEA LAWS OF THE 17TH CENTURY. 



There is a code of rules called Sea Lawis 
belonging to the sixteenth century, and 
another drawn up by the convention of the 
burghs in 1602, to "mak ane substantiell 
forme and ordour for niayntening and ad- 
vancing the tredd and handling be sey 
amang thame that hes to do thairwith," 
which gives a good deal of information on 
various matters connected with shipping, 
especially as regards the relations between 
skipper and mariner. Minute regulations 
were made as to the sailors' w-ages, to rem- 
edy the abuse of mariners "craweing and 
desyring of wadgeis at their awin plessour." 
They were to receive "scottis half hyreis" 
at the beginning of a voyage, and another 
instalment of pay when they reached the 
port for which they were bound. Then 
they were to serve homeward or to another 
port as the skipper decided, and were for- 
bidden to leave the ship for any "occasioun 
that may occur betwixt him and his mais- 
ter, or . . . betwixt him and his collegis, 
or any other excuis that may be alegeit." 
Nor were they to refuse to join the ship if 
the skipper thought the wind good. If they 
did he could hire another in the sailor's place, 
and the latter had to give up what he had 
received and pay a fine of ten marks. Also, 
if any mariner became stubborn and disobe- 
dient on the sea he was to be put on land 
and another hired. Provision was made for 
procedure in case any on shipboard tried 
for some reason to delay the voyage or make 
the master return sooner than he intended. 
The means they took were varied, and in- 
cluded letting the ship's drink, wine or beer, 
nm out and spill ; making warlocks secretly 
in the ship; and raising discord again.st the 
captain "givand him evill and unhonest words 
drawand thare wapins compelland him to 
submit him to thare simple will wch is a 
thing of most evill example and pernicious 
consequence and sould nawayis be sufiferit." 
Such offences were to be judged by the cap- 
tain with the advice of others on the ship. 
Those who made leagues or bands against the 
skipper or the steersman were also to be 
punished, and the .sailors were not to control 
the master in choosing his company or in 
going where he pleased. 

The personal relations of the ma.ster and 
his crew were not unnoticed. If the master 
gave any of them one "buffet with is neif 
or palme" he was to "suffer and byde" it, 
but if he struck him again the stricken one 
might return the blow. But if any ship- 
man dared to strike his master first the 
penalty was the loss of a hundred shillings or 
of his "neif," at the master's will. 

Apparently the catering was not always of 
the best, but no mariner was to "dispyse, con- 
teme, or lichtle the schipis wittuallis, nor zit 
desyre or crawe ony other intertenement 
within the schip bot sic as hes bene com- 
moune vsit of auld." Salt meat must have 
been wearisome diet, but no sailor was to 
press the skipper to buy fresh flesh or fish 
against his will when they came to a harbour. 
Meals at unwonted times were not approved 
of, and anyone who compelled the cook to 
prepare such was fined ten marks, but the 
cook, if he connived at this habit and kept 
the fault secret, had to pay five pounds. 
"Superfluous" drinking and making banquets 
were offences which were also punished by 
a ten mark fine. 

According to one writer the Scots ma- 
rines provided their own food ; for one of the 



objections of the English merchants to the 
Union was that the Scots could freight their 
ships so cheaply, partly because they "go 
not to sea as our men goe, everyone for 
wages in certainty and feeding on the Vic- 
tualles or Owner on the best Beefe Porke 
Beere Biskett of the finest Wheat . . . But 
everyone finds himself the whole Voyage 
eates no Bread but Oaten Cakes made of 
Bean baked on the hearth and salt fiish 
fryed on the Coales from hand to mouth by 
himself." The same pamphlet tells how 
"everyone in their ships is a kind of Mer- 
chant himself and will be sure to bring some 
Lynnen Scotch Cloth or Such like from home 
upon his own Account and make a like Re- 
turne of some Commodities which the fforeign 
market yieldeth" — a practice forbidden by the 
English merchants for fear of ruining their 
own market. The skippers were ordered to 
warn the mariners to bring each his own 
"furing," as this parcel of goods which he 
was allowed to take with him was called, to 
the ship as soon as its lading was begun. 

Provision was made for the treatment of 
a mariner who received "skaith in the schipis 
laubour," if it was not his own fault, and of 
any who were too ill to remain on board. 
The skipper had to send the seick and decei.s- 
sit to land and provyid for him ane herbere, 
with ane to awaitt vpoun him, an furneiss him 
with mcitt and licht, as his necessitte re- 
quyreiss." If any skipper was "schip-brokin" 
he and his company were to save the ship 
and goods if they possibly could, and any 
mariner who did not do his utmost to help 
was to lose his hire and to be held an un- 
honest man and unworthy to be received 
amongst the company of his fellows. 

The skippers and sailors belonged chiefly 
to the East of Scotland. The Fife and 
I'^orth ports and Aberdeen and Dundee 
tradded to the Baltic countries. Holland, 
France, and Spain, and occasionally as far 
as the Azores, and some of their ships were 
employed by French merchants. They suf- 
fered a good deal from pirates of Algiers and 
Morocco, and many applications were made 
for authority to take contributions for ran- 
soms, sometimes at the parish churches all 
through the country, or occasionally permis- 
sion was given for one person to travel about 
the country collecting where he could. The 
burghs on the West had at this time but 
little trade, chiefly to France and Ireland. 
The trade with the West which was to bring 
fortune to them did not begin till late in the 
seventeenth century. — Theodora Keith, in the 
Sailors' Magazine. 



FACTS ABOUT CANCER. 



ATLANTIC LINERS. 



The comparative length, displacement and 
horsepower of Atlantic liners is shown in the 
following compilation : 

Displace- 

Length, ment. Horse 

Name. Date. feet. tons, power. 

Great Eastern 1858 680 27,000 7,650 

Britannic 1874 455 8,500 5.500 

Umbria 1885 500 10,500 14,300 

Campania 1893 600 18,000 30,000 

K. Wilhelm der 

Grosse 1899 625 20,800 30.000 

Detitschland 1900 662 23,600 .36,000 

Kaiser Wilhelm IT.. 1903 678 26.000 38.000 

Adriatic 1907 725 38,000 40.000 

Lusitania 1907 790 45.000 68.000 

Olympic 1908 860 48,000 72,000 

Imperator 1913 900 50,000 80,000 



As a tree is strengthened by pruning, 
so the labor movement may be improved 
by cutting out those elements that prop- 
erly belong in some other movement. 



The study of cancer in manj' countries is 
leading to the collection of data that are of 
much interest. As frequently noted, statis- 
tics in general seem to reveal an increase in 
cancer; but whether this may not be the 
outcome of greater accuracy in diagnosis is 
a question concerning which there is still a 
difference of opinion. Obviously, on the 
basis of the figures and facts now avail- 
able, the solution of the question as to 
whether or not cancer is on the increase is 
most difficult. In the future the conditions 
for reliable comparisons will be more satis- 
factory. 

The reports on cancer statistics coming 
from different countries are sometimes so 
much at variance as to suggest either that 
the mode of life and external conditions 
must play a large part in cancer or that the 
statistics given do not represent the true 
state of affairs. One example of this dis- 
crepancy may be cited. It is generally be- 
lieved that cancer affects women much 
more frequently than men. Statistics from 
England and other countries indicate that 
it is so; but in Norway this does not seem 
to be the case. 

Soegaard's recent anah'sis of the statis- 
tics gathered in Norway by the Norwegian 
cancer committee shows a greater number 
of men to have cancer than women. The 
difference in favor of men is not large — of 
37.046 deaths from cancer during 1865-1895, 
18,413 were in men and 18,633 in women, 
who constitute 51.5 per cent of the Nor- 
wegian population — but the point is that 
here the conditions noted in many other 
countries appear to be reversed. The Nor- 
wegian statistics also show a preponder- 
ance of cancer of the stomach, which is not 
the case in statistics from other countries. 
In a series of 9,528 deaths from cancer, 
5,990, or 62.9 per cent, were caused by 
cancer of the stomach. For the ten years 
1896-1907 following the period covered by 
this series, there were 19,263 deaths in 
Norway due to cancer, of which 12,582, or 
65.3 per cent, were from cancer of the 
stomach. In the province of Nordland 
there were 1.235 deaths from cancer during 
1896-1907, of which 913, or 73.9 per cent, 
were from gastric cancer. 

The statistics from Norway, evidently 
gathered with real care and under favorable 
conditions, differ from results elsewhere; 
they sho wa greater frequency of cancer in 
they show a greater frequency of cancer in 
the stomach. Either statistics are at fault 
or .social and other conditions play a de- 
cisive part in the development of cancer. 
If the latter is the case, which seems rea- 
sonable enough, the fundamental import- 
ance of accurate statistical studies of can- 
cer under different conditions is self-evi- 
dent. If these studies reveal that in certain 
countries, communities or districts there 
prevails cancer of certain organs or of cer- 
tain types then, says The Journal of the 
American Medical .Association, the next 
step would be to discover and eliminate 
the conditions in which the prevalence de- 
pends. There is great need in this country 
for the accurate study of cancer from this 
angle. 



After all, the "labor question" is but 
an arithmetical question. Unfortunately, 
however, we still lack agreement upon 
the formula by which to solve it. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



\1 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



where. But for eleven months the men, 
splendidly led, held out, and at last they 
have achieved the victory they deserved. 
The trust has capitulated entirely; the lock- 
out is withdrawn, trade unionism is to be 
recognized, and a great uplift has been 
given to the labor cause. 



What the Figures Show^. 

Striking figures are presented in the 
report just completed by the United States 
Bureau of Statistics in regard to union 
scales of wages and hours of labor through- 
out the United States for the years 1907 to 
1912, inclusive. Wages have been in- 
creased and hours have been decreased 
within the last six years in thirty-nine of 
the most important industrial centers. The 
data were furnished by the officials of 
labor unions, and the information used was 
taken from wage scales, written agree- 
ments, and trade-union records wherever 
available. Figures in the table are based 
on a comparison of rates of wages on May 
15 of each year, and the hours prevailing 
during the whole year. The following fig- 
ures are the result of a comparison of the 
hours of labor per week in 1912 with those 
of 1907, and the wages are those of May 
15, 1912, compared with those of May 15, 
1907. So are the figures shown in the 
following table : 



Occupations. 



-4M 2 
Oo 

• 2 c » 
■ o -1 a 

: 3"r 

• tl 

I p« ° 

• ^ '^ ^ 

. & ft 

CD 

■ ^^" 

. 3 CD fD 
. S.(l) !B 

• CP^w 

• ^ .. (D 






" "3 
o o J> 
- c p 



£;3 



BAKERY TRADES. 

Rakers, first hands 17.7 22.0 

Bakers, second hands 6.6 26.6 

Bakers, third hands 10.1 40.7 

BUILDING TRADES. 

Bricklayers 2.1 5.5 

Building laborers 2.5 6.5 

Carpenters 1.2 11.1 

Cement workers (finishers) 1.8 5.7 

Cement workers' helpers 7 16.2 

Cement workers' laborers 1.4 17.5 

Gas fitters 1 91 

Hod carriers 3.0 5.9 

Inside wiremen 1.3 15 4 

Inside wiremen's helpers 2.6 11.7 

Marble setters 1.5 5.1 

Painters 1.9 12^6 

Plasterers 9 50 

Plasterers' laborers 1.0 8.2 

Plumbers 1.2 107 

Sheetmetal workers 1.7 12.9 

Steamfitters 2.0 13.1 

Steamfitters' helpers 1.7 15.1 

Stonemasons 1.8 5.8 

Structural ironworkers 2.7 11.1 

MARBLE AND STONE TRADES. 

Granite cutters 2.0 5.3 

Stonecutters 5 1 6 

METAL TRADES. 

Blacksmiths 2.1 10.3 

Blacksmiths' helpers 2.2 16.4 

Boilermakers 1.6 15.6 

Boilermakers' helpers 2.4 16.9 

Cor-emakers 2.3 13.8 

Machinists 2.2 9.6 

Molders, iron I.3 74 

Patternmakers, wood 2.8 8.3 

PRINTING TRADES, BOOK AND JOB. 

Bookbinders 11.1 16.8 

Compositors, book and job 10.0 

Electrotypers: 

Ratterymen and builders 4.2 17.5 

Finishers 5.3 12,8 

Molders 5.1 12,7 

Linotype operators 2 7.0 

Press feeders 9.8 22,6 

Pressmen, cylinder presses 6,0 21.0 

Pressmen, platen presses 5.1 14.8 

PRINTING TRADES, NEWSPAPER. 

Compositors, day work ; 5 10.4 

Compositors, night work 1 6.1 

Linotype operators, day work 4 8.6 

Linotype operators, night work 3 5.9 

Pressmen, web presses, day work. 1.5 12,1 

Pressmen, web presses, night work 1.5 9.1 

Stereotypers, day work 1.7 9.1 

Stcreotypers, night work 1.6 9.0 



Why They Didn't Shoot. 

Sensational stories are current regarding 
the conference between the Government 
officials and mine leaders, which resulted 
in a settlement of the gold mine strike on 
the Rand on July 5 last. Some of the 
labor leaders assert that General Louis 
Botha, former premier of the Union of 
South Africa, and General Smuts, Minister 
of the Interior, Mines, and Defense, were 
compelled at the point of a revolver to sign 
the agreement. General Smuts has issued 
a denial of this. After the settlement was 
signed at the Carlton Hotel, according to 
Secretary Bain, of the Trades Federation, 
and Secretary Matthews, of the Miners' As- 
sociation, all the conferees stood on the 
balcony of the hotel and observed soldiers 
with rifles leveled ready to fire at the 
crowd of demonstrators in the street. Two 
of the labor leaders again covered General 
Botha and General Smuts with revolvers. 
"One more shot and you are dead," said 
one of them. The ministers thereupon com- 
manded the soldiers not to shoot. 



Japan's Unemployed Problem. 

Like many other great cities, Tokyo has 
an unusually large number of unemployed, 
and it is increasing at an alarming figure. 
Many of those locating there come from 
the country with high ambitions. In a 
short time they discover that all desira- 
ble positions have been previously pre- 
empted and find it extremely difficult to 
secure employment. This summer the num- 
ber of unemployed has been exceptionally 
large, most of the men being in the prime 
of life, and are sometimes found in des- 
perate condition, wanting for the actual 
necessaries of life and having nothing to 
eat for days at a time. This same condi- 
tion is reported to be true of many of 
the larger cities, and no doubt is one of 
the causes which is forcing the Govern- 
ment to seek some place to locate this 
large surplus in order to avoid serious com- 
plications, and a probable revolution, unless 
some means is secured to relieve the ex- 
traordinary pressure that is felt at the 
present time. 



To Adopt A. F. of L. Plan. 

The French General Confederation of 
Labor is said to be split into two factions, 
one known as the "Red," and the other as 
the "Yellow," designated as the conserva- 
tive and the revolutionary groups. Other 
subdivisions are also said to exist as the 
result of syndicalism and opposition to 
three-year service in the army. One fac- 
tion to-day is advocating a general strike. 
The other and larger group is inviting labor 
unions to redouble their activities and is 
encottraging the growing opposition among 
the working classes. This last is the of- 
ficial attitude of the Confederation of La- 
bor, and as the "Reds" are dominant, this 
rather vague program is taken by the 
French government as a sign that the nu- 
merous arrests of labor leaders, for anti- 
military teachings, have had effect. It is 
predicted that Confederation will scarcely 
need a dissolution order from the Govern- 
ment, but that it will fall of its own accord. 
Whatever happens, there is a strong move- 
ment on foot throughout France among 
labor leaders to build up a new Confedera- 
tion upon the ruins of the old, patterning 
it as far as possible after the American 
Federation of Labor in the United States. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATPORM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Posts] Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

2t ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. •. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



I 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Residence Phone Ballard 1639 



The contract for floating the Brit- 
ish steamship Gleaen, ashore at Oc- 
roacok, N. C, has been awarded to 
the Weatherspoon Wrecking Com- 
pany, of New York. 

The U. S. Navy Department has 
accepted the bid of D. B. Dearborn, 
New York, for the transportation of 
coal from the Atlantic Range to Hon- 
olulu by the American sailing ship 
"John Ena," 4,200-4,300 tons' ca- 
pacity, at $6.00 per ton. 

After a brave fight to keep her 
from sinking, the barge Anna M. 
McNally arrived at Norfolk on Sep- 
tember 12 in command of Captain 
William Eggers. She broke adrift 
during a storm off the Virginia coast 
a week ago. She had 6j^ feet of 
water in her hold when she arrived. 
Her deckload of lumber was carried 
overboard. 

Collision with a whale caused such 
serious damage to the Danish steam- 
er "Vladimir Reitz" that the vessel 
was forced to put in at St. Johns, N. 
F., for repairs. The accident occurred 
about 250 miles east of St. Johns. The 
whale struck the steamer head-on, 
knocking a four-foot hole in the bow. 
The accident is believed to have killed 
the whale, which sank immediately, its 
blood discoloring the water over a 
large area. The steamer left Camp- 
bellton, N. B., September 11 for Ply- 
mouth, England, with lumber. She 
will discharge her cargo to permit 
repairs to be made. 

A large Paris factory is busy filling 
an order for thousands of mattresses 
which are pronounced unsinkable 
mattresses. An unnamed experi- 
menter recently discovered a vege- 
table substance which is light, supple 
and soft enough for use as mattresses 
in berths aboard ship, and at the 
same time unsinkable. Every pass- 
enger on a ship furnished with these 
mattresses — if they are what is 
claimed for them — will have an ideal 
life preserver right in his bed. Sev- 
eral large steamship companies are 
said to have decided to replace their 
present bedding with these new mat- 
tresses. 

The insurance of the Hamburg- 
American Company's mammoth new 
liners, "Imperator" and "Vaterland," 
are now being placed at Lloyd's. The 
values of these latest Atlantic grey- 
hounds run well over $10,000,000. The 
"Imperator" is said to have cost in 
the neighborhood of $6,000,000 and 
her insured value was put at $5,250,- 
000. A sum of $1,750,000 was in- 
sured in Hamburg and London, with 
the understanding that the under- 
writers should be free from claims 
of under 1 per cent.; a sum of 
$500,000 was covered against risks of 
total loss and general average and 
$2,000,000 was insured in a pool 
wherein the Cunard and White Star 
companies participate. 

The list of large fore-and-aft rig- 
ged sailing vessels in the coastwise 
trade is being steadily depleted by 
the elements. At the present rate, 
the end of this type of craft is al- 
ready in sight and the best-known 
firms of American sailing shipowners 
are either having built, or contem- 
plate building, steamers. Another 
of the large schooners which has 
just been added to the long list of 
wrecks is the "George W. Wells," 
which stranded South of Hatteras, 
while on a voyage from Boston for 
Fernandina. The report says that 
her crew, with two women and two 
infants, were rescued with great diffi- 
culty by the life savers of the Ocra- 
coke and Durant life saving stations. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
202-4 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SmATTLB. WASH. 



Vernon W. Buck Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & KNUTSON 
Lawyers and Prectors In Admiralty 
Free Advice to Seamen. 

126S Elmpire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia 8ts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 2S-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAIM&SCHERMER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE. WASH. 

Seattle Navigation School 

Open the entir* year, 
and In touch with 
latest requlrwnenta. 
Candld&tM thoroughly 
prepared for Ucenae 
of any grade; Master, 
Blate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 

By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity NauUcal CoUega, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDINQ 
911 Western Ave., SBATTLB, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 664 




SMOKB 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 



C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider. Syrups, SarsaparlUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL.. 

White Labor Only 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



R. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, H/its and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



Tot 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Smattle, Wash., Letter Liet. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattie 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
p«rlod, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 
Abrahamsen, Jo- Johnson. A. 

hannes Jensen, Hans -21H 

Anderson, H. Jensen, G. S. 

Andersen, A. -1352 Johanson. Knut 
Alonzo, J. Johannesen. Olaf 

Absalomsen, O. M. Johanson, K. J. 
Alexis, H. Johanson, Theodor 

Agerup. K. B. Johnson. G. 

.'Vndersen, O. -1719 Johnson, Olaf 
Anderson, A. -1821 Kalning. J. 
Anderson, H. Tornl Krutz, Ivan 
Andenson. Ragnvald KlebnikofC, I. W. 
Anderson, David Korber, Th. 
Anderson. I. Kreutz, Karl 

.\nderson. Hjalmar Karsima. N. 



Behr. Henry 
Rurholtz, F. 
Rorgen. K. S. 
Brox. H. 
Brower. G. 
Broberg, Chas. 
Ruekow. C. W. 



Karrell, J. 
Kolberg. Joe 
Larsen. L. A. 
Larsen, Charles 
Little, Sid 
Ljunggren, Edmund 
Lof. Oscar 



Christensen. Anton I..arson. Ingvald 



Crosley, J. 
Carlson, Thure 
Davidson, Jacob 
Davis, Joseph 
Dvlwik. E. 
Dall. Carl 
Rllinsen. H. O 
Enig, Herman 
Ehlert. August 
Edvardsen, Anton 
Ekwall, G. -V. 
Ellison, Sam 
Eiiason, C. 
Erikson, Axel 
Eskilson. Lars 
Evanger, Nils 
Fonsliind. Victor 



I..arsen, Axel 
Larson. John 
Lovera, P. 
Lackey, C. 
Larsen, L. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen. A. 
Larsen. Fred 
Lundgren, K. J. 
Marks, T. 
Martins, Paul 
McPhorson, R. 
McCarthy, J. 
Mortensen. J. C 
Murphy, D. 
Mynchmeyer, H, 
Maver. J. S 



1746 



Frffiriksen. Harold Macdonald, N. 



Fipllman, Geo. 
Freeman, J. 
Franzell, A. 
Fielst.nd, K. M. 
Forson. Alex 
Fortune. John 
Framness. Ivar 
Gaugserud, O. K. 
Gfhler, F. 
Grant, J. J. 
Grantley, C. W. 
Gunderson, I>. S. 
Hansen, A. M. 
Hansen, Hans 
Helpap, A. 
H.insen, Hans P. 
Hansen. N. S. 
Hosrlund, Ephralm 
Hoist. L. 
Hubner. Herman 
.Tapper. F. J. 
.Tacobsen. Torglls 
Jacobsen, Johan 



Martinsen. flarold 
Maki, Ivar 
Mathisen. Nils 
McNeary. J. 
McDougall, J. 
Miller. J. C. 
Mikkelsen, K 
Moore, J. M. 
Muir, J. 
Munroe, W. 
Martinsen, Ragn 

vald 
Newland E. 
Nielsen, F. M. 
Nilsen. T. H. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nelson, H. J. 
Nlcholsen. F. E. 
Nilson, Andrew 
Nollsen, Eflvard 
Nielsen, Alfons 
Nilsen. Albert 
Nylund, Arthur 



1(!20 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 449 



■Vbr.imis, George 
■Vnderson, Sam 
Anderson, Gust, 

-1808 
Anderson. Nils 
.\nderson. Die 
Andersen, Mike 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Erik B. 
Mlexander, John 
Albrechtsen, Page 
.VndroUo, A. 
Ronjinan. Karl W. 
Brodig, Wm. G. 
Bulls, Ernest 
Buckmer, W. 
Carlsen, Charlie 
Chase, W. P. 
Christensen, Albert 
Colman, E. 
Conway, M. E. 
Collins, Frank 
Cunnicham. W. P. 
Dahl, Henry 
Day. Aca 
Dennis, Charlie 
Dorff. William 
Edstrom, John 
Kheiibaugh. W. J. 
Kkliam. Frans 
Fredrkkson. H. G. 
Gjortz, P. 
Gordia. Piet 
Gulliksen, Amandus 
Hall. G. A. 
Hansen, Bernard 
Helin, Waldemar 
Henriks, Waldemar 
llenke. Ernest 
Hellman, Albin 
Hclenius, Oskar 
Hohm, E. 
Huntington, E. R. 
Hoch, Gore 
llultman, A. 
Joliansen, Johan F. 
Jolinsen, Chris 
Jolin.son, Axel 
Johnson, .Tack 
Johnson, Die C. 
Johnson, W. 
.lohnson, H. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Karlson, K. E. 
Ivpnny, James 
Kealy, James 
Kikur, Allesander 
Koop, Nick 
Kronstrand, H. T. 
Krlstensen, W. 
Koalvik. Oscar 
Laine. Frank 
I..arsen. John 
Larsen, George 

Lurberg 



Larsen, Engvald 
Larsen. Martin, 

-1710 
Larsen, Soren 
Lerch. Paul 
Lewik, Karl 
Lemarchand, Louis 
Lendeman, Ruhtil 
Lundsoor, Oskar 
Lundmark, Heege 
Lundquist. Ernest 
Macrae, Alle.\ander 
Marchand, Louis 
Mattson, Maurits 
Miller, Chas. 
McManus, John 
McMahon, Jack 
Mcinke, Rudolf 
Meyer, W. 
Nelson, Anton 
Nelsen, C. J. 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Nielsen, Edward 
Nilsson, Osvold 
Narberg, John 
Narman, Ludwig 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Olsen, Severin 
Olsen. Ausgar 
O'Brien. Jack 
Person. Charles 
Perouse. Andre 
Petrich. Theodore 
Petersen. Aage 
Peterson, Hans 
Peterson, ITeinie 
Petterson, Einar 
Pedersen, Peter 
Pratt, M. L. 
Rantio, Jacob 
Raetz, August 
Rasniussen, Thor 
Roed. Halfdan 
Sandstrom, Hugo 
Sanders, Chas. 
Simens, O. L. 
Scliulz, Robert 
Saule, J. L. 
Swan.son, John 
Swenson, Carl Oscar 
Saukha, August 
Swenson, John B. 
Thomas. A. 
Tamford. B. A. 
Trost, Peter 
Wall. W. H. 
Warren. Chas. B. 
Wadren. G. F. 
Westlund. Gust 
Wehl. J. 

Wiojurecht. Ernest 
Weshart, Jno. 
Welsen. J. 
Bunk, Bruno 



O'Brien. J. S. 
Olsen, C. 
Olsen, Trygve 
Olsson, Brov 
Olsen, O. -1062 
Olsen, Ed 
Olson, C. E. 
Olsen, B. -597 
Omholt, T. 
Orel), A. 
I'edorsen. O. A. 
I'oppe, Geo. 
I'etterson, Karl 
Pedersen, Hedley 
Pedersen. P. C. 
Pedersen, Peder 



Persson, Johan 
Petterson, Harry 
Petersen, V. -1447 
Petterson, Richard 
Petterson, S. 
Quigley. R. E. 
Rees, W. 

Skubber. H. (Reg- 
istered) 
Stahlbaum, E. 
Stone, C. L. 
."^audburg, C. 
Schuldt, Theoder 
Seley, G. 
Sterr, W. T. 
Saar, J. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

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liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12B D. St., EurekJ, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON. Prop. 



HOTEL YOUNG 

European Plan 

313-315-317 SECOND ST., EUREKA 

Rooms, 25c per Night up 

Per Week, $1.50 up 

UNION LUNCH COUNTER 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PALMER, Proprietor 
A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand — Sailors' Hall— 553-R 
EUREKA 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union made. 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 
Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

Eureka, CaL, Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Harry 
Anderson, John 
Breien, Hans 
Clausen, Fred 
Debus, Fred 
Elilert. August 
Gudmundsen. Gud- 

mund 
Hansen, Harald 
Ismas. Richard 

Samuelson, H. 
Schultz. P. (Regis- 
tered) 
Schultz, Axel 
Scott, Alfred 
Starness, C. O. 
Storek 

Stewart. J. G. 
Strauss, W. 
St. Johns, C. R. 
Suarth. A. 
Steel, J. R. 
Sharnesa, C. O. 
Sperlan, B. 



Jacobsen. W. 
Jensen. George 
Nilson. Anton 
Miller. Fred 
Publlcatus. August 
Plas. Henry 
Robertson, A. 
Syvertsen. Paul 
Thorsen. Fredrik 



Thomson, P. 
Tyghe. T. 
Thienpolnt, F. 
Thogren. David 
Thorsen. Tom 
Veasted, T. P. 
Van Loo, A. 
Verney, A. 
Walschwell. A. 
Warner, Jake 
Waters, I^. A. 
WehdP, F. 
Wessman, John 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 
Office: 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers In 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Tacoma, WomH., Letter List. 



Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Berglind, Erik 
Conley, J. H. 
Dehler, Alfred 
Christensen, Albert 
Dehler, Alfred 
Ellison, Harry H. 
Eidsvcog, Fetter 
F'ors, Alfred 
Grovefi Albert 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hangen, Arthur 
Hetman, Walter 
Iversen, Ivar 



Jorgensen, Peter A. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Kesler, Karl 
Kathy. A. 
Melgail, M. 
Moren, G. H. 
Nilsson, Edvin 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Persson, John 
Plesner, Levi J. 
Person, Fritis 
Petterson, J. M. 
Simonsen, Sigvald 
Seblom, John 
Thorsen, Axel L. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman Sc Kati, Just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers* Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec-Treas. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 

Chaa. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 
Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 

311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, -1283 
Aalto, Waino 
Andersen, P. C. 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Arntzen, Werner 
Andersen, -1352 
Armstrong. Harry 
Batchall, Alex. 
Brust, Frank 
Behn, Alfred 
Brown, C. 
Christensen, Albert 
Carson, Edward 
Campbell, M. 
Donohue, J. O. 
Eriltsen, -837 
Edwards, J. T. 
Edwardsen, Anton 
Eissing, B. 
Finth, Richard 
Flatten, James 
Feitz, F. 
Graf, Otto 
Glase, Gustav 
Hvid, Hans 
Hansson, Alf. 
Hansen, Jens 
Hansen, Torlelf 
Jensen, Fredrik 
Jansson, J. 
Jacobsen, Peder 
Johansen, Tobias 
.'ensen, Harry 
Klepzig, Otto 
Kallio, Fran 
Lengt&sen, Gottfried 
Lundmark, Ilelge 
Ljungberg, Htrman 
Larsen, Peter 
Linsler, A. B. 
Lindroos, A. W. 
Lalning, Herman 



Lalne, Herman 
Larsen, Lars 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Lauritzen, George 
London, A. 
Mattson, K. A. 
Mortensen, C. 
MacManus, Hugh 
Muller, I. B. 
Miller, Winford 
Mertz, G. 
Muller, Walter 
MacFadden, Wm. 
Mekerman, Ernest 
Nikolin. E. Miko 
Nilson, Jack 
Oksanen, Juko 
Pankhurst, Thos. 
Peterson, Axel 
Pedersen, -1054 
Pedersen, Oscar 
Petersen, Christian 
Petersen, Aago 
Razehelm, Franz 
Runge, V. 
Rommel, Andrew 
Sanders, Robert 
Siren. Frans 
Samuelsen, W. 
Speckman, Max 
Schramm, A. 
Siegund, Justus 
Thorn, -70 
Quarnstrom, Aleck 
Walley, A. J. 
Zoerb, Walter 
Wlntura, Fred 
Packages. 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Sorensen, C. T. F. G. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Careful Service 



Phone 691 



At 



Stand: 
Sailors' Union Office 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Bopts, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - • - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



When on Gray's Harbor Smoke 

Grandmont Cigars, 10c. 

Union Pilot, 5c. 

Best Union Made Cigars on 
the market. 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

4201/2 E. Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS 



LEADING JEWELERS AND 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 



Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

BURNETT BROS., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News and 
Drug Co. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

DRUGS, BOOKS, STATIONERY 

We Specialize on Medicine Chests 

Agt. S. F. Examiner, Chronicle & Call 



RAYMOND, WASH. 

THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 
Seamen's JoumaL 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 
Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St.. Aberdeen, Waih. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorperated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

A. W. BARKLEY 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

All Union Made Goods 

203-5 G Street, 
Aberdeen ... Washington 




1 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
New Orleans, La. 

Valetine (Walter) Zima from Lu- 
biachowo, Kreis Schrimm, Province 
Posen, Germany; last address Sail- 
ors' Union Hall, Seattle. Please 
communicate with Imperial German 
Consul, Seattle, Wash. 

Axel Peterson, F. Lundberg, J. 
Gustafson, M. Garcia, crew of the 
steamer Riverside, at the time she 
towed in the Oceana .Vance, kindly 
call at the office of the Charles Nel- 
son Co. for money due them. 

Victor N. Kvenen, a native of 
Belgium, age 32, last heard of in 
Ashtabula, Ohio, April, 1909, inquired 
for by his brother John Kvenen, 
Route 2, Raleigh, Tenn. 



CNfiGATION^ 



:.t 



^'6 

I Co 



This Book Free 

If you want to know more 
about Navigation, we will 
send this book free to you. 
It tells how young men have 
advanced to better positions 
— how they have climbed 
from small beginnings to 
the highest positions of 
master and officers of sea- 
going craft. It is an inspir- 
ing booklet. 

Mark and mail this coupon 
today. 



* inlernailonai correspondence schools * 

* Box 898, Scranton, Pa. * 

* Please senil me your Iree booklet. eTiaining * 
^ Courses in Ocean, Coast, and Lake Navltallon. ^ 

♦ Name. . * 

♦ • 

• St.&No * 

* City 




.State_ 



Two men were killed and four in- 
jured by an explosion on the United 
States torpedo boat Craven at sea. 
The United States won the re- 
volver team championship at Camp 
Perry. Argentine was second and 
Peru third. 

It was reported that President Wil- 
son and Governor General Harrison 
would work for the eventual inde- 
pendence of the Philippines. 

Mayor Gaynor of New York City 
died of heart disease, September 11, 
while aboard a vessel bound for 
Europe. 

Five persons were killed and at 
least $100,000 damage caused by a 
cloudburst that swept Goldfield, Nov. 
Several mines were reported to be 
inundated. 

The headquarters of the eleventh 
lighthouse station was ordered to be 
removed to Milwaukee from Chicago 
because the smaller city had a more 
open harbor in winter. 

The losses by fire in the United 
States and Canada in the month of 
August, aggregate $21,180,700, as com- 
pared with $14,158,800 in August of 
1912, showing an increase of about 
50 per cent. 

The population of Kansas is 1,685,- 
621, a gain of 16,325 over 1912, ac- 
cording to official figures announced 
by the State Board of Agriculture. 
In 1912 the State lost 17,351 over 
the census figures of 1911. 

The assessed valuation of real es- 
tate in New York City this year 
is $8,010,000,000. This is an increase 
over last year of $150,000,000. The 
bulk of the increase comes from new 
hotels and office buildings. 

A Government report showed the 
cost of living on June 15 was at 
practically the same level as in No- 
vember, when the high record of 
the last quarter century was reached, 
60 per cent, higher than between 
1890 and 1900. 

Death or disability claimed 10,385 
victims employed in the industries 
of California during 1912, according 
to the annual report of the State 
Industrial Accident Board Of the 
10,385 accidents reported, 412 resulted 
fatally, and 534 accidents made per- 
manent cripples of the victims. 

California led in the United States 
in gold production for 1912, putting 
out $20,008,000; Colorado came sec- 
ond with $18,741,200, and Alaska third 
with $17,198,600. The production of 
gold in the United States during 1912 
amounted to $93,451,000, a decrease 
of $3,438,500 as compared with the 
previous year, and the lowest Amer- 
ican production since 1907. 

The Democratic tariff revision bill 
passed the Senate on September 9 
amid a burst of applause that swept 
down from crowded galleries and 
found its echo on the crowded floor 
of the Senate. Its passage was at- 
tended with surprises in the final 
moments of the voting, when Sena- 
tor La Follette, Republican, cast 
his vote with the Democrats, and 
was joined a few moments later by 
Senator Poindexter, Progressive. 

The body of "Big Tim" Sullivan, 
the New York politician and mem- 
ber of Congress, was recognized in 
the morgue of Bellevue Hospital, in 
that city, as it was about to be 
conveyed to the potter's field for 
burial. He had wandered from his 
brother's house at Williamsbridge, 
on August 31, and been struck by a 
railroad train and killed, and the body 
lay unidentified in the morgue at 
Fordham during the intervening two 
weeks. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



Announcement has just been made 
by the Secretary of the United Mine 
Workers that the paid-up member- 
ship on August 31 was 409,158, the 
largest number in the history of the 
organization. In all mining sections 
of the United States and Canada a 
vigorous and aggressive campaign of 
organization is being carried on and 
large accessions are being made. 

At the Red Jacket (Pa.) furnace 
of the Carnegie Steel Company and 
the Atlantic furnace of the Republic 
Iron and Steel Company molten iron 
burst through the base of a stack 
at each, killing one man and in- 
juring another in each accident. At 
the Atlantic furnace Samuel Hanna 
was so burned by molten metal that 
his body was scarcely recognizable. 
George Mitchell was burned severely, 
but probably will recover. 

So deplorable were the sanitary 
conditions found in the ten sweat 
shops in Philadelphia by the repre- 
sentatives of the State Department 
of Labor that permits were suspended 
until the shops were put in healthful 
condition. No work will be permit- 
ted in any of these places until the 
law is complied with. The reports 
of the department indicate that not 
more than 25 per cent, are up to the 
standard required by the laws of the 
State. A vigorous campaign is now 
being carried on to correct the evils 
which have existed for years past. 

Fifteen thousand painters and pa- 
perhangers, members of the Interna- 
tional Painters and Paperhangers' 
Union, who were on strike in New 
York City for twelve days have re- 
turned to work, the fight having 
ended in a complete victory for 
them. Practically all of the demands 
of the union were conceded by the 
employers at a conference between 
both sides. By the terms of the 
agreement, which will expire in the 
first week of September, 1914, the 
workers win a forty-four-hour work 
week; a strictly closed shop; not 
less than $3.40 a day for painters, 
and 30 and 35 cents a roll for paper- 
hangers. 

At the Illinois State Federation of 
Labor Convention, which will be 
held at Decatur, October 14 to 18, 
fraternal delegates from the sur- 
rounding States and also from the 
Engineers, Firemen, Conductors, and 
Trainmen Brotherhoods will be 
seated. This movement is hoped 
to result in much good and eventual- 
ly to bring into closer relations the 
interest of the workers represented, 
and also that it will probably result 
in other State bodies following a 
similar course. The Decatur meet- 
ing will be the largest in the his- 
tory of the State Federation; 500 
delegates are expected to be present, 
which will make it a record-breaking 
meeting. 

Officials of the Illinois United 
Mine Workers have begun prepara- 
tions to defend a unique charge that 
would make the organization liable 
for damages to an employer against 
whom a strike was called. The bill 
of complaint has been received. Mi- 
ners employed by the Boyd Coal and 
Coke Company, of St. Clair County, 
Illinois, were called out last April. 
That company now sues for dam- 
ages because of the loss of business 
due to the strike and for loss due 
to alleged broken contracts with la- 
borers. The court is asked to en- 
join the officers of the mine work- 
ers from further interference with 
the mine or from inducing the men 
to remain away from the mine. 



San FrancUco Letter Liet. 



Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt. Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abrahamsen, Aslak 
Ahlberg, John 
Alver, Ben 
Andersen, A. 
Andersen, Albert 
Andresen, Anton 
Andersen, Carl 

Osker 
Andersen, Edward, 

1S9G 
Andersen. Fred 
Anders, Fred 
Andersen. H. J. 
Andersen, Lue 
Andersen, -1526 
Andersen, S. P. 
-Anderson, A. C. 
Anderson, Alex 
Anderson, Andrew 
Anderson, Arnold 
Anderson, Arvid 
Anderson, Carl 
Anderson, David 
Anderson, Ernest 
Baklier, Haakon 
Ballot, John 
Barton, W.. F. 
Baumert, -2024 
Bausbeck. Erwln 
Beams. Carl S. 
Belirens, Herman 
Bekker, George 
Bellos, Jack -2036 
Bendsen, Harry 
Benson, A. 
Benson, Helge 
Benson. John E. 
Bendtsen, Henry, 

1S93 
Bentsen, Lars 
Bergman, Waldemar 
Bcrsslrom, C. 
Berknes. Ole 
Bcrnliard. Oscar 
Bierstet -1736 

Bilke, Edw. 
Caine, V. 
Callon, Jose 
Cambrou, G. C. 
Cannon, Alex. 
Cannon. Ed. 
Carlniark. B. G. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Carl 
Carlson, Gustag 
Carlson, Henning 
Carlson. Julius 
Cailson, O. S. 
Carroll. A. R. 
Chaler. Buntiata 
Clierniavsky, M. 
Dahl, Ben 
Dahler, H. X. 
Dahlgren, Niels 
Danielson, D. 
Delias, James 
Dehler, Alfred 
Dillon. Patrick 
ricering. Erith 

Dohmann, 

Eckhoff, Otto 
Econen, Albert 
Ecstorm. George 
Egeland, O. O. 
Ehringer, F. W. 
Ekendahl. W. 
Ekwall, Gust 
Elholm, Peter 
Elisen, Sam 
For'-gn. William 
Foerg, Wm. 
Form, Frank 
Fors, Alfred 
Eraser -740 
Fraudsen, L. M. 
Fredrichs, C. 
Fredrickson, Carl 
Garbrick, Luis 
Garrlnen, V. 
Gcclman, PJacob 
Gerner, Hans 
Gifford, S. 
Gllje, Severln 
Glannus, Alex 
Gorsch, 'W. 
Grana, Collin 
Grant, David 
Grantley, C. M. 
Grauberg. Fred 
Grlel, Bernhard 
GroEsel, Jasef 
Ilaak, R. 
Haaversen. Nils 
llaggors, Fred 
Hakassars, A. W. 
Haldin, Fred. 
Halvorsen, -2229 
Hammel, Otto 
Hannus, M. 
Hansen. C.irl 
Hansen, Chas. G. 
Hansen, C. T. 
Hanson, Emanual 
Hansen, Frank 
Hansen, Fred 
Hansen, George 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen. H. G. 
Hansen. H. R. 
Hansen, I., -21.')6 
Hansen, John P. 
Hansen, M., -9CS 
Hansen, Oscar 
Hanson, L. P. 
Hayes, J. B. 
Heart. Charles 
Helberger. M. 
Irwlng, James 
Iversen, John 
Jackson, Harry 
Jacobsen. O. F. 
Jarl. Haakon 
Jensen, G. 
Jensen, George 
.lansen. Hans 
Jansen, .Tens B. 
Jensen, Ole 
Jensen, Oscar 
Jensen, C. 
Jensen, H. R. K. 
Jensen, Jens 
Jensen, L. 
Jensen, Robert 



Anderson, F. 
Anderson, G. 
Andirrson, Gus 
Anderson. Hilding 
Anderson, Jim 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Josef 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson. Peter 
Anderson. S. 
Anderson, Thorus 

H. 
Anderson, Uno 
Anderson. Wm. 
Aner, Wm. 
Andrcasen, -1477 
Andstrom. Axel 
Applequest, Otto 
Apsit, J. 
Arndt, Mike 
Arvldsson, Hjalmar 
Asplund. Karl O. 
Ayers, W. D. 

Billinston, Martin 
Bjorklund, Krik 
B.iornsen, Conrad 
IMair. Francis 
J";in0.hc;ni, O. C. 
Blodslng, Aug. 
Bluchner, Frank 
Bluniel. W. 
Boe, Karl C. 
Boyes, C. 
Pry, George 
Bradley, Clifford 
Brander, W. 
Brennel. Woldemar 
Brims, H. W. 
Eringarud, Harold 
Broscheid. F. O. 
Brownell. W. 
Bruce, P. 
Brusbard, E. 
Bung, Richard 

Christensen, Albert 
Christensen C. 
Christensen. Fred 
Christensen, F. R. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Otto 
Christensen, -905 
'Christesen. Cristens 
Cla.sson. Henry 
Colburn, Geo. 
Conley. J. H. 
Connor, Wm. 
Cook, Herman 
Corley. Howard 
Cunningham, C. 
Donovan. John 
Dories, M. 
Downey, W. J. 
Dracar, E. 
Dropan. Lihua 
Duks, L. 
Dunbar, L. L. 
Durholt, Hugo 

Elliott. Roney 
Engstrom, Ernest 
Eriksen -770 
Erickson, Eric 
Erickson, John W. 
Erlcson, E. R. 
Eriksson, Conrad 
Esklldson. Nils P. 
Evans, S. C. 
Freeman, C. E. 
French, Jack 
Fretzen. B. H. 
Frick. John 
Fridlund, John 
Froberg, Enock 
Frye, Fritz 

Guander, Chr. 
Gudmundsen, B. 
Gulbrandsen -1009 
Gulbransen, Bjorn 
Guldbrandsen. .lack 
Gumoes, Frederick 
Gundersen, Chas. 
Gundersen, P. 
Gunn. F. D. 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustaxsen, Olaf 
Guthre, R. 
Gutman, Jack 

Held, H. J. 
Helnig, J. 
Helsten, Gus 
Helt. I. 

Hendrikson, G. 
Hendry, John 
Henriksen. H. -1333 
Henry, Harriman 
H. H. -2119 
Hermanson -1622 
Hess, Wm. 
Hetinius, Oscar 
Hewitt 
Hjelt, Eric 
Hofer. Richard 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hollowes, L. N. 
Hooner, Harbert 
Hoppner. .Albert 
Hopstad, Sigurd 
Hreija, Joseph 
Hubertz, Emil 
Huntsman, Henry 
Hurst. Jack 
Hushy, Lars 
Huse, E. 
Iverson, Tom 



Johansen -1705 Johnson, II. L. 

Johansen, H. B. Johnson, J. Julius 



Jepsen, S 

Johansen. 

Johan.sen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johnsen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johanson, 

Johansen. 

Johansson 



W. 

Arthur 
August 
C. 

Carl 
Chas. 
E. A. 
Harold V. 
Henry 
-1593 
-2021 
Ole 
Oscar 
Johan 



Johansen, W. 
Johanson, -2104 
.lohnsen, Oscar 
Johnsen -2213 

Johnsen, -1343 
Johnsen, Hans 
Johnson, Berdines 
Johnson, -21y8 
Johnson, C. E. 
Johnson, C. R. 
Johnson, E. 
Johnson, Eric 
Kaare, A. 
Kaare, J. 
Kacymarck, 
Kahnert. Walter 
Kalvetzirjeik, E. 
Karlsen, Gustav 
Kasin, Fritz 
Kardinal, O. 
Karlsen, Hans 
Keinanen. Walter 
Kelly, I. F. 



Johnson, -420 
Johnson, John 
.Tohnson, O. 
Jonsson, Oscar 
Johnson, P. 
Johnson, Ray 
Johnson, Steve 
Jones, Chas. 
Jorgensen, Andrew 
Jorgenson, C. 
Jorgensen. Fred 
Julison, C. 
Kleibingat, Fred 
Klemmansen, Eddy 
Klinker, C. J. 
Kllrberg, Chas. 
Knappe. Adolph 
Kninling. F. 
Kohne. Ernest 
Kolodriew, Joseph G. 
Krlsbjan, A. W. 
Kristonsen. A. 
Kristiansen, Hans 



Kermagoret, AnatoleKrulisch, Franz Paul 
Kilgore, George Kryger, Waldemar 



Kuhners, Walter 
Kydland. Ole 

Leland. F. W. 
Lester, J. O. 
Lind. Gus 
Lindeman, Gus 
Lindgren. Gus 
Llndliolm, Charles 
Llscou, C. 
Lister, P. L. 
Lofgren, Otto 
Lohme. -14S3 
Lorenzen, Henry 
Luehrs, L. 
Lundberg, Harry 



Kinssen. Anti 
Kirkpatrlck. CycU 
Klausen, C. 
Lacey, Thomas 
Langenberg, H. 
Langton, Harry 
T<angwid, Ernest 
Lanner, Rudolph 
Laponble, Jean 
T.arsen -1692 

Larsen, Asmus 
Larsen, F. 
Larsen, Hans 
I>arsen, Johannes 
Larsen, John 

Larsson, Axel =. 

Lasol, Conrad Thos.Lundberg. Thorsten 
I^ughlin, J. M. Lundh._ Harry 



Laurensen, Hugh 
Laydon, D. 
r^eander, Carl 
Leln. G. 
Lekschass, M. 

Maatson, Olaf . --- 

Mackay, Alexander Meislahn, Hans 



Lund, P. 
Lundquist, A. 
Lundqulst, Ernest 
Lyche. H. 

McManus, J. 



.Madson, M. C 
Malmquist, Julius 
Manse. Peter 
Marden, Alfred 
Markman, H. 
Martensen, L C. 
Martin, T. K. 
Martin, H. 
Martin, Jack 
Mastira, Gus G. 
Marton. H. 
Mass, Ernst 
Matson, Morris 
Mattson, A. M. 
Mattson -1818 
Max, Torwald 
Mayes, J. B. 



Merthens. H. 
Mestars, George 
Meyers, Paul 
Meyers, W. 
Michelsen, Alfred 
Milielson, M. 
Milas, Peter 
Milleor, Carl D. 
Miller, W. -2116 
Minor, C. F. 
Moen, Robert 
Mohr, Ernest 
Moller, John 
Monsen, C. 
Monsen, Tollef 
Morris, Oscar R. 
Morrison, A. 



Mayers, Edgart J. Morris, Reuben 
McCarty, P. Mossier, Larence 

McGaldrich, James Murphy, Ch. 



Murphy, Edward 

Nielsen, U. P. 
Nilsen, Anders 
Nilscn, Anton 
Nilsen, Emil 
Nilsen, Michael 
Nilsen, N. 1. 
Nilsen, Nils S. 
Nilson, Axel 
Nolan, George 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Nordin, Gus 
Nordling, Sven 
Nordstrand, Arthur 
Nordstrom, Victor 
Norman, FYed 
Nurgaard. Anton 
Nvberg, Berger, 

-1146 
Nylund, John 

Olsen, Marimus 

Olsen, P. 

Olsen, Robert 

Olsen, Sam 

Olsson, -677 

Olsson, -1187 

Olson, Henrik 

Opitz, G. 

Orfano, Vappo 

Osterberg, J. 

Osterhoft, H. 

Otto, Willi 
yja^a.^ ^-. Ounpun, A. 

Oscar Wll- Owens, Fred 

Owens, John -1158 



McKenzie, W. 
McMahon, J. T. 
Nagel, Alf. 
-Nan jack, Gustav 
Naystrom, Victor 
Neas. W. 
Neilsen, J. C. 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson, Ed. 
Nelson, Lewis 
Nelson, N. C. 
Nelson, W. 

Nesbitt, 

Nest, Filip 
Newman, Tom 
Nielsen. Ed. 
Nichander, Dan 
Nick, Peter 
Nielsen, Jacob 
Nielson, John 
N'ielsen, N. J. 
Nielsen, Pete 
Oberhauser, John 
Oetjen, Fred 
Ogilvlc. Willie 
Ogilvid, W. A. 
Oliver, John 
Olman, P. 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, Hans -794 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, O. 
Olsen, Olof D. 
Olsen, -1222 
Olsen. Oscar F. 
Olsen, 

helm 
Olsen, Otto 
Pahlgren, Pete 
Palndan, C. 
Falyacaa 

Patterson, P. A. 
Paulsen, G. 
PauLsen, Jens 
Pearson, J. T. 
Pearson, J. S. 
Pedersen, Alfred 
Pedersen -ir>61 
Pedersen -1300 
Pedersen, Olav 
Pekman, Ernest 
Pelsckhur 
Pennell, Jim 
PernkI, C. 
Person, Charles 
Person, Leonard 

John 
Persson, C. 
Peters, J. 
Raash, Otto 
Ransohl, Emil 



-678 



Petersen, Carl W. 
Peterson, EJd. 
Peterson, H. 
Peterson, Oscar 
Petersson, Chaa. 
Pettersen, F., -152G 
Pettersen, Fredrick 
Petterson, John G. 
Petterson, Olav 
Pettersson, C. H. 
Petron, A. 
Petz, Gottfried 
Pfeifer, B. 
Piottner, Fred 
Pock, James 
I'orin, A. L. 
Proschech, Paul 
Publlcatus, August 
Punis, Anthoney 
Punta, A. 
Purgold, G. E. 
Rebman, Chaa. 
Redmond, Th. 



Rellas, Jack 
Reshe, G. H. 
Revidan, John 
Rily, C. 
Rivera. A. 
Roalsen, Fred 
Rohan. Billy 
Rohland, Max 
Rog, A. 
Roman, Hank 
Rosbeik, Gustav 
Saalman. Joseph 
Sack, Hans 
Salo, Yrjo 
Sane. T. 
Sammis, C. J. 
Samuels. Harold 
Sandstrom. E. 
Savage, Roland 
Schauer. A. 
Schellenberg, H. 
Scher. G. 
Schmidt, Ernst 
Schmidt, Hans 
Schneider, H. 
Schroder, F. A. 
Schroder, Gus 
Schropster, R. 
Schultz. O. L. A. 
Seibert. Henry 
Selander. W. 
Senger. George 
Sliager. Ernest L. 
Shallies. Chas. 
Shultman. Jacob 
.Shults, Max 
Sikman. Andrei 
Silva, A. 
Silva. Emil 
Sjarbton. Karl H. 
Smith, Donald 
Smith. F. O. 
Smith. G. 
Smyth, Wm. 
Soder. J. 
Soderlund. TTno 
Soheinn. Fritz 

Tammon. Chr. 
Theodore. P. 
Thirup. K. 
Thoisell, Chas. 
'I'hompson. Leander 
Thorne. Richard 
Thorscif, Chas. 
Thorsen, Aksel 
Tipt,jen. B. H. 
Tillman. Andrew 
Todal. Maarten 
Torgersen, H. 



Rosenfeld, Paul 
RosUn, R. 

Rounberg, Edward 
Rudberg, Charlie 
Rundquist, O. 
Russell, Jim 
Ruute. O. 
Ryan. J. R. 
Rydelius, Ralph 
Rylke, Otto 

Sohne. Edw. 
Sonnenberg, J. 
Sorensen, Hans 
Sorensen, Peter 
Sorer.s, Hans -2273 
Souka. August 
Sovchnes, P. Olaf 
Speikman, Max 
Speller. Henrv 
Spillington. S. L. 
Splng. James 
Stahlbaum, Eber- 

hardt 
Stammejohan, C. C. 
Stangland, Peter E. 
Staniland, Herbeit 
Staph, Andreas 
Stein, Emil 
Stolt, A. J. 
Stoltzerman, E. 
Storm. Thos. 
Strand, Konrad 
Strand, IjOuIs 
Strauss. Walter 
Stromsberg. Ivar 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Sundquist. Ernest 
Svedstrup, E. 
Swanson. Chaa. 
Swanson, L. E. 
Swanson. Ole 
Swan, W. S. 
Swarthey, Jack 
Swarthey, Norman 
Swensen, B. 

Torpensen, Guwald 
Torsgren, Carl 
Torstenson. F. 
Tovares. Antonio 
Trede, Hans 
Treucrek 
Tnihack. H. 
Tuck, W. 
Tulujonsckl, Carl 
Tuppit, C. 
Twalg. F. 
Twede, J. 

Usar, T. 



TThltg. Carl 
Ursln. J. 

Vaks. Theodore K. Volkanen, Veda 
Valetinsen. G. , Verney. A. 

Valttl. Jalmar VIeon, C. L. 

Van Katwvk. John Void, O. P. 
Vnn Rosnalen. Voss. Helnrlch 

\elure, J. J. 



Wagner. Willie 
Walch, Michael 
Waldhouse, John 
Wall us. Fred 
WelL-^. Frank 
Walters, Henry 
Wathsted, Albert 
Watti, Jalmar 
Wechman, Paul 
Weiss, V. 
Welch, L. 
Wendel, Emll 
Werth, Gustav 
Westman. Andrew 
Weyer, Paul 
Tanger, I. 
Zechel. Walter 
Ziehr, Ernest 
Zoe, Frank 



Whinner. W. 
^Vhite worth 
Wlckstrom. Axel 
WiU'hlm, Edward 
Willart, Fred 
Williamson. W. A. 
Williams, Thomas 
Wilson, Harry 
Wilson, John E. 
Winblact, M. M. 
Wind. Jacob -1351 
■V^'inkel. August 
Wlnther, Johan 
Wolferen, Svan 
Wrig, Ferdinant 
Yoivola, Gust 
Zorb. W. 
Zorlng. Arthur 
Zunbauer, Karl 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sallori' Union 
of th« Paelflo. 



\nder3on, A. 
Anderson, Anders 
Balda, A. 
Ba y , George 
Brander, M. F. 
Buas, Tomas 
Cain, P. 

Chrlstoflersen, Olaf 
Eilefsen, Otto 
Faulkner, J. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Ginnoes, F. 
Gustavsen. Alfred 
Hansen, Chr. M. 
Hansen, Karl 
Iversen, Reidar 
Johanson, Nils A. 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Jorgensen. Oluv 
Kaare, Juhl 
Kardinal. Otto 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Katwijk, J. W. 
Knappe, Adolph 



Korsberg. Wolmar 
I>;iyUon, D. 
LIndroth, Erik 
Lundgren, K. G. 
Maatson, Olaf 
Morris 

Nelsson, Hasmund 
Olsen, -1244 
Prieherg. P. 
Publlcatus, August 
I'unis, Antony 
Quarsell, Wm. 
Raasch, O. 
RaamuBsen, B. 
Rose, Wm. H. 
Rutter, T. 
Straus. Walter 
Summers, James 
Torkildsen, Jonas 
Trondsen, J. M. 
Wakely, R. E. 
Walters. A. 
Welsen, Julius 
Willander, -876 



Rasmussen, Andrew Reinhold, Ernest 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Andersen, F. K. 
Bensen, John 
Bang, R. O. 
Cefalia, Vinzenco 
Eriksen, Johan 
Husby, Lars 
Hansen, C. 
Janssun, Carl 
Johansen, Johan 
Johanson, E. O. 
Johansen, A. E. 
Johansen, Amlel 



Lundgreen, G. Karl 
Lundquist, Otto 
Larsen, Julius 
LIdsten, C. 
Osterlund, Albert 
Olson, Nels 
Peterson, Carl 
Peterson, Frank V. 
Roelfs, J. 
Remmert, J. 
Wldiund, O. E. 
Walrath, G. O. 



All Aboard! 
SEABOARD HOTEL 

228 East Street, near Howard 

New Seven-story Concrete Building — Modern and Up-to-Date 

250— ROOMS— 250 



Running Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 

Free Shower and Tub Baths 

ELEVATOR SERVICE— ELECTRIC LIGHT 

Call Bell in Every Room— Fine Lobby and Reading Room 



Open All Night 

3Sc to $1.00 per Day $2.00 to $4.00 per Week 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



IS 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Gal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt 

and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30, 1913: 

Assets $55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 
Employees' Pension Fund.. 158,261.32 
Number of Depositors 62,134 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. 
for receipt of deposits only. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. 8. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. OfBce 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Keamy 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor, of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 
Hot and Cold Water In Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Good*. 

50 East St., and 4 Miuion St., 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



INFORMATION WANTED. 




CAPT. CHAS. J. 
SWANSON 

Classy Clothier 

Hatter and Furnisher 

Douglas Shoes 

Uniforms 



Gold Braid and Gold 

Wreaths of All 

Descriptions 



139 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and 
Washington 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Phone Douglas 1082 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 



W. Kahlberg, No. 688, and C. Mon- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street. New York. 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tills l.abel is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



Union 

MADE 



5eer 




AND 

Porter 



<t>^Sh> Of America ric^ 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^r* m Jt y~X T^'^' g "5 •f^ £r» See that this label (in light 
^^^ I X/ 1 1^ .F 1^. 1"^ l^^^^^blue) appears on the box in 
**-''''▼ *^^-^*^*—^*^ ^^-^ which you are served. 



Issued by AuUioiily of tne Cigar MaKefs' Imefnallonal UnloiTof America 

Union-made Cigars. 

<2[hi$ dtiAiivf. 1IM tin citm ctnbiwd iniiiii v» bm b«fi BiM by> nct-Cbss MUNUI 

i WIIKROr THE OM VUta 'linUIIUTIOItU. UWON a Aiuria. in orunzJtKe devoted hithe id 
uncinenufltieMORMU^TOilAlimliliTULIcrilAIWILrworMCRAn. TbtitfonotfaniaMM 
Ukm Ci9jrs U> all sntoken ihtmhout Uw wodd. 
' AU liftM^wiiHU upon (hu UM w b«pun,$b«dMCardin9tDLaML 



*»• SIHILE 



Cjr/Ujfy^mea 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone DougU* 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

Carlsen ^ Marchand 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 

Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 

10 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Bet. East and Steuart Sts. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Lasker Munter, of Spokane, Wash- 
ington, born 1884, left home in 1903, 
is inquired for by his father, Adolph 
Munter, Spokane, Washington. 

John Hansen, who was lookoutman 
on the S.S. "Argyll" some months 
ago, is wanted by the Union Oil Co. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify the manager Marine 
Department, Mr. Walter G. Tubby, 

Anyone who was on the schooner 
"Americana" on January 29, when 
Louis Buttner was injured, is respect- 
fully requested to communicate with 
the injured man. Address Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 16C0 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^S.^^^N'V^^'^V^^^V^ 




AT 



JOHNSON'S 

2558 MISSION ST. 
San Francisco 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Johan Nilsen, a native of 
Sandefjord, Norway, aged about 33, 
left his home at 1164 Potrero Ave., 
Sunday, August 17th. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Coast Seamen's Journal. 




President Billingurst, in a message 
to the Peruvian Congress, appealed 
for a $33,000,000 loan. 

The site of the harbor of ancient 
Pompeii was discovered 1250 yards 
inland from the Italian coast. 

London physicians said that the 
tango dance was responsible for a 
new disease which they have named 
fallen stomach. 

Four spectators were beheaded by 
a runaway aeroplane at Buechenbeu- 
ren, Prussia. The two men in the 
machine escaped unhurt. 

At the closing session of the Zion- 
ist Congress in Vienna $100,000 was 
subscribed for the proposed Jewish 
university in Jerusalem. 

Two soldiers were killed and an- 
other Zeppelin airship narrowly es- 
caped destruction when the German 
military dirigible Z 5 ran away at 
Leipsic. 

The Carnegie commission for the 
investigation of the Balkan atrocities 
has definitely confessed the failure 
of its undertaking, according to a 
Berlin statement. 

Sir Oliver Lodge, in his presiden- 
tial address before the British Asso- 
ciation, argued for immortality, ex- 
pressing his conviction that per- 
sonality persisted beyond death. 

San Domingo revolutionists, it was 
reported, have seceded from the Gov- 
ernment and formed a new State. 

Asiatic cholera is spreading in Rus- 
sia. Eight provinces have been de- 
clared "infected." 

An American collector, supposed 
to be Henry C. Frick, has acquired 
for $100,000 an organ nearly 300 
years old, which is described as the 
finest instrument of its kind in the 
world. 

Madame Curie, co-discoverer of 
radium, declared that England should 
keep its eyes on Prof. Ernest Ruther- 
ford, whose experiments with radio- 
activity were likely soon to confer 
an inestimable boon on mankind. 

A workman in London, England, 
found on a sidewalk practically the 
entire pearl necklace, valued at $650,- 
000, which was stolen on July 16, 
while in transit by mail from Paris 
to London. His reward is said to be 
$50,000. 

The Vorwaerts, the organ of the 
German Social Democratic party, re- 
ports that the Socialist national com- 
mittee has elected Deputy Friedrich 
Ebert as party leader to succeed Au- 
gust Bebel who died at Zurich on 
August 13. 

The British Trade-Union Congress, 
recently in session, ordered that a 
wireless message of congratulation 
and good will be forwarded to Presi- 
dent Gompers. The following is the 
message: "British Trade-Union Con- 
gress heartily congratulates you upon 
recovery to health and return to 
business. Bowerman." 

A remarkable flight, establishing 
a cross-country record, was made by 
the French aviator, Ernest Guillaux. 
With a passenger he covered 118 
miles from his home at Savigny-sur- 
Braye to Paris, in fifty minutes. This 
was at the rate of nearly 142 miles 
an hour. Guillaux recently was 
awarded the single-day record of 
859)4 miles. 

British Indians in South Africa, 
who number 140,000, threaten a pass- 
ive strike for the redress of griev- 
ances, according to a Johannesburg 
dispatch. They declare that they are 
discriminated against by the immi- 
gration and local laws and propose 
to break the statutes. If arrests fol- 
low, it is asserted, the Indians will 
cease work. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Will Resume. — Mrs. Newrocks — 
Dear me. We must leave Paris to- 
morrow, and we are only up to page 
nineteen of the guide-book. 

Mr. Newrocks— Mark the place, 
and we'll come back next year and 
begin at page twenty. — Puck. 



The Easiest Way. — "How did Cal- 
kins get the right to stick that 
'Hon.' in front of his name? He 
never was in Congress, was he?" 

"No, but he once impersonated a 
member of Congress over the tele- 
pone." — Buffalo Express. 



Outclassed.— "Did she come to the 
door when you serenaded her with 
your mandolin?" 

"No; but another fellow came 
along and brought her out with an 
auto-horn."— Louisville Courier-Jour- 
nal. 



A Humane Mayor.— The mayor of 
a little commune in the Pyrenees 
has just issued the following decree: 
"Whereas the young people of the 
commune are wont to meet and 
dance every Sunday lifter mass, and 
the noise they make frightens the 
cocks, hens, and other animals of 
the village, and whereas the result is 
prejudicial to agriculture; we hereby 
prohibit dancing within the bounds 
of the commune during the hours in 
which the domestic animals take 
their repose." — Westminster Gazette. 



Enterprising.— The honest farmer 
who took in summer boarders greet- 
ed the new arrivals with truly rural 
enthusiasm. 

"I swan, I'm right deown glad to 
meet ye," he cried as he extended his 
horny hand. "Heow's th' folks to 
hum?" 

The man of the party looked at 
the enthusiast with some suspicion. 

"Farmer," he said, "your dialect 
strongly reminds me of the stage 
variety." 

The agriculturist grinned. 

"It's all right, ain't it?" he asked. 
"I gave an actor feller a month's 
board free to teach it to me." — 
Cleveland Plain Dealer. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth, 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Establlched 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL. 
(s under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modem appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-Informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts £ind Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 IVIARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer In 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN & CO. 

Baltimore ClotKin^ Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Demand the Union Label 



IIDUaLWniUIU,^B3B|. INTERIUnDIUL I UISIOIV 



Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 




"Nae Retail Center" 




Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^N^^^^^^^^^^^V^'^'^^^N^W^^^^^^ 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



«wV^^^^^^^^^^^^N^^^^/s^^^^^^^s^■^'s^^^^^^^^/^^^^^» 




Jt0S «ntf Jtmj.. 



Eyes Examined Free Repairing Our Specialty 

WE DO REPAIRING 
JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 Market Street., Near Call Building 

2593 Mission Street, Near 22nd Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

THE LARGEST JEWELRY STORE, WITH THE LARGEST 
STOCK AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

Has Moved from 610 THIRD ST. to 

693 THIRD ST., opposite the 

Southern Pacific Depot at 3d 

and Townsend Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Oooda, Hata, Caps, Trunlu, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boota, Shoes. Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Name 
and Number. 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



SI 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of th« International Seamen's Union of America. 




A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 


Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 




VOL. XXVII, No. 4. SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1913. 


Whole No. 2246. 





I 




NEW SAN FRANCISCO HOME 

of the 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific and the Alaska Fishermen's Union 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BY THE WAY. 



"Prohibition does not prohibit" wlien the 
thing prohibited is just an effect of a cause 
not touched at all. This should by now 
be patent even to so valiant windmill fight- 
ers as our good friends, the Prohibitionists. 
A large part of the territory of the United 
States already has so-called prohibition, 
yet our per capita consumption of liquors 
is steadily increasing. A demonstration 
like that would convince sane men that 
they were on the wrong track. But it is 
about as hard a proposition to make the 
average rock-ribbed Prohibitionist see the 
bottom cause of the drink evil as, according 
to Dr. Johnson, it is to get a joke into a 
Scotchman's head. He is so obsessed with 
the immediateness of the Demon Rum that 
he can not see, just behind it, its creator 
and keeper, the Demon Profit ; for it is as 
certain as anything capable of mathemati- 
cally exact demonstration can be, that if 
we eliminate all profits from the manufac- 
ture and sale of liquors, nine-tenths of the 
evils flowing from the liquor traffic would 
die natural deaths. The remaining tenth 
we could taper off on until the use of alco- 
holic beverages had been whittled down to 
an irreducible minimum. Wherefore, Mr. 
Prohibitionist, if you want to put the 
Demon Rum on the bum, you must first 
put the absolute, everlasting kibosh on the 
Demon Profit. Any political economist 
worth his salt can tell you how to do that. 
And there you are. Go to it. Put the 
skids under the profits of the liquor traffic, 
and watch the brewers, distillers and rum- 
sellers shrivel up like cockroaches on a red- 
hot shovel. 



The question of what to do with the 
night-blooming coryphees who are to be 
driven from San Francisco's "Barbary 
Coast" into the outer humdrum of respect- 
able ( !) society seems to fall well within 
the category of things which no fellow can 
find out. "They have become accustomed 
to such short hours and big wages," say 
the clubwomen, "that it will be practically 
impossible to furnish them with suitable 
employment in private life with its com- 
paratively long hours and small wages." 
It's a dilemma, all right. It also brings on 
another train of thoughts. What, for in- 
stance, becomes of those unfortunate legis- 
lators and other public servants whom 
Vox Populi in its periodical tantrums rele- 
gates to the obscurity of private life? Like 
the "Alice Smiths" of the "Barbary Coast," 
they have had such a soft thing in the mat- 
ter of hours and wages that the stern reali- 
ties of honest labor must strike them as 
simply terrible. Compared with questions 
of this magnitude, that other puzzle of the 
ages, What becomes of all the old pins? 
takes rank as the veriest pififle. Yes, breth- 
ren, the world is full of all kinds of queer 
problems and all kinds of queer guys wor- 
rying over 'em. 



Don't worry, jMr. Haut-Ton. Men will 
never be "reduced to a dead level" while 
Nature persists in making every man dif- 
ferent from every other man. But because 
Nature thus ordains it, that is no good 
reason why we should go above her head 
and create artificial inequalities among 
ourselves. This we do by conferring special 
privileges on some and depriving others of 
certain inalienable rights. And these things 
we stupidly do without the least regard to 



the natural inequalities of men. Which 
shows that we are at loggerheads with 
Nature. Which, in turn, shows that we are 
a precious lot of bumptious pinheads; for 
none but self-complacent fools would dare 
to take issue with Nature on anything 
whatsoever. Wherefore, if we would as- 
pire to wisdom, let us fall in with Nature's 
ways. Let us do away with all artificial 
inequalities among ourselves. Make of life 
"a fair field and no favors, and may the 
best man win." Then if any man gets to 
the front, he gets there because he is fit 
for a place in front. 



"As land values increase so must the 
number of homeless and landless increase. 
To them the census statistics on land values 
mean little short of a sentence to perpetual 
slavery." — The Dallas (Tex.) Democrat. 

Little by little the light is breaking 
through the denseness of popular ignorance 
on the subject of land values. Pretty soon 
there will be enough of it to show up pub- 
licly the man who holds land out of use 
for a rise in value for what he really is, 
the greatest curse of organized society 
everywhere. When that day arrives the 
owner of unused land and the rack-renting 
landlord will be classed by public opinion 
with the chattel slave-owners of ante-bel- 
lum memory. As a matter of fact, they 
are a great deal worse. Chattel slavery af- 
fected only a small part of us, but landlord- 
ism blights all of us. It's the tapeworm 
Inirrowing in the vitals of the body politic. 
General prosperity is impossible where 
landlordism is rampant. High land values 
is the meat whereon landlords feed and 
wax fat. And experience has everywhere 
shown that the higher the land values are 
the lower is the general standard, of living. 



A civilization grounded in the profit sys- 
tem will sanction any vileness that man or 
devil can frame up. For proof of this take 
a comprehensive view of our own civiliza- 
tion. If there is any conceivable deviltry 
not found in its repertory of sins, make a 
note of the omission and earn the standing 
reward offered for such discoveries by the 
Society of Exalted Scoffers and Cynics. 



A fellow there was ('twas not you nor I) 
who wanted to know — begob, he did so — 
"why life is so cheap with living so high !" 

El Tuerto. 



The continual protesting against the 
cruel, inhuman and unnatural employment 
of child labor in the Southern cotton mills 
is slowly but surely having its effect. Pub- 
lic sentiment, an element very slow to as- 
sert itself, is gradually waking up to a 
realization of the barbarousness of the 
practice, and will some of these days ex- 
press itself in such certain terms that the 
drops of childhood's blood will no longer 
be a part of the fabric made or the thread 
spun. The blighting of the brightness of 
childhood and the consequent stunting of 
manhood and womanhood will have be- 
come only a memory. It will take genera- 
tions, however, to blot from the mind's 
eye the cruel savagery of the past, and to 
build up a people with a normal mental 
and physical equipment which was so de- 
based by the feudal baron system that 
prospered while the public slept their sleep 
out, unmindful of the causes of the white 
and wan faces of the stunted little toilers 
they met from time to time on the streets. 
— Tobacco Worker. 



SINGLE TAX IN SWEDEN. 



The advance which the principles of 
Single Tax are making in the countries 
of Europe is nowhere more remarkable 
than in Sweden. In January last two pe-, 
titions relative to taxation were handed 
to the Swedish Minister of State and Fi- 
nance from members of the provincial 
legislatures. A few days later these peti- 
tions, accompanied by a memorial, were 
presented also the members of parlia- 
ment. This memorial is a model of clear 
and dignified 'reasoning that, taken in 
connection with the many representative 
names attached to the petitions, and the 
precise and unqualified terms of the lat- 
ter, shows in a most gratifying manner 
the strength and rapid advance of the 
Single Tax movement in the country. 
During the past four years it sets forth 
that: 

"Whereas customs house taxes, without 
exception, involve a great and obvious in- 
justice, i. c.. take from . some for the 
benefit of others, without giving any rea- 
sonable compensation ; whereas these taxes 
retard the development of the country's 
trade, shipping and other more primary in- 
dustries ; whereas, on the other hand, they 
largely facilitate the development of 
tru.sts and trade combinations, resulting 
in the prevailing high cost of living, while 
being, in general, a hindrance to the so- 
lution of the social questions; therefore, 
the undersigned, members of Landsting, 
wish to declare that the customs house 
taxes must very soon, and in the shortest 
possible transition period, be entirely re- 
pealed. And we hereby make an earnest 
appeal to the liberal parties to work with 
all their power for this object, as re- 
quired alike by justice and the common 
welfare. This labor should be forwarded 
by an official examination into the best 
modes of preparing substitute taxes or 
dues which, while preventing idle land- 
holding, manipulation and socially pur- 
poseless monopolizing, shall encourage 
and aid the country's productive forces." 

The petition on the land values question 
ran as follows : 

"The undersigned, members of Land- 
sting, do hereby express their approval 
of the efforts which have been made for 
bringing about an investigation of the 
land value taxation system, in the direc- 
tion which during the last Riksdag was 
proposed in the second chamber by motion 
of Mayor Carl Lindhagen. We hold it to 
be of great importance that this mode of 
taxation, too, should be an object of ex- 
amination in connection with the pending 
readjustment of our communal tax sys- 
tem. We will therefore state as our de- 
sire that the government as early as pos- 
sible take the measures necessary to ob- 
tain clearness of view regarding the ef- 
fects of what is called land value taxa- 
tion." — Vancouver World. 



The knockers and kickers are not the 
men who spend their money and time to 
sustain the cause of labor. 



Union men and women can materially 
assist the cause by demanding the label 
on the products they consume. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Union Accomplishments. 

In the last issue of the El Paso labor 
paper, The Texas Union, there is given a 
resume of the accomplishments of the Cen- 
tral Labor Union in the four years of its 
existence. The achievements are as fol- 
lows : The Barbers' Union has shortened 
the hours for its members, its membership 
has doubled, and many members have been 
assisted during sickness. The Bartenders' 
Union and the Butchers' Union have been 
organized, each with a large membership, 
and have been exceedingly fortunate in se- 
curing betterments. The Blacksmiths' Un- 
ion and the Boilermakers' Union have in- 
creased the wages of their members in a 
substantial manner, notwithstanding the 
fact that many in the two trades named 
have been on a two years' strike against the 
Harriman system. The Brewery Workers' 
Union, after a serious strike, secured a 
satisfactory settlement, and during the time 
mentioned above their wages have been in- 
creased on three different occasions. The 
Bricklayers' Union increased the wages of 
its members $1 per day, together with se- 
curing the Saturday half holiday. The 
Carpenters' Union has grown from forty- 
five members to approximately 300, and 
while its members received $3 and $3.50 
for a nine-hour day at the beginning of 
the period under consideration, now they 
are receiving $5 for an eight-hour day and 
have a Saturday half holiday. This is but 
the story of achievement that is being made 
in every city, village, and hamlet where 
workmen maintain their unions. 



Farmers Lucky. 

A publishing concern which puts out 
several agricultural papers, has just issued 
a statement, reported to be based upon 
the latest crop report, that the agricultural 
products of 1913 show a decrease of 22 
per cent, over 1912, but that the year's 
gross revenue for the farmers will be 6 per 
cent, more than last year. The article 
states that the reason for this extraordi- 
nary condition is the high prices per unit 
for several of the large cereal crops. Corn, 
for example, will show a total volume of 
29 per cent, under that of 1912, but with 
a value of 42 per cent, greater. Speaking 
of the cotton crop, it says : "Although 
nearly a million bales less than last year, a 
decrease of 5 per cent., its price of around 
14 cents per pound to the planter will make 
the cotton crop worth the unprecedented 
aggregate of $950,000,000. In other words, 
the cotton growers will receive a total of 
around $125,000,000 more than last year, or 
a total increase of 22 per cent. This will 
be the greatest amount ever paid to plant- 
ers in the history of the cotton industry." 



Pearl Button Workers Win. 

After a bitter struggle lasting twenty 
weeks, the pearl button workers of New 
York, who were on strike for a shorter 
workday, an increase in wages and recog- 
nition of their union, won all their de- 
mands, the outstanding bosses yielding 
after a lengthy conference. As a result, 
800 workers have returned to work, 700 of 
the 1,500 originally involved having pre- 
viously made settlements with their bosses. 



Four representatives of the organization, 
the Pearl Button Workers' Union, Local 
14077, of the A. F. of L., were in confer- 
ence with the bosses several hours before 
the settlement was reached. The A. F. of 
L. financed the lengthy struggle. Only 
one boss, employing twelve workers, re- 
fused to yield, and the strike will continue 
at his place. P. F. Duffy, the A. F. of L. 
organizer, who has been prominent in the 
fight, declared recently: "The settlement is 
a clean-cut victory for the workers. It has 
taught the bosses a lesson in that they can 
not beat a mass of strongly organized in- 
sistent workers. The organization has been 
materially strengthened by the strike. The 
workers stuck together valiantly." The 
victorious workers will only work nine 
hours per day hereafter instead of the ten 
and twelve hours, as before, and they will 
get increases in wages varying from 10 to 
20 per cent. The bosses have agreed to 
recognize the union. 



The Men Should Win. 
In a communication addressed to Secre- 
tary Morrison by John B. Lennon, Treas- 
urer of the American Federation of Labor, 
the following comments are made on the 
situation as he sees it : "Our meeting was 
a great success. The miners are in excel- 
lent humor and maintain the best of order 
under a mighty severe strain from the de- 
tectives and rriilitia. The men ought to 
win, as the industry is really tied up. Em- 
ployers, however, refuse to meet with any 
one representing the strikers to talk over 
the situation. If they continue to main- 
tain that attitude, the fight will be con- 
tinued all winter, and the strikers will re- 
quire much help. Moyer and Monahan are 
both here and appear to have great in- 
fluence with the strikers, being apparently 
capable and careful fighters. The situa- 
tion, in fact, at this time looks good." Gov- 
ernor Ferris held a two hours' conference 
with Attorney General Fellows and other 
State officials, and a representative appear- 
ing in behalf of the miners. At the con- 
clusion of the conference the Governor and 
head of the State Railroad Commission 
took up the matter of arbitration with rep- 
resentatives of the company, as a plan had 
been devised which it was thought might 
lead up to an arbitration and result in set- 
tlement of the strike. The plan agreed 
upon, it is said, will result in the with- 
drawal of the Western Federation of Mi- 
ners from the controversy. That the man- 
agers of the copper companies should re- 
quest the strikers to return to work and 
that then the Governor appoint a board of 
arbitration to investigate the grievances 
of the strikers, leaving the three points of 
difference, namely, an eight-hour day, in- 
creased wages, and the placing of two men 
on a machine instead of one to be dis- 
posed of by arbitration. On submission 
of this proposition to Allen F. Rees, attor- 
ney for the mine owners, he telegraphed the 
Governor, as follows : "Can not act along 
lines of your telegram, because of condi- 
tions which seem to make it impossible." 
By the rejection of these overtures it would 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

[A complete list of unions afifiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards Association of 
New Zealand, W^ellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 
Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 
Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundct, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 
Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzcllino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicadc de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Coclneros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Tngla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritime dos Empregados cm Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Tlic total number of claims to un- 
employment benefit made at Labor 
Exchanges and other local offices 
of the Unemployment Fund in Great 
Britain during the four weeks ended 
July 25, 1913, was 68,806. During 
the four weeks ended June 27 the 
total was 68,058. 

Returns relating to unemployment 
in June were received by the Dutch 
Government Statistical Office from 
trade unions and municipal unemploy- 
ment funds with a total membership 
of 63,968. The percentage of mem- 
bers out of work during the month 
was 3.9, as compared with 4.2 in the 
preceding month and 2.9 in June, 
1912. 

At its recent annual session the 
British Trade Union Congress elect- 
ed I. H. Gwynne, of the Tin and 
Sheet Millmen's Society, and T. 
Greenall, of the Miners' Federation 
of Great Britain, as fraternal dele- 
gates to the coming convention of 
the American Federation of Labor, 
which will be held in Seattle this 
year. 

Eight cases of recourses to the law 
of 1892 on conciliation and arbitra- 
tion were reported to the French 
Labor Department during June, the 
initiative being taken in two cases 
by the work people, in one case by 
the parties jointly, and in 5 cases 
by a Justice of the Peace. In two 
cases the employers declined to take 
part in conciliation proceedings, 
while in six cases conciliation com- 
mittees were formed, resulting in the 
settlement of five disputes. 

The average number of days 
worked per week by persons em- 
ployed underground in coal mines of 
France during June was 5.97, as com- 
pared with 6.0 in the previous month, 
and 5.98 in June, 1912. Taking sur- 
face and underground workers to- 
gether, 91.8 per cent, worked full 
time (six days or over per week), 
and 7.95 per cent, from 5 to 6 days. 
In the previous month the corre- 
sponding percentages were 94.5 and 
5.5, and in June, 1912, 94.07 and 
5.90. 

All emigrants landing in Canada 
between March 1 and October 31 
must possess $25 (£5 4s.), and chil- 
dren $12.50 (£2 12s.) each, and 
double these sums in the winter, 
and sufficient traveling money, ex- 
cept that the following need have 
sufficient traveling money only: (1) 
b'arm laborers and female servants, 
if going to assured employment as 
such; (2) certain relatives of resi- 
dents in Canada. It is said that 
owing to the over-supply of me- 
chanics and laborers in the West 
these restrictive regulations are be- 
ing rigidly enforced. 

It is reported that the Brazilian 
Government has recently treated all 
workers associating themselves with 
the trade-union movement most des- 
potically and brutally. The reason 
for same may be found in a dockers' 
strike which took place at Santos 
and which passed off peacefully. 
After the strike four Spaniards were 
arrested and deported without any 
offense having been proved against 
them. Twenty-eight Spanish work- 
ers are languishing in prison at Rio 
de Janeiro, transportation awaiting 
them also. The Government de- 
scribes them as "disturbers of the 
peace," as "dangerous anarchists," 
and uses such expressions as an ex- 
cuse for the most shameful persecu- 
tions of the workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... gAN PEDRO 



M. BROWIN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

427 RROrST STREET SAIN PEDRO 



S. G. SWANSON 

^Se best T"}l^j5^ TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to Postoffice, 
Los Angeles "Waterfront" 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Kasper Olsen, a native of Fredrik- 
stad, Norway, age about 25, is in- 
quired for. Address Christ Hansen, 
Port Ludlow, Wash. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 



WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

W« Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

812 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Gal. 

Dealer- In 
CIQARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam L.aundry 

ALEX. KANE C. A. BRUCE 

WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

Don't forget the 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Andor.son, Gust Kinnar, K. 

Anderson, W. -1630 Kashlulin. Frank 

Annell, Albert Larsiii. A. B. 

Anderson, Ernst I.ar.Sfii. Axel, -1768 
Anderson, HenimindL. Edward 

Anderson, Patrick l.indholm, Erik A. 

Anderson, Soren Lass, John 

Aloxanderscn. Paul Lovgreen, Otto 

Anderson, U. K., I>auritson, George 

-1762 I.undberff, Carl 

Ahlslroni, Anders Lindroth, Gustaf 

Andersen, K. P., Ui.ssfn. .lohan 

-1717 Leino, G. F. 
Anderson, Ed., -1739Lewis, George 

Anderson, George, Lindeberg. Ernest 

-1H12 Lemke, Richard 

Andirson. Mr. Lewet, Frenohie 

Rerncit, Hugo Linderman. Gust 

Bchrsin, Jacob Lister, W. 

Bergh, Borge Loinlng. Herman 

Benson, Helge Mayer, W. 

Berhus, Emil Maklnen, Oskar 

Buchtman, F. Maatta, John 

Blakstad, Ed. Moulas. Nick 

Cristensen, H. Merleult. Gaston 

-1366 Miller. John 

Carlsson, Aksel Makele. Gustav W. 

-1'220 Moureau, H. 

Carlson, Gust. W. Mayers. P. M. 

Carlson, Gustaf Mikkelsen, Harald 

Collins. B. F. Nflsen, .lulius 

Dean, J. Noiniimii. John E. 

Dreger, Jack Nelson, Hans 

Erdt. Anton Olsen, W. 

Ekholm, F. Olsen, Sckutar 

Eriksson, C. -333 Owen, Fred 

Farrell, Henry Olsen, Marius 

Flebe, Fritz Olsen. Olav 

Falbom, Richard Ostorbcrg. John 

Grantley. Mr. Pomaret, Leotard 

(iusck, Bernhard Pedersen, A.. -1564 

Hunt, Gust. Petersen, Aage 

Halvorsen, H., 2229 Peterson, 'loin 

Ilimsen, Nils. -989 Pedersen, Peder 

Ilannus, Alex Phillips, K. 

Hokonsson. Axel Pekman. Ernest 

llan.sen. Peter Repson, E. 

Hjorili. Knut Rantman, Robert 

Hausnian, Mr. Rudowitz. H. 

Iliinsen. C. Rigiiell, J. V. 

Mass, James Saarine, Hemming 

Hansen, Herald Sdirocder, Ernst 

Hansen, Johannes Stephan, M. 

Ilelenius, Oskar Sanders, Charles 

Ilintza, Yrjo Spieler, Albert 

Ivitsen, Ivar Silvers. Herman 

.Kn.stn, Jens B. Sclionke. Frank 

Johnson, George Sievers, G. P. 

Jorgensen, Jorgen Thorsen, Joe 

Jones. Eddie Torgersen, .\nton 

.lohnson, Gunnar Thomsen, Th. 

Johnson, II.. -221.'? Waaland, Lewis 

Johansen, Halvard Wilson. A. 

Jorgensen, Fred Warkala. J. 

Jensen. Jens B. Zorning. Arthur 
Johansson, Fritz W. Packages and 

Jonasson, O. M. Photos. 

Johansen, Walter Larsen, Jaines Chr. 

Kramer, Otto Nordman, Joiin 



Honolulu, H. T. 



This is to certify that on the 27th 
day of February, 1911, one Mathias 
Lagman, then nineteen years of age, 
was a seaman on board the S. S. 
"Paloma," Cuban flag; that when said 
vessel was lying at anchor in the 
Port of Cabarian, P. R., at about 8 
o'clock in the evening, Lagman, who 
had been working with other men at 
painting, was walking between decks 
in the dark, when he fell through 
hatch No. 4, which had been left un- 
covered. He was picked up in the 
hold and it was found that he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. This 
young man was subsequently taken 
to Russia, where his mother, who is 
very poor, is taking care of him. 

It is believed that the owners were 
negligent in failing to have the hatch 
covered, and in failing to have or 
furnish proper lighting for the 'tween 
decks at the point where Lagman 
fell. If these facts can be proven, 
some relief might be obtained for this 
unfortunate boy. 

The following- are the men who 
signed on the articles with Lagman, 
and who had been working with said 
Lagman: 

C. Jones, C. J. Johnson, F. Johan, 
M. Lanhard, E. Randal, W. Paulson. 

Any seaman who will locate these 
men or send their addresses to the 
Legal Aid Society, No. 1 Broadway, 
New York City, will be doing a 
great favor to said sailor, and to 
S. B. Axtell, attorney-in-charge. 

For similar reasons we desire to 
communicate with the following men 
who were members of the crew of 
the "Lyman M. Law" in October. 
1911, when Edward S. Tennberg was 
severely injured on the trip between 
Boston and Norfolk; 

Adolph Dittmer, John Olson, Har- 
old Herman, Charles Newberg, James 
J. Kelly. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 
Light and ventilation perfect. 
Cool and pleasant at all seasons. 



CIGARS TOBACCO SOFT DRINKS 

INFORMATION WANTED. 
Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 2i, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address 
Henry Thomas (No. SSO). Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Adolf Theining, a native of Van- 
nersborg, Sweden, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Walter Jorgesen Clang, born in 
Aaland Yetta, Ostro Yetta, is in- 
quired for by his uncle, John Clang. 
.'\ddress Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Enoch Joseph Horsfold, 18 years 
old, native of New Zealand, please 
communicate with Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

NOTICE. 

Any sailor or fireman having bag- 
gaae stored with John Krehmke, 407 
Drumm St., will please call on Mrs. 
John Krehmke, 1209 Central Ave., 
Alameda. Baggage to be kept 60 
days from to-day, then sold to de- 
fray expenses. 

MRS. JOHN KREHMKE, 

1209 Central Ave. (Martin Station), 
Alameda. 



H. 
E. 
C. E. 

E. K. 
A. 



-Vlbrect, Chas. 
.\ndersen, W. 
Andersen, M. C. 
Andowety, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Berthele, M. 
Baker, M. 
Bode, W. 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, A. 
Christensen, A. 
Clausen, J. 
Colbert, M. J. 
Douglas, G. A. 
IClsiston, C. J. 
Elilert, An. 
E.iton, Neva I. 
Glaaormither, C. 
Gordon, James 
Hansen, Pet. 
Haralsen, W. 
Hanson, Jorg. 
Hansen, Christ. 
Haven, Francis 
Hevaroso, H. B. 
Hapstad, Sigurd 
Irwin, Robert 
Ivans, Carl 
Trike. Willie 
Jensen, Hans 



Karlson, Hans 
Karlsen, Oskar 
Kjassgaard, Hans 
Langer, Robert 
Laymbrag, H. 
Llntianen. Ernest 
Lindberg. T. 
Ludwigsen, Arne 
Marx, Albert 
Machado, H. 
Mafo, E. S. 
Methenen, E. K. 
Olander, Carl 
Olsen, J. H. 
Person, Edmond 
Pitschkun, W. 
Pelusan, D. E. 
Russell, W. 
Relnlnk, H. 
Rasmundsen. G. 
Silhus, W. 
Slan. C. 
Schiff. Ch. 
Sorensen, E. 
Suvert, H. 
Sjablom. G. 
Stenars, A. W. 
Salversen, S. 
Schates, A. 
Vilvot. J. 
Williamson. R. A. 
Zornow, Herbert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Albert Christensen, native of By- 
rum Laso, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco in 1910, is inqiiired for by his 
brother. Address, H. C. Christensen, 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home, San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887. is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



George H. Pierce, master of the U. S. trans- 
port "Dix," died suddenly August 25 of heart 
disease while the vessel was bound from Manila 
to Japan. 

James Knox, U. S. Shippmg Commissioner at 
Tacoma, has received an official request from 
Washington for his resignation. Mr. Knox was 
appointed by President McKinley in July, 1900. 

It was announced that the Yale and Harvard, 
steamers of the Pacific Navigation Company, will 
dock hereafter at Redondo Beach. They will 
discontinue using San Pedro, it was said, on ac- 
count of the arbitrary speed limit iff that port. 

Captain F. M. Dunwoody, senior captain of 
the United States Revenue Cutter Service, with 
headquarters at Port Townsend, has removed his 
headquarters to Seattle and with this office all 
branches of the Customs service for the Wash- 
ington district will be assembled in Seattle. 

Six members of the crew of the steamer "City 
of Sydney," five of whom are charged with lar- 
ceny on the high seas for broaching cargo and 
mail baskets on board the steamer, and one with 
smuggling at this port, were arrested at San 
Francisco on Federal warrants. 

The Pacific Mail liner "Newport," which was 
sunk at Ancon and subsequently raised again, 
has been undergoing repairs at the Union Iron 
Works. The vessel will once again enter the 
field of usefulness within a month. The repairs 
will have cost in the neighborhood of $215,000 
and are rapidly moving to completion. 

Herr R. Blohm, of the Hamburg shipbuilding 
firm of Blohm & Voss, is at present visiting 
the more important harbors of the Pacific Coast, 
in connection with the projected establishment 
of a local branch of the Hamburg company on 
the opening of the Panama Canal. It would 
serve in the first place as a repair yard for the 
new coasting steamers of the Hamburg-Amer- 
ican line. 

At present there are five submarine bells in 
operation on the various American lightships 
on the Pacific. The latest to be installed was 
on the gas buoy at Cape Blanco. Among the 
vessels equipped with the submarine signal ap- 
paratus are those of the American-Hawaiian 
Company, the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, 
the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, the Matson Navigation 
Company and the Pacific Mail Company. 

The Chilean government contemplates a heavy 
increase in the import duty on lumber. It is 
claimed that the duty will be absolutely prohibi- 
tive and involve a loss to Pacific lumber mer- 
chants of close on $1,000,000 a year or a failure 
to dispose of 98 per cent, of the fir lumber at 
present shipped from the Pacific Coast to Chile. 
During 1912 the lumber exports of Chile from 
the United States were valued at $912,076, with 
indications of a healthy increase. 

A survey is being made in order to determine 
officially the location of the rock which caused 
the loss of the "State of California." Captain 
Thomas H. Cann, Jr., master of the ill-fated ves- 
sel, and three divers who examined the rock, de- 
clare it is in the middle of a channel marked 
as clear water on the Government charts now 
in use. The reef is about 100 feet square, with 
six or seven sharp pinnacles, several of which 
are only three fathoms from the water level at 
low tide. 

Col. A. W. Yate.s, U. S. Quartermaster De- 
partment, has awarded a contract to the E. J. 
Dod.ge Lumber Co., Portland, for the transporta- 
tion of 3,125,000 feet of Oregon fir from the 
Columbia River to Pearl Harbor, Hawaiian Is- 
lands, at a rate of $6.40 per thousand. It was 
the lowest bid. A contract for furnishing a 
similar cargo previously had been awardeci to 
the F. _S. Loop Lumber Co. The lumber will 
be carried to Pearl Harbor by the steamer "St. 
Helens" in two trips. 

The steamers "Governor" and "President" will 
be converted into oil-burners as soon as the 
new liner "Congress" has taken her place in the 
service between San Diego, San Francisco and 
Puget Sound. The "Governor" is expected to 
be converted first and will be followed by the 
"President." The installation of oil burners in 
the "President" and "Governor" is primarily to 
allow more room for cargo. Neither of the ves- 
sels can at present carry enough coal for a 
round trip voyage and cargo space must be 
utilized for coal. 

The power schooner Wasp was wrecked on 
.August 25 off the mouth of the Kuskokwim river 
in Alaska. She left Good News bay, south of the 
Kuskokwim, on August 24. The next day she met 
with a heavy gale and was driven upon a rock, 
which stove a hole in her hull. The six men who 
were on board launched a dory and set out to 
row to St. Michael. For five days they were 
in the small boat without food or water, and 
they were nearly dead when they arrived at 
St. Michael yesterday. Besides Captain Charles 
Knudson and his crew of three there were on 
the Wasp A. N. Evans, Commissionei' of Educa- 
tion for Alaska, and Frank Wraskey, former Del- 
egate to Congress and now a trader at Seamtnon 
bay, Yukon delta. 

For a consideration of $550,000 the floating 
dry dock of J. T. Hefifernan has been sold to 



the Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Com- 
pany. The big dock, which was built twenty 
years ago at Port Hadlock, is 385 feet long and 
100 feet wide and has a capacity for vessels up 
to 8000 tons. The ground on which Hefifer- 
nan's ship building and repair plant is located 
at the head of the east waterway was recently 
acquired by the Seattle Port Commission for 
$440,000 and will be used for the new overseas 
terminals. This purchase gives the Seattle Con- 
struction and Dry Dock Company a total of 
three dry docks and a marine railway, including 
its original wooden dock and a $500,000 steel 
dock just put into commission. 

The barkentine Amaranth has been wrecked 
on Jarvis island, near the place where the long 
missing schooner Americana, also of San Fran- 
cisco, drove ashore. It is stated that Captain 
Nielsen, who was accompanied by his wife, and 
the members of the crew are safe at Tutuila 
and will come home by steamer. The Ama- 
ranth was bound from Newcastle for San Fran- 
cisco with a cargo of coal. It is presumed that 
she went ashore early in the passage from Aus- 
tralia. The Amaranth's cargo was consigned to 
Hind, Rolph & Co. N. Andrews of San Fran- 
cisco is listed as the managing owner of the 
vessel, which was of 1109 gross tons, 209 feet 
long, 42 feet beam and 18 feet deep. She was 
built at Benicia in 1901. 

Disaster has placed a temporary blockade on 
the plans of the Union Steamship Company for 
a new cargo service between Australia and San 
Francisco. Cable advices state that the steamer 
Tyrone, which was to follow the Canada Cape, 
now on the way, may be a total loss off Ota.go 
heads, near Dunedin. The Tyrone, which came 
out from Liverpool and was bound for Sydney 
via Melbourne, was to have left the former port 
in October for San Francisco laden with a heavy 
cargo of frozen meats and general freight. The 
advices stated that it was feared in shipping 
circles that the steamer would be an absolute 
loss because of her dangerous position on the 
rocks. The Canada Cape, first of the frei.ghters 
to come here in the new Union service was laden 
with the largest cargo of frozen beef and mutton 
ever sent in this direction. A part cargo of the 
cold storage product is consigned to this port, 
while most of it goes to British Columbia. 

It is reported that Harry Olsen, known as the 
typhoid king, whose case is comparable to "Ty- 
phoid Mary" of New York fame, is to remain in 
the Federal Marine Hospital in San Francisco for 
an indefinite period, until proper arrangements 
for his disposal are made by agreement be- 
tween the State Board of Health of California 
and the United States authorities. This is the 
result of a conference between Dr. W. F. Snow, 
secretary of the California State Board of 
Health, and Dr. Rupert Blue, surgeon-genera! 
of the Federal service, held recently in Wash- 
ington and from which Dr. Snow just re- 
turned. .According to the health authorities, 
Olsen has been resonsible for thirty-three or 
thirty-four cases of typhoid^ of which four or 
five have resulted in death. Under the exist- 
ing laws, the Feder<Tl authorities have no 
provision for taking care of extraordinary cases 
such as his presents, and neither is there statu- 
torj' provision for the maintenance of a hospi- 
tal bv the California State Board of Health 
to take care of such an emergency. 

A cable dispatch received from Sydney, Aus- 
tralia, says that the American schooner Amer- 
icana, which cleared from the Columbia river 
March 3 and wdiich has been posted as missing 
by Lloyd's is a wreck on the coast of Jervis 
island. The crew of the Americana, under com- 
mand of Captain Charles Johnson, are safe at 
Samoa and will return to the United States by 
the next steamer. The Americana is breaking 
up under the severe battering of the stormy seas 
that prevail in the South Pacific and is a total 
loss. The crew of nine men took to the small 
boats and rowed 1400 miles to Samoa, suffering 
.great privations. When the men reached Samoa 
they were in a state of collapse from exhaustion 
and the hardships they had endured. The 
Americana, a steel vessel of 839 net tons, sailed 
from Astoria. Or., with a cargo of 948,000 feet 
of lumber. She was built in 1892 at Grange- 
mouth, Scotland, and was owned by the Charles 
Nelson Company. Mrs. Charles Johnson, wife 
of the captain of the Americana, who lives at 
4126 Twentieth street, San Francisco, received 
the news of the escape of her husband and his 
crew with great joy. Mrs. Johnson said that 
she had not given up hope, although the Amer- 
icana had been posted as missin.g, and practically 
all shipping men gave the vessel and her crew 
up as lost. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange BIdg., Third Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Telephone, Kearnv 394; 

(Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
1%A Lewis St., Bo-ston, Mass. 

Branches: 
NEW YORK CITY, 40 South St. 
NEW ORLEANS, Ln., 10.-,4 Magazine St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Telephone 1879 
Telephone 515» 



Headquarters: 

NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St 

Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala,, 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, m., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. T.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, C, 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. T., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT. Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St.. East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. T., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. T., 71 Main St. 

Branches; 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2296. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O.. 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 East Woodbrldge St. 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. T., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY. Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 84 Embarcadero. 

Branches: 
VICTORIA, B. C, Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER, B. C, Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmulr, P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North SOth St. 

SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 
Branches: 

SEATTLE. Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 
SAN PEDRO. Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 
(Continued on Pa«e 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAl'L SCHARUENBERG Editor 

I. M. }101/r Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montlis - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Chango.s in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of eacii week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco PostofUce as second- 
class matter. 



Headqimrters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
84 Embarcadero, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOfRNAI.,, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 1913. 



OUR NEW HOME. 



For many years the organized seafarers 
and fishermen of the Pacific Coast, who 
make their home in San Francisco, have 
looked forward to the day when their 
unions may occupy a home of their own. 
The half-tone on the first page of this is- 
sue shows far better than mere words that 
the hopes and dreams of seamen and fisher- 
men in this vicinity are about to be realized, 
in a most substantial manner. 

Excavating work for the construction of 
a three story, steel frame building on the 
lot recently purchased by the Maritime Hall 
.\ssociation has actually commenced. The 
lot is located on Clay street, 150 feet east 
of Drumm street, extending through to 
Commercial street — the lot being 50 by 119 
feet 6 inches. 

The building will be erected upon a pile 
foundation and have a heavy basement con- 
struction which will be diaphragmed water 
proofed, the party walls being of rein- 
forced concrete and the street fronts in 
brick. 

Both street frontages will be built up of 
the finest materials, using granite, glazed 
polychrome terra cotta and ivory enameled 
pressed brick. Over each of the main en- 
trances will be placed a graded mosaic, 
colored panel depicting Neptune and his tri- 
dent, etc. 

The first story will have plate and prismatic 
glass fronts and be leased out for commer- 
cial purposes. The second and third stories 
of the building will contain the offices of the 
Maritime Unions and also the required meet- 
ing rooms, library and recreation rooms. 

The interior corridor fini.sh will be in mar- 
ble terrazzo, with marble margins and base. 
The floors as well as the base in the main 
library and reading rooms and in the meet- 
ing halls will be of Magnesite composition. 
The wood finish will be in oak and selected 
pine, finished in fumed and natural tones. 

The main meeting hall will be decorated 
and finished in ornamental plaster, in allegor- 
ical designs. 

Every detail has been worked out with the 



greatest care and the building committee 
spent several weeks in examining the most 
modern buildings of San Francisco in order 
to incorporate in the specifications for this 
structure the very best materials in the line 
of finish and fixtures. 

The property is owned jointly by the Sail- 
ors' Union of the Pacific and the Alaska 
Fishermen's Union. Neither of these organi- 
zations is incorporated under the laws of the 
State and it therefore became necessary to or- 
ganize the Maritime Hall .'\ssociation, com- 
posed of .five members elected by the Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific and five members from 
the Alaska Fishermen's Union. 

I-^ollowing are the men who represent the 
two unions on the Maritime Hall .\ssociation: 
From the Alaska Fishermen's Union, I. N. 
Hylen, Charles F. Hammarin, Chris. Peter- 
sen, John Greenway and IMartin Johnsen ; 
from the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, Ed. 
Andersen. E. A. Erick.son, Walter Macarthur. 
John H. Tennison and Frank Johnson. 

The architects, Messrs. Chas. Paff & Co., 
who designed the building have drawn the 
plans for many of San Francisco's most hand- 
some and up-to-date structures. 

Mr. E. F. Burke was awarded the contract 
and, as stated, the dirt is already flying in 
healthy clouds and everything is being done 
to bring the building to an early completion. 

The members of the Maritime Hall As- 
sociation are entitled to much credit for faith- 
ful services already rendered and no one 
doubts that the building when completed will 
be a credit to them and to every member of 
the two unions. 

The lot was purchased and paid for some 
time ago for $44,000. The contract price of 
the building complete in every respect is $57.- 
750. And the entire amount is available in 
the treasuries of the two unions. 

When the building is completed everything 
in connection therewith will have been paid 
for in full. There will be no mortgage, no 
bonds or any outstanding obligations of any 
nature whatsoever. 

Here's luck to the architect, the contractor, 
and the union building trades mechanics who 
will erect our new home! 



UNION DOMINATION VS. SAFETY. 



At last we have been told definitely what 
is causing all those disastrous wrecks on the 
railroads. We used to think that the awful 
sacrifice of life on certain railroads was due 
to frenzied finance. We had been led to be- 
lieve also that the old wooden cars were 
somewhat to blame for the heavy loss of 
life in the collisions which seem to be "just 
happening" with an uncanny regularity. 

Now it appears, however, that the average 
man's guess upon the underlying reasons for 
these calamities was away off the mark. The 
"respectable" press has just discovered the 
real nigger in the woodpile. It is labor-union 
domination that has caused all these wrecks. 
It is labor-union domination that caused 
those ancient wooden passenger coaches to 
crumble and incinerate the helpless victims 
in the ruins of each succeeding smash-up. 

Who would have thought it? After stri- 
king and struggling for safety ever since 
their inception, the labor unions are now ac- 
cused of framing and formulating rules that 
cause death and disaster. 

If the labor unions have accomplished any- 
thing at all, they have surely led in estab- 
lishing safeguards for the prevention of ac- 
cidents. Wherever it has been possible to 



compare the number of accidents in a union- 
ized mine, factory or workshop of any de- 
scription with the roll of accidents in a sim- 
ilar plant employing unorganized labor, the 
figures proved that the employment of organ- 
ized labor invariably meant greater safety for 
employes and the public. 

Union domination in the transportation in- 
dustry has reduced the excessive hours of 
toil of employes ; it has insisted that a 
sufficient number of experienced and com- 
petent men shall be employed on each train 
and .ship, thus insuring better service and 
greater safety for all. 

Union domination of barber shops, bake- 
shops, breweries, etc., has done more to pro- 
tect the public health, by insisting upon proper 
sanitary conditions, than all other reform 
agencies combined. 

Union domination of mines has saved thou- 
sands of lives by insisting upon proper pre- 
caution in handling powder, etc. 

The advantages of union domination in 
any given industry to the people generally 
are so manifold that it seems needless to 
continue the enumeration. But perhaps it 
is not altogether inappropriate at this stage 
to dwell upon the alleged superior merits of 
dollar domination. 

Dollar domination of an industry stands 
for "the people be damned" policy. In the 
dollar dominated industry the sign of the $ 
is the fetish which all are expected to wor- 
ship — from general manager down to office 
boy. Safety must invariably take a back seat 
when dividends are the first and main con- 
sideration. 

Dollar domination locked the factory doors 
and was responsible for that awful sacrifice 
of lives in those holocausts which have taken 
place recently in the East. 

Dollar domination loads the modern ocean 
liner to the gunwales with human freight, 
but does not provide her with an efficient or 
sufficient crew to take care of the precious 
cargo in case of emergency. 

Dollar domination has killed and maimed 
more innocent men, women and children in 
the industries of this country than the total 
number of lives that were sacrificed in the 
Civil War and all other wars of this nation 
combined. 

The case of the editorial writer who com- 
plains about union domination of the rail- 
roads is a sad one — for ere long he will find 
himself minus a job. Call it unrest or any- 
thing we may choose — the people are going 
to put an end to the private exploitation of 
public utilities, and particularly to the private 
mismanagement of our modes of transporta- 
tion. They are just now trying it out on 
street-cars, and the operation of street-cars 
by the people, solely for the convenience and 
comfort of the people, is proving decidedly 
popular out West. And the successful ex- 
periments of this nature clearly foreshadow 
the doom of dollar domination in general. 



The tendency of trade unions, as of 
other bodies of men, to act upon senti- 
ment rather than reason, would be more 
dangerous than it is, were it not for the 
intervention of that strongest of all forces, 
instinct. 



Where the respective limits of any given 
trade are recognized there is no room 
for dispute regarding the jurisdiction of 
each. Any dispute that does occur in such 
case may be safely referred to extraneous 
causes. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



FIREMEN NOMINATE OFFICERS. 



At the last regular meeting of the Marine 
Firemen, Oilers and Watertenders' Union 
of the Pacific the following were nominated 
as officers for the year 1914: 

President, William Davock ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Albert P. Costello ; Financial Secretary 
and Business Agent, Patrick Flynn ; Record- 
ing Secretary, John Keville ; Treasurer, An- 
drew Pryal ; Directors (five to be elected), 
David Walker, Frank Burke, Walter Hogan, 
A. Tye, W. Schmidt, W. Wenzel, Leo Strand 
and A. Kennedy; First Patrolman, C. J. 
Harrington ; Second Patrolman, John T. 
Clark; Janitor at Headquarters, James Gal- 
lagher ; Seattle Agent, John Carney ; Seattle 
Patrolman. John M. Lyons and Edward 
Drennon ; San Pedro Agent, William Mee- 
han ; Portland Agent, Thomas Farrell and 
Richard Fuhrmann ; Delegates to the con- 
vention of the International Seamen's Union 
of America (three to be elected), John Car- 
ney. C. J. Harrington, John T. Clark, Ber- 
nard McDonough. Thomas Reynolds, James 
Reimers and Peter Williamson. 



MODERN FISHING CRAFT. 



A contemporary calls attention to the fact 
that in British Columbia licenses to cut tim- 
ber on Government land are issued by a pub- 
lic official and bear this condition : 

This license is issued and accepted on the 
understanding that no Chinese or Japanese shall 
be employed in connection herewith. 

This surely is discrimination with a ven- 
geance against the cocky Japs and is said to 
be nothing unusual in the province. It seems 
ratlier strange that we have not heard a roar 
from the Mikado against this "outrageous" 
treatment of his subjects by an ally. If the 
allies of Japan are permitted to thus offi- 
cially discriminate and effectively boycott the 
little brown men, it might become advisable 
for Uncle Sam to follow Great Britain's 
example and become another ally of Japan. 
Any practical method which will quietly but 
effectively keep the Jap at home, or prevent 
him from acquiring a greater foothold on 
the Pacific Slope, should be welcomed. 



The strikes of cloakmakers, printing press- 
men and press assistants at San Franci-sco are 
deserving of every support. In both instances 
the strikes were originated in order to se- 
cure a very moderate increase for the low- 
est paid workers. The highest paid me- 
chanics who quit their jobs to help the lowest 
paid had nothing to gain personally and they 
displayed a commendable spirit of fraternity 
and courage in staying by the less fortunate 
toilers in their trade. Both strikes are pro- 
gressing favorably with every prospect for 
complete victory. The organized workers of 
San Francisco and California have seldom 
had the opportunity to support a more worthy 
cause than the strikes referred to. Here's 
best wishes for their success. 



In a state of universal organization 
among the workers one meal would be 
worth all the money in the world. In 
that event the advantage would lie with 
the stomach most inured to abstention. 
In other words, hunger would be the ally, 
not the enemy, of the workers. 



The most powerful labor organization 
is that which in addition to the ability to 
"put up a fight" has the brains to put up 
a good argument in justification or pre- 
vention of the last resort. 



That the spice of modernity has pervaded 
every nook and cranny of the social system 
and that under its inexorable decree even 
the byways of the sea have been made to 
give up many of their most cherished fan- 
cies, is evidenced by the present-day fishing 
craft. One of the last things to be affected 
by the times was the professional fishing 
boat, but so complete has finally become 
the change in her that her old friends would 
not now recognize her. There is an old 
saying in the navy, that "in the old days 
they had wooden ships and iron men ; now 
they have iron ships." And it is hard to 
conceive the degree of scorn an old salt can 
put into those words. Nevertheless the 
demand of the times is setting aside all 
other considerations, and commercial cus- 
toms and necessities have influenced the 
fisherman along with the banker. The fish- 
erman no longer goes to the Grand Banks 
or to Newfoundland in his smack, nor after 
putting in a cargo of fish waits for the 
wind to blow him. back. He now returns 
under the power from the auxiliary engine 
or "kicker" that most of the fishermen 
carry. 

The cry of the tar "now they have iron 
ships," applies literally to the fishing trade 
also, and at any large fishing port are to 
be found steel-hulled schooners, with two 
or three masts, taking the place of the old 
wooden sloops in which those redoubtable 
fishermen and whalers went up to and 
inside the Arctic circle and back on dead 
reckoning. 

The days of the bark, the brig and the 
full-rigged ship are gone, never to return, 
and all modern craft which are not steam 
throughout are schooners or sloops with 
auxiliary steam power. But the inference 
to be drawn from the expression, "in the 
old days they had wooden ships and iron 
men ; now they have iron ships," that the 
superiority of the present day vessel has 
produced a corresponding decadence or in- 
feriority of the man does not follow at all. 
On the contrary, the seafaring man of to- 
day is more thrifty, more dependable, bet- 
ter educated and better equipped in every 
way than ever before. He is just as good 
a sailor and a better business man. He 
knows just as much about how to keep his 
boat out of trouble as he ever did and he 
knows vastly more about how to supply 
humanity with what it requires. 

In perusing the fascinating tales of Ste- 
venson, and some of the lesser lights that 
have followed him, one has the conscious- 
ness of a sentimental regret at the passing 
of the old barks, to make room for those 
more in keeping with the times. But our 
soberer senses and knowledge tell us that 
the human race is better off for a change 
that has spelled such great improvement in 
so considerable a class of men as those who 
follow the sea.^ — Christian Science Monitor. 



A certain philosopher has said that "in- 
stinct guided by reason is never wrong." 
This observation explains much of the 
success of trade unionism, which is pri- 
marily an expression of the instinct of self- 
preservation. 



The trade union is a standing challenge 
to that miserable old cynicism, "Every 
man for himself, and the devil take the 
hindmost." 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 6, 191,3. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., R. Tunnell presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping slack with lots of men around. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

84 Embarcadero. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B, C, Sept. 29, 1913. 
No meeting. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 29, 1913. 
Shipping quiet; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
N. E. corner of Hastings and Main streets. 
P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 29, 1913. 
Shipping (lull, with few men around. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle .Agency, Sept, 29, 1913. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 29, 1913. 

Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept, 29, 1913. 
Shipping slack. 

G, A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave, Tel, East 
4912, 



Eureka .Agency, Sept. 29, 1913. 
No meeting; shipping slack. 

JOHN ANDERSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64- Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 29, 1913. 
Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128!/^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 22, 1913. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314 Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 2, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slow. Nomination of officers 
for the ensuing term was proceeded with. 
Nomination of delegates to the International 
Seamen's Union Convention will take place at 
next regular meeting at headquarters and the 
branches, October 9th. The Secretary's (luar- 
terly financial report was read and adopted. 
EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 25, 1913. 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203-205. Phone 
Main 2233. P. O. Box 214 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 25, 1913. 
Xo meeting. Shipping dull. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54 



Portland .Agency, Sept. 25, 1913. 
No meeting. Few men ashore; prospects im- 
proving. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
New Grand Central Hotel, Room 108, Third 
and P'landers Sts. 



DIED. 

Victor Matson, No. 109, a native of Sweden, 
age 38. died at San Francisco, Oct. 3, 1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



NORWEGIAN LABOR CONGRESS. 



The Congress of the Norwegian trade- 
unions took place in Christiania, June 22-29. 
Twelve hundred delegates representing ap- 
proximately 63,000 members were present. 

The trade-unions of Denmark, Sweden 
and Germany were represented. 

According to the business report of the 
secretary, the membership rose from 45,940 
to 63,000 during the three years covered by 
the report. The number of affiliated or- 
ganizations increased by seven. During 
this period 753 wages movements involving 
92,365 workers had been entered upon. 

The number of stoppages of work was 
no less than 162, in which 57,711 workers 
were involved. One million seven hundred 
and three thousand, six hundred and seven- 
ty-one kronen (one krone equals 27 cents) 
were expended in strike pay. 

The attempts at organization among the 
seamen and the agriculture and forest 
workers were successful, their unions hav- 
ing been formed during the period under 
review. The trade-union report was almost 
unanimously adopted after a lively dis- 
cussion. 

The most important matter for discussion 
was that concerning system of organization, 
and the tactics of the trade-unions. At 
this point the syndicalist element which 
has been noticeable in the Norwegian 
trade-union for the last few years was 
discussed. 

The syndicalist section had introduced 
propositions which had not the effect of 
weakening the national centralization, but 
which recognized in federations the admin- 
istrative organs of the National Center 
only. Local trade councils should be 
formed which should formulate the local 
principles of the national centralization. 
The discarding of tariff agreements and 
trade-union benefit institutions was de- 
manded. 

The tariff agreements to be replaced by 
"recognized working conditions," the char- 
acter of which the speaker himself could 
give no information. 

The congress rejected the syndicalist pro- 
posals, only twenty or twenty-one votes 
being in favor of them. In respect to the 
supplementing of the strike funds and in- 
struments by means of sabotage and other 
syndicalist methods, the congress decided 
by an overwhelming majority to leave 
such tactics severely alone. A resolution 
leaving the form of organization the same 
as before was adopted. 

It was decided almost unanimously to es- 
tablish local trade-union councils, the du- 
ties of which should be the furthering of 
the propaganda work, provision of meet- 
ing rooms, local organization, public meet- 
ings of the trade-unions, etc. It was de- 
cided during the discussion over the regu- 
lations to raise the minimum subscription 
which an affiliated organization might con- 
tribute to its strike funds from $1.75 to 
$2.50. Eleven organizations with 7300 
members were affected by this decision. 
The Congress therefore rejected the mo- 
tion for the reduction of the compulsory 
strike benefit of the national center. 

The congress protested as one man 
against the attempt on the part of the Lib- 
eral government to introduce compulsory 
courts of arbitration in the case of labor 
disputes. As soon as the e.xpected bill is 
submitted to the Parliament the central 
organization will call an extraordinary 



trade-union congress for the purpose of 
deciding the steps to be taken. 

In connection with the question of mu- 
tual strike benefit among the Scandinavian 
countries, the congress became a party to 
the decision of the Danish Trade-Union 
Congress. As the Swedish trade-unions 
have arrived at a different decision, the 
question has lieen postponed, and the 
voluntary system of financial assistance in 
great struggles remains. 

The co-operative provision stores move- 
ment is to be most zealously supported 
and joint action with its central to be 
brougfht about. 



UNEMPLOYMENT SUPPORT. 



In Denmark unemployment funds arc 
granted state and municipal support, ac- 
cording to the law of 1907. Accordingly 
the organized workers have now estab- 
lished unemployment funds for those call- 
ings for which none had previously existed. 
As regards membership and administration, 
the unemployment funds and trade-union 
organizations are identical. The only dif- 
ference is that unemployment funds are 
conducted separately and are under state 
control. These funds have received 6,400,- 
000 kronen (one krone equals 27 cents) 
from public moneys since 1907, while the 
income derived from members' contribu- 
tions amounted to 9,000,000 kronen. Eight 
million kronen was paid in benefit. 

All these unemployment funds are con- 
nected with a labor bureau which is man- 
aged entirely by the workers. The em- 
ployers have absolutely no control over 
same. 

For some time a brisk agitation has been 
carried on for the introduction of municipal 
labor exchanges throughout the whole 
land. The government quickly took up 
the matter, circularizing all interested 
bodies ; same has now submitted a bill to 
this effect to the Parliament. The govern- 
ment has been given to understand by. the 
National Center that the universal intro- 
duction of municipal employment bureaus 
would be welcomed as a means of fighting 
the exploiting tactics of the private em- 
ployment offices. The municipal employ- 
ment bureaus to cease supplying labor to 
any factories affected by a strike. 

The law mentioned was passed during 
the last parliamentary session and came 
into force July 1 last. Generally speaking, 
the organized labor is satisfied with this 
law, and is convinced that under the law 
it will be able to make its influence felt 
and further expand its already powerful 
organization. The following are the chief 
points of this law: 

The Ministry of the Interior is entitled 
to regard such employinent bureaus as are 
established by town or district councils as 
public institutions. The labor bureaus, 
with the exception of the one in Copen- 
hagen, are under the management of a body 
chosen by the district council. If it is so 
desired by even one of the councilors, then 
the vote must be taken on the representa- 
tion basis. The management consists of 
three workers, three employers and the 
chairman who may be neither employer 
nor employe. The members of this body 
receive no salary, but sufficient may be 
granted to cover losses through attending 
meetings. 

The bureau in Copenhagen is the cen- 
tral office for the whole country. It is to 



be managed by a salaried official specially 
appointed by the king or government. This 
official is at the same time chairman of a 
management board of at least ten mem- 
bers consisting of workers and employers 
in equal number. Two members of the 
board are to be appointed by the Minister 
of the Interior upon the proposition of the 
workers and a similar number on the prop- 
osition of the employers. The remaining 
members to be chosen at the meeting of 
the town council and if desired on the rep- 
resentation system. 

The services of the bureau are rendered 
free of charge to the workers of all grades. 
These bureaus do not cease operations 
during strikes, but all those seeking work 
are informed, if any trade-union organiza- 
tion has given notice of a strike. Notices, 
etc., to this effect may be posted up in 
the offices. 

-Ml official publications, etc., must be 
first approved by the ministry. In case 
the employment bureau sends a worker 
away from his place of residence, the lat- 
ter may be entitled to half his fare. The 
various labor bureaus are pledged, under 
a ministerial regulation, to co-operative ac- 
tion among themselves and with the central 
office, as well as to the compilation of un- 
employment statistics. 

Those unemployment benefit funds and 
branch offices recognized by the state have 
to submit to the bureaus a weekly list of 
all those members (names and addreses) 
drawing unemployment pay, as well as a 
list of those unemployed receiving no ben- 
efit — as far as this is possible. Members 
of approved unemployment funds are given 
preference by the bureaus. 

All the business and documents of these 
funds are confidential and no unauthorized 
person has access to same. Each local la- 
bor bureau has to submit a statement of 
accounts every year to the Minister of 
the Interior, certified by the district ad- 
ministration. The cost of these employ- 
ment bureaus is to be defrayed out of the 
district funds, but a state grant may be 
provided in the budget and distributed 
among the different bureaus by the Min- 
ister of the Interior. The additional grant 
may not exceed one-third of the total an- 
nual expenditure of the bureaus. The Min- 
ister of the Interior was authorized to es- 
tablish employment bureaus in those dis- 
tricts, where none exist on July 1, 1915. 



REDUCING CORPULENCE. 



The JoL'RN.\L does not vouch for the ac- 
curacy of the following story which ap- 
peared in the recent issue of the Nautical 
Gazette: 

"^lany of the greatest inventions have 
been the result of discoveries made by ac- 
cident. Here is the great hint for the re- 
duction of human corpulence, discovered 
on a recent trip of a transatlantic liner. 
A fat man had gone aboard thinking to 
stow away in a boat, but concluded it 
would be easier to get inside the mouth of 
a big ventilator. He had with him a loaf 
of bread and a bottle of water. The ven- 
tilator got narrower toward the bottom, 
which was in the engine room, and the 
man stuck, but after three days, what with 
the hot air and starvation, he became thin 
enough to slip through." 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



THE "TITANIC" MYSTERY. 



Much of the mystery that surrounds the 
sinking of the White Star liner "Titanic," 
with 1,600 of her passengers, on April 15, 
1912, may be dispelled by the discovery 
of a wreck, believed to be part of the hulk 
of the ill-starred vessel, standing on end in 
the Atlantic Ocean ofif the Grand Banks 
of Newfoundland, practically in the spot 
where the disaster occurred. Captain Rem- 
nant of the British steamship "Luciline," 
which recently arrived at Philadelphia from 
Bordeaux, reported sighting the derelict 
and the United States hydrographic office 
has begun an investigation to learn more 
about the wreck. 

Should the vessel sighted by the "Lu- 
ciline" prove to be the remains of the 
"Titanic," the story of the memorable 
wreck would be rewritten. The fact that, 
after more than a year, the hulk stands 
vertically in the waves, protruding eight 
feet or more above the surface, would 
indicate that a submerged ledge of rock 
had prevented the wreck from going to the 
bottom of the sea. If such a ledge exists — 
and evidences of one were reported as long 
ago as 1723 — then it is probable that the 
foundering of the "Titanic" was caused by 
the hidden obstruction ripping open her 
hull, as much as by her collision with the 
iceberg. It may be that the frozen moun- 
tain was anchored in the path of the big 
steamer by grounding on the sunken rocks. 
Should these theories prove to be facts, 
Captain Smith, who was in command of 
the "Titanic" and perished when his ves- 
sel went down, would be absolved of the 
charge of lack of vigilance. Damage suits 
against the International Mercantile Ma- 
rine, based on the disaster, would fall, 
leading admiralty lawyers say, for the 
same reason. 

Captain Remnant of the "Luciline," is 
inclined to believe that what he saw was 
the skeleton of the "Titanic," or a part of 
it. He reported that on July 5, in latitude 
39.40, longitude 48.19, he sighted a com- 
paratively old wreck, standing vertically 
in the water, with about eight feet of its 
length extending above the waves. The 
"Titanic" went down in latitude 41.40, 
longitude 50.14. The wreck was covered 
with a marine growth of camparatively re- 
cent formation, tending to show that it 
had been in the water a little more than a 
year. 

The derelict had the appearance. Cap- 
tain Remnant said, of being held down 
by anchors in shoal water, and of being 
buoyed up by water-tight compartments. 
He is of the opinion that it is the forward 
part of the "Titanic," which, it was said, 
split in two just before it sank. 

Mariners say there is every reason to 
credit the existence of a submerged ledge 
of rock at or near the spot where the 
"Titanic" was destroyed. On various oc- 
casions three different obstructions of such 
a character have been reported. The posi- 
tion occupied by the wreck reported by the 
master of the "Luciline" is remarkably 
close to the point where breakers were 
seen by liervagault in 1723, in latitude 
41.02, longitude 49.23. Breakers were again 
reported in the same spot in 1827 and in 
1855 an obstruction, consisting of three 
sunken rocks, with a long ledge, was re- 
ported in latitude 40.27, longitude 49.06. 
The calculation of the position of the grave 



of the "Titanic," latitude 41.40, longitude 
50.14, as well as those of the sunken rocks, 
are all approximate, and probably are the 
same spot. 

Lieutenant Commander Landenberger, 
United States hydrographer, said the mat- 
ter is one of the utmost importance. He 
asserted that the Government should dis- 
patch a surveying vessel to the scene of 
the disaster to establish or disprove at 
once the existence of the sunken ledge. 
The fact that an old wreck was seen there, 
he said, is an evidence that some such 
menace to navigation exists in that part of 
the ocean. 

It is thought that the sunken rocks may 
be the pinnacles of mountains whose base 
is the bed of the ocean. Geographers as- 
sert that such peaks exist in both the 
Atlantic and Pacific oceans. Many of the 
Soutliern Pacific Islands, it is said, were 
formed by coral insects and in other ways, 
with the summit of a submarine mountain 
as the nucleus. 



RUSTING OF SHIP'S PLATES. 



Experiments have recently been carried 
out by the German naval authorities with 
a view of discovering some means of pre- 
venting the rusting of ship's plates. The 
results are said to have been interesting 
and surprising. It was shown that in some 
cases the color which was intended as a 
protection was actually an inducing cause 
of rust. Polished steel plates were painted 
with stripes, and in order to distinguish 
them the stripes were numbered, the fig- 
ures being painted over tlie strij^es in oil 
colors. It was then discovered that rust 
had started immediately beneath the fig- 
ures — tiiat is to say, precisely under the 
spot where it might have been thought 
that the protection was strongest. Similar 
observations were made in connection with 
iron objects other tlian plates. A further 
series of experiments was then begun with 
different kinds of paint. Highly polished 
steel plates were painted with one, two, 
three and four coats of different descrip- 
tions of paint. Each coat was allowed to 
dry thoroughly, and then steam of no par- 
ticular pressure was passed over the plates. 
.After some time the i)aint was removed, 
and it was found that the plate with only 
one coat of paint was not rusted at all, the 
plate witli two coats was slightly rusted, 
that with three coats was worse, and that 
with four coats was rusted worst of all. 
The explanation appears to 1)c that the sec- 
ond coat tends to dissolve the first and 
make it porous, this condition being in- 
creased with each additional coat. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



The total lumber cut of Grays Harbor 
for 1912 was 923,000,000 feet. Of this Ab- 
erdeen cut 375,000,000; Hoquiam, 294,000,- 
000; Cosmopolis and Montesano, 54,000,000 
feet. The shingle cut amounted to 517,- 
000,000 feet. Chehalis County has within 
its borders approximately thirty-five billion 
feet of standing timber. Other timber trib- 
utary to Grays Harbor amounts to about 
sixty-five billion, making a total amount 
of standing timber tributary to Grays Har- 
bor about one hundred billion feet. In 
these mills and logging camps there is an 
annual payroll of something in excess of 
five million dollars. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. T 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 162 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAT CITT, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG. N. T 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, O '. 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenu* 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave, East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. T 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITT, MICH 108 Fifth Avenu* 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

BUFFALO, N. T., 66 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2296 

BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 64 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG. N. T 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAT CITT. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH PT^ICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND. O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. T. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. T. 
Oswego, N. T. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault St. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



RUSSIAN WORKERS' CONDITION. 



The starvation wages paid to the Russian 
workers are proved by the following fig- 
ures, in the International News Letter: 

The metal workers in St. Petersburg 
come first with 473 to 523 rubles (a ruble 
equals 50 cents) per annum. 

In the other industrial districts the metal 
workers received an average wage of 373 
rubles in 1911; all other workers an aver- 
age of 25 L 

The workers in the mining industry re- 
ceive an average wage of 250 rubles. The 
average wage of the metal workers was 33 
rubles per month in the year 1912. 

The average yearly wage of the metal 
workers in the various provinces is as fol- 
lows: Livland 431 rubles, Archangelsk 423 
rubles, Kurland 69 rubles, Estland 353 ru- 
bles, Perma 270 rubles, Pskov 234 rubles, 
Novogorod 215 rubles, Witebsk 169 rubles 
annually. The wages in the other indus- 
tries are still lower. In the leather manu- 
factories the workers received 14 rubles 
per month, sugar factories 9 rubles and in 
the cotton mills 18 rubles. Seven rubles to 
30 rubles are paid in the textile industry. 

In consequence of these hunger wages the 
conditions of life are really pitiful, and 
under-feeding is not to be avoided. 

The Russian factory worker in country 
districts subsists solely upon bread, kvass, 
onions, thick gruel and fat. Only Sundays 
and holidays is any meat eaten. 

The town worker must satisfy himself 
with bread, sausage, cheese, herrings and 
cucumbers. 

A correspondent, writing from among the 
St. Petersburg metal workers states that 
the strike among the employes of the firm 
of G. A. Lessner, machinery manufacturers, 
has already lasted three months. This 
strike was brought by the refusal of the 
employers to dismiss Foreman Lauel. Lauel 
had without any grounds denounced a 
youth, Strongin, as a thief, with the result 
that the latter committed suicide. 

The firm is supported by the Employers' 
Federation. 

The workers in the other factories are 
with the strikers. We now learn that the 
firm is seeking to obtain strikebreakers 
from abroad, and request the organizations 
to make a note of this. 

Two labor dailies, the Prawada and the 
Lutsch, have been published in St. Peters- 
burg since 1912. 

The former represented the left wing 
of the Russian Social Democrats, - while 
the latter represented the reformist party. 

On July 5 of the present year, the St. 
Petersburg courts of justice prohibited 
both papers, alleging that they "system- 
atically overstepped the legally appointed 
boundaries and were of a sharply defined 
party character," calculated to have a de- 
moralizing influence upon the populace. 

The following figures will give an idea 
of the hardships with which these papers 
had to cope during their existence. The 
Prawada was first published on April 22, 
1912. On the occasion of the first anni- 
versary of these papers the readers were in- 
formed that they had been confiscated 41 
times, and the editors fined altogether 7,000 
rubles, or 47 months' imprisonment. Be- 
sides this, the editors were each sentenced 
to three months' imprisonment. The con- 
fiscations of the last few months, which 
have happened in the case of almost every 



number, are not included in the figures 
given. 

The fact that the courts of justice have 
lifted the censor from sixteen confiscated 
numbers, will suffice to show with what 
zeal the work of confiscation is being 
executed. 

Indignation has, as a matter of fact, been 
expressed. The anti-labor press asserted, 
and quite rightly, too, that it was useless 
to suppress the legal labor press, as, if 
the legal right were withheld then the 
workers would conduct their political ef- 
forts and demands, through illegal chan- 
nels. The labor press is not to be wiped 
out any more than the labor class itself. 

The prohibition of the two papers struck 
one as being all the more drastic as the 
Senate had not previously forbidden the 
publication of Social Democratic journals. 
The excuse that the papers had assumed 
a "sharply defined party character" was ab- 
solutely absurd. And as regards the "de- 
moralizing influence on the populace," the 
Pogram papers of the "black hundred" with 
their incitement of national hate are the 
greatest offenders in this direction. 

That the ruthlessness of the Government 
cannot quash the labor movement, nor pre- 
vent it from publishing its journals is 
proved by the fact that in the place of the 
suppressed papers two new labor dailies 
have come into existence. They are called 
the .Schivaja Schisny and Rabotschaja Pra- 
wada. Xos. 2 and 3 of the Rabotschaja 
Prawada and No. 5 of the Schivaja Schisny 
have already been confiscated. 

The Minister of Commerce has recently 
published a statement under the heading, 
"The protection of health and life of the 
Industrial Workers," giving data concern- 
ing accidents. 

Seventy-seven thousand, six hundred and 
eight accidents, 458 resulting in fatalities, 
were recorded in the year 1910, in the 
works coming under factory inspection. 
In the same year 84,882 accidents, result- 
ing in sixty-one deaths, happened in the 
mining industry. 

Altogether 290,578 accidents, 4,562 of 
which ended fatally, were officially recorded 
in Russia in the year 1910. 

The official figures include by no means 
all the accidents to workers engaged in in- 
dustry. According to Bikow, no fewer 
than 325,000 accidents happen in the Rus- 
sian industries every year, of which number 
there are 40,000 cases of serious injury, 
and 6,000 of death. Capitalism is already 
making frightful demands upon the Russian 
workers. 



A recent statement to the effect that 
English may within a few years become 
tiic language of Japan makes interesting 
some late statistics with regard to the use 
of the leading languages of the world. 
From these it would appear that English 
is spoken by 130,000,000 persons, German 
by 100,000,000, Russian by 70,000.000, 
French by 45,000,000, Spanish by 40,000,000 
and Italian by 30,000,000. For obvious 
reasons, the use of the Spanish language 
is growing very rapidly among people of 
commercial countries, especially those of 
Germany, England and the United States. 
— Christian Science Monitor. 



The union label is the best guarantee of 
a decent minimum wage. Demand it on 
all products ! 



MILL OFFICERS ARRESTED. 



Six men were shot and two probably 
fatally wounded in a riot at the Pope tin 
mill at Steubenville, Ohio, when the guards 
fired into 2,000 strikers. The most seri- 
ously hurt were P. H. Miller and John 
Doran, strikers. Chief of Police Frank- 
hauser was hit in the head with buckshot. 
Twenty strike-breakers left the public 
square in this city for the mill. They were 
accompanied by mill guards in an automo- 
bile. Near the mill entrance threats were 
made by persons in the crowd to attack 
the plant. This was followed by a volley 
from the automobile. Shotguns and revol- 
vers were used. Chief of Police Frank- 
hauser, who was in the crowd trying to re- 
store order, was one of the first men hit. 
He was not seriously wounded. As a re- 
sult of the rioting at the Pope tin plate 
mill warrants were issued for the arrest of 
John F. Lloyd, assistant superintendent of 
the mill; E. ^I. Menser, manager; John 
Bradley, captain of the mill guards, and 
John Reices, a chauffeur. These were later 
arrested and held on a charge of first de- 
gree murder. The authorities declare 
Reices fired the shot which killed Molar. 
He was in an automobile with the others 
arrested, escorting strike-breakers to the 
mill. The strikers were fired upon and 
eleven were wounded. Molar later died. 
Four mill guards are also held in connec- 
tion with the shooting. Molar was watch- 
ing the crowd about the mill from the 
porch of his home when he was shot. 
Frank Folaj', another bystander, shot in the 
eye, may die also. Others may be ar- 
rested also in the attempt to fasten the 
responsibility for the shooting by the mill 
guards of a number of strikers, two of 
whom are expected to die. One, Joseph 
Miller, is not expected to live. Four guards 
were arrested in a clash with police and are 
being held without bond. They were found 
along the river bank, armed with revolvers 
and rifles. A United States deputy mar- 
shal, of Columbus, served writs of citation 
on ten strikers from the plant of the Phil- 
lips Sheet and Tin Plate Company, who 
are alleged to have violated the order of 
injunction granted two weeks ago by 
United States Judge Slater. A hearing on 
the contempt charges is fixed for Thurs- 
da}' next at Columbus. At a hearing be- 
fore a judge the arrested officials, charged 
with murder in the first degree, were ad- 
mitted to bail in the sum of $5,000 each. 



Under new arrangements between the 
Xavy and .Agricultural departments at 
Washington, the meteorological charts of 
the oceans and of the Great Lakes pub- 
lished by the Weather Bureau have been 
discontinued. The August chart of the 
oceans was the last of the series issued 
from the Weather Bureau, and the Sep- 
tember charts are the last for the Lakes. 
The special meteorological data, however, 
will be published on the pilot charts of 
the oceans, prepared and issued by the 
Hydrographic Office. The Weather Bu- 
reau will continue to collect meterological 
reports, but the results will henceforth be 
published by the Hydrographic Office in 
addition to the other matter published on 
its charts. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



indicate that the strike will be continued 
indefinitely. One incident which occurred 
during the week has aroused the sympathy 
of the people in favor of the strikers. 

During a parade an American flag was 
being carried by one of the paraders when 
the State cavalry dashed into the ranks 
of the marchers and the flag was torn from 
the carrier and trampled under the feet of 
the horses. This action caused such vigor- 
ous protest that a story was given out that 
the horses became unmanageable. Realiz- 
ing the serious ofifense they had committed, 
the soldiers then gathered up the flag and 
returned it to its owner. When this in- 
cident was called to the attention of Presi- 
dent Gompers, he said, "The mine owners 
have the government agencies at their dis- 
posal. They stop at nothing, not even to 
trampling down the nation's flag." He de- 
clared that the militia was at the command 
of the capitalists and that it was being 
used in Calumet to defeat the strike in 
which laborers were seeking to improve 
their conditions. The Calumet-Hecla Com- 
pany was organized in 1871, with a capital 
stock of $2,500,000, of which only $1,200,000 
was paid in. It has paid $121,000,000 in 
dividends during the last forty years, an 
average of $3,000,000 a year, besides paying 
over $40,000,000 for eciuipment, including 
railway and transportation stock, and also 
investing about $25,000,000 in other mines. 
Ouincy Adam Shaw, president of the com- 
pany, draws a salary of $100,000 a year 
as president and $20,000 a year as di- 
rector. First Vice-President E. L. Agassiz 
draws $50,000 a year as vice-president, and 
$20,000 as a director. James McNaughton, 
the "big boss" and king of the copper 
company, draws $25,000 a year as second 
vice-president, $20,000 as director, and $40,- 
000 as general manager. Several other 
officers also draw princely salaries. These 
facts are given to prove that the company 
is able to meet the demands of the men 
and still make 300 per cent, dividends for 
the stockholders. 



Favor Municipal Car Line. 

San Francisco's recent 3 to 1 vote in 
favor of municipal railway bonds seems to 
have started a wave of city ownership senti- 
ment. The transbay cities have decided 
that they would like to follow suit. To 
that end a conference of the Mayors of 
Berkeley, Oakland and Alameda has been 
called to devise means of taking over the 
traction lines in those communities, which 
now are owned by F. M. Smith, the "borax 
king." Such a move toward municipal 
ownership may be made under a law that 
passed the last Legislature. This new 
statute provides that cities or towns in 
one or more counties may combine them- 
selves into a "public utility" district to con- 
struct or acquire public works to meet the 
people's needs. The bill became operative 
on August 11. It is fashioned after a 
similar law which permits the consolidation 
of communities to create a water district 
for the municipal ownership of waterworks. 



Breaking Power of the Trust. 

An English builder was awarded the 
contract for the turbine drums for the 
newest American battleship No. 39 at a 
little more than one-third the price oiifered 
by the lowest American bidder. The ac- 



cepted bid, $57,436, was submitted by New 
York agents of the Cyclops Steel and Iron 
Works, Sheffield, England. It is excep- 
tional for the Navy Department to send a 
contract abroad, but Acting Secretary 
Roosevelt held that the action to-day was 
justified by the tremendous difference be- 
tween the English and American prices. 
The Sheffield bid includes the payment of 
duty, and by giving the work to the foreign 
builder the United States saves more than 
$100,000. There were two American bidders, 
the Bethlehem Steel Company, $169,568, 
and the Midvale Steel Company, $160,272. 



A "Prosperous" Year. 

The Bureau of Railway Economics, in a 
recent statement relative to the earnings of 
railroads, shows a striking situation. On 
the basis per mile of railroad the operating 
revenues increased 8.3 per cent., while the 
operating expenses increased 8.5 per cent.; 
operating income, after payment of taxes 
(that which remains for the bond and 
shareholders), increased 8.3 per cent. The 
New York Annalist, in commenting on the 
situation, says: "It is the best showing 
the railroads have ever made as to both 
gross revenues and net income in the ag- 
gregate or per mile. These results are 
owing partly to the natural increase of 
business and partly to the increase of in- 
vestment in facilities. The amount of new 
capital invested during the year, or the 
amount previously invested, that became 
productive in these twelve months is not 
yet susceptible of statistical treatment. 
However, the increase of more than $62,- 
557,000 (8.3 per cent.) in net income would 
be 5 per cent, on $1,250,000,000, and it is 
improbable that the additional capital in- 
vestments reflected in these earnings were 
as great as that. The cost of conducting 
transportation, shown as traffic and trans- 
portation expenses, increased relatively 
much less." 



Children's Bureau. 

The Children's Bureau, under the United 
States Department of Labor, has just issued 
the first part of a handbook- of Federal sta- 
tistics of children. The matter has been 
compiled from the reports of the 1910 
census, and this compilation was under- 
taken for the purpose of aflfording a basis 
upon which to extend the future work of 
the bureau. One of the conclusions is to 
the efifect that it is important that the wel- 
fare of children in the smaller cities and 
in rural communities be looked after. The 
figures show that less than one child in five 
is living in a city of 100,000 inhabitants 
or over, and that three in five are living in 
villages of less than 2,500 inhabitants or in 
distinctly rural communities. In New Eng- 
land and in the Middle Atlantic, North 
Central, and the Pacific States the per- 
centage of children living in cities of 100,- 
000 inhabitants or over is far greater, reach- 
ing as high at 43.4 per cent, in the Middle 
Atlantic group. In the South Atlantic and 
South Central States, on the other hand, 
the percentage living in cities of 100,000 or 
more is small, the highest being 6.6 in the 
South Atlantic States, but the percentage 
in rural districts is high, being above 80 in 
all Southern divisions. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATPORIi. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release frorri employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and 
Imperative Xlandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEN'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 



for 
the 



(Continued from Page 5. J 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock. P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER. Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash,. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN. Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



When a man tires At the "slow prog- 
ress" of the labor movement a good recipe 
is to stand ofif a bit and survey the work 
actually accomplished. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

» ERSKINe STREET, 8YDNCY, N. •. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



^MMWMM^^NA^MN^^^NMMA^M^ 



Residence Phone Ballard 1639 



In order to maintain improved 
communications between Prince Ed- 
ward Island and the mainland in 
New Brunswick during winter 
months, the Canadian Government 
has decided upon a carferry service 
to be maintained between Cape Tor- 
mentine and Carleton Point. 

The first large vessel to navigate 
the Gatun lake section of the Pana- 
ma Canal, twenty-four miles in 
length, a suction dredge, known as 
No. 82, left its moorings near the 
Gatun locks recently and steamed to 
a point north of Gamboa dike. The 
dredge will begin the removal of 
150,000 cubic yards of silt deposited 
by the currents of the Chagres 
River. 

All the wireless telegraph stations 
under the control of the Department 
of the Naval Service of Canada, from 
the head of the Great Lakes east- 
ward, throughout Canada and New- 
foundland, are now provided with 
the weather forecasts issued daily 
by the Meteorological Service of 
Canada, and the same will be trans- 
mitted to any ship asking for them, 
free of "coast station" charges. 

A bill dealing with the French 
Navy is in preparation. Under its 
provisions recruits who have the 
merchant marine certificate will be 
specially trained during the first year, 
and in the second will become offi- 
cers of the reserve of the second 
grade. Those who show the great- 
est proficiency will have the chance 
of being promoted in the third year 
to the rank of sub-lieutenant of the 
reserve. 

The 9,000.000 appropriated by the 
State of Massachusetts for improve- 
ments at Boston has been allotted by 
the Port Directors as follows: $3,- 
000,000 for a new dry dock; $3,000,- 
000 for the Eastern Railroad pier, and 
the filling of 170 acres of flats in 
East Boston; and $3,000,000 for de- 
velopment at South Boston, includ- 
ing the reconstruction of Common- 
wealth Pier No. 5, now well ad- 
vanced. 

Captain E. H. Derrickson, of tlie 
barge Berkes, which was lost in a 
storm off the Virginia coast while 
bound for Philadelphia, was rescued 
after being in the water 28 hours 
and landed at Newbern, N. C. The 
Berkes was in tow of the tug Kirk- 
ston with two other barges when 
she was torn away. Captain Der- 
rickson and three men were aboard. 
With her cargo she was valued at 
$33,000. 

A total of 1,030,434 tons of coal 
were dumped over the Hampton 
Roads coal piers during the month of 
August just ended. The Norfolk and 
Western led, having dumped a total 
of 455,269 tons over the Lambert's 
Point piers, the Chesapeake and Ohio 
was second with a total dumping of 
291,780 tons over the Newport News 
piers, while the Virginian dumped 
283,385 tons over the Sewall's Point 
pier. 

A record number of tourists vis- 
ited the Panama Canal Zone in the 
first six months of the present year. 
From January until July, 18,972 vis- 
itors inspected the work, which is 
nearly as many as the entire number 
of sightseers viewing the canal in 
1912. In the past four years 68,024 
tourists have landed in Colon on the 
Atlantic side, while only a few hun- 
dred arrived in Panama at the Paci- 
fic entrance. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
202-4 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Vernon W. Buck Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & KNUTSON 
Lawyers and Praetors In Admiralty 
Free Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia Sts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



SMORB 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERIV1AIM8.SCHERIV1ER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE. WASH. 

Seattle Navigation School 

Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 
latest requlrwnents. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for Llcenae 
of any grade; Maater, 
4 '"^ Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 

Coast or Inland, 

By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean ■team and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDINQ 
911 Western Ave., SBATTL.H. Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Ann* 664 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY <L YOUNG 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsapartUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-119 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Herman Schulze 

-CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA. CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENQORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODQINQ 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF Coffee 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSBN, Prop. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Seattle, Wa»h., Letter LUt. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 
Abrahamsen, Jo- Johnson, A. 

hannes Jensen, ilans -21H 

Ander.son, H. Jensen, G. S. 

Andersen, A. -1352 Johanson, Kn\it 
Alonzo, J. Johannesen, Olaf 

Absalomsen, O. M. Johanson, K. J. 
Alexis, H. Johanson, Theodor 

Agerup. K. B. Johnson, G. 

Andersen, O. -1719 Johnson, Olaf 
Anderson, A. -1821 Kalnlng, J. 
Anderson, H. Torn! Krutz. Ivan 
Anderson, Ragnvald Klobnikoff, I. W. 
Anderson, David Korber, Th. 
Anderson, I. Kreuta, Karl 

Anderson. Hjalmar Karslma, N. 



Behr, Henry 
Burholtz, F. 
Borgen. K. S. 
Brox, H. 
Brower, G. 
Broberg, Chas. 
Buekow, C. W. 



Karrell, J. 
Kolberg, Joe 
Larsen. L. A. 
Larsen, Charles 
Little, Sid 
Ljunggren, Edmund 
Lof, Oscar 



Christensen, Anton Larson, Ingvald 



Crosley, J. 
Carlson, Thure 
Davidson, Jacob 
Davis. Joseph 
Dvlwik. E. 
Dall. Carl 
Ellinsen, H. O 
Enig, Herman 
Ehlert. August 
Edvardsen, Anton 
Ekwall, G. A. 
Ellison, Sam 
Eliason, C. 
Rrikson, Axel 
Eskilsen, Lars 
Evanger, Nils 
Ponslund. Victor 



Larsen, Axel -1746 
Larson, .John 
Lovera, P. 
Lackey, C. 
I..arsen, L. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, A. 
Larsen, Fred 
Lundgren. K. J. 
Marks, T. 
Martins, Paul 
McPherson, R. 
McCarthy, J. 
Mortensen, J. C. 
Murphy, D. 
Mynchmeyer, H. 
Maver, J. S. 



Fredriksen. Harold Macdonald, N. 



Fjellman, Geo. 
FreenLin, J. 
Franzell, A. 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Forsen, Alex 
Fortune. John 
Framness. Ivar 
Gaugserud, O. K. 
Gehler, F. 
Grant. J. J. 
Grantley. C. W. 
Gunderson, L. S. 
Hansen, A. M. 
Hansen, Hans 
Helpap, A. 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen. N. S. 
Hoglund, Ephralm 
Hoist. L. 
Hubner, Herman 
Jaeger, F. J. 
Jacobsen, Torglls 
Jacobsen. Johan 



M.irtinsen. Harold 
Makl. Ivar 
Mathisen, Nils 
McNeary, J. 
McDougall, J. 
Miller. J. C. 
Mikkelsen, K. -lf.20 
Moore, J. M. 
Muir, J. 
Munroe, W. 
Martinsen, Ragn- 
vald 
Newland E. 
Nielsen, F. M. 
Nilsen. T. H. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nelson, H. J. 
Nlcholsen. F. E. 
Nilson, Andrew 
Neilsen, Erlvard 
Nielsen, Alfons 
Nilsen. Albert 
Nylund, Arthur 



Abramis, George 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, Gust, 

-ISOS 
Anderson, Nils 
Anderson, Ole 
Andersen, Mike 
Anderson, Otto 
Anderson, Erik B. 
Allexander, John 
Albreclitsen, Page 
Androlio, A. 
Bergman, Karl W. 
Brodig, Wm. G. 
Bulls, Ernest 
Buckmer, W. 
Carlson, Charlie 
Chase, W. P. 



Larsen, Eng\'ald 
Larsen, Martin, 

-1710 
Larsen, Soren 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewik, Karl 
Lemarchand, Louis 
Lendeman, Ruhtii 
Lundsoor, Oskar 
Lundmark, Heege 
Lundquist, Ernest 
Macrae, Allexander 
Marchand, Louis 
Mattson, Maurits 
Miller, Chas. 
MfManus, John 
McMalion, Jack 
Meinke, Kudolt 



Christensen, Albert Meyer, W. 



Colman, E. 

Conway, M. E. 

Collins. Frank 

Cunnlcham, W. P 

Dahl, Henry 

Day, Aca 

Dennis, Charlie 

liorff, William 

Edstroni, John 

Ehenbaugh, " W. J. 

Ekham, Frans 

Fredriokson, H. G 

Gjortz, P. 

Gordia, Piet 

Gulliksen, Amandus Petersen, Aage 

Hall, G. A. Peterson, Hans 

Hansen, Bernard Peterson, Heinle 

llelin. Waldemar I'etterson, Einar 

llinrlks, Waldemar Pedersen, Peter 

Hciike, Ernest Pratt, M. L. 

Heilman, Albin Rantio, Jacob 

Helenius, Oskar Raetz. August 



Nelson, Anton 
Nelsen, C. J. 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Nielsen, Edward 
Nilsson, Osvold 
Narberg, John 
Narman, Ludwig 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Olsen, Severln 
Olsen, Ausgar 
O'Brien, Jack 
Person, Charles 
I'erouse, Andre 
Petrich, Theodore 



Hohm, E. 

Huntington, E. R. 

Hoch, Gore 

Hultman, A. 

Joliansen, Johan F. Simens, O. L. 

Johnsen, Chris Schulz, Robert 



Rasniussen, Thor 
Roed, Halfdan 
Sandstrom, Hugo 
Sanders, Chas. 



Jolinson, Axel 
.lohnson. Jack 
Johnson, Ole C. 
.Tohnson, W. 
Johnson, H. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Karlson, K. E. 
Kenny, James 
Kealy, James 
Kikur, Allesander 
Koop, Nick 
Kroiistrand, H. T. 
Kristensen, W. 
Koalvik. Oscar 
Laine, Frank 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, George 
Lurberg 



Saule, J. L. 
Swanson, John 
Swenson, Carl Oscar 
Saukha, August 
Swenson, John B. 
Thomas, A. 
Tamford, B. A. 
Trost, Peter 
Wall, W. H. 
Warren, Chas. B. 
Wadren, G. F. 
Westlund, Gust 
Wehi, J. 

Wiejurecht. Ernest 
Weshart, Jno. 
Welsen, J. 
Bunk, Bruno 



«>^^^>^>^^^A^^^^^A^^S^/N^/VN^WS^^.»/V^V%.V^.N^rf^» 



O'Brien. J. S. 
Olsen, C. 
Olsen, Trygve 
Olsson, Brov 
Olsen, O. -1062 
Olsen, Ed 
Olsen, C. E. 
Olsen, B. -597 
Omholt. T. 
Orell, A. 
Pedersen. O. A. 
Poppe, Geo. 
Petterson, Karl 
Pedersen, Hedley 
Pedersen, P. C. 
Pedersen, Peder 



Persson, Johan 
Petterson, Harry 
Petersen, V. -1447 
Petterson, Richard 
Petterson. S. 
Quigley. R. E. 
Rees. W. 

Skubber. H. (Reg- 
istered) 
Stahlbaum. E. 
Stone, C. L. 
Saiidbiirg, C. 
Schuldt. Theoder 
Seley. G. 
Sterr, W. T. 
Saar, J. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 449 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. 6t., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



HOTEL YOUNG 

European Plan 

313-315-317 SECOND ST., EUREKA 

Rooms, 25c per Night up 

Per Week, $1.50 up 

UNION LUNCH COUNTER 



^^^^^^^^^V^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^'^^'^'N^^^^^^rS^^^^ 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PALMER, Proprietor 

A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand— Sailors' Hail— 553-R 
EUREKA 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union made. 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 
Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

Eureka, Cal., Letter LUt. 



Ahlstrom, Harry 
Anderson, John 
Breien, Hans 
Claus€n, Fred 
Debus, Fred 
Ehlert, August 
Gudmundsen, 
mund 



Hansen. Harald 
Ismas, Richard 

Samuelson, H. 
SchuUz. P. (Regis- 
tered) 
Schultz. Axel 
Soott. Alfred 
Starness, C. O. 
Storek 

Stewart. J. G. 
Strauss. W. 
St. Johns. C. R. 
Siiarth, A. 
Steel, J. R. 
Sharness, C. O. 
Sperlan, B. 



Jacobsen. W. 
Jensen, George 
Nilson. Anton 
Miller. Fred 
Publicatus, August 
Plas, Henry 
Gud- Robertson, A. 

Svvertsen. Paul 



Thorsen, Fredrik 



Thomson, P. 
Tyghe, T. 
Tliienpoint. F. 
Thogren, David 
Thorsen, Tom 
J^easted, T. P. 
Van Loo, A. 
Verney, A. 
Waischwell, A. 
Warner, .Take 
Waters, T>. A. 
Wehde, F. 
Wessman. John 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



^^^^^^^i^^^^^V^^^V^*^^WVS^WN^^WNi'N/^'*>''VS*»«» 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
m« your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. . - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Berglind, Erik 
Conley, J. H. 
Dehler, Alfred 
Christensen, Albert 
Dehler, Alfred 
Ellison, Harry H. 
Eidsvcog, Petter 
Fors, Alfred 
Grovefi Albert 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hangen, Arthur 
Hetman, Walter 
Iversen, Ivar 



Jorgensen, Peter A. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Kesler, Karl 
Kathy, A. 
Melgail, M. 
Moreii, G. H. 
Nilsson, Edvin 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen. Martin E. 
Persson, John 
Plesner, Levi J. 
Person, Fritz 
Petterson, J. M. 
Simonsen, Sigvald 
Seblom. John 
Thorsen, Axel L. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deali exclusively In Uni»n-Mad© CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman t Kati, Just 
around th« corner from the UnUn Office. 



vWORKERS UNION> 



UNIOf^TAMP 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Headquarters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers In LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 
WholesaU and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 

311-13 Water St., Port Town»end, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 

Aberdeen, IViasA., Letter List. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Car«ful Servica 



Phone 691 



Stand: 
At Sallora' Union Office 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson, -1283 
Aalto, Waino 
Andersen, F. C. 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Arntzen, Werner 
Armstrong-, Harry 
Berger, C. 
Behn, Alfred 
Brown, C. 
Carlstrom, John 
Christensen, Albert 
Carson, Edward 
Duval, Bennet 
Edwardsen, Anton 
Finth, Richiird 
Flatten, James 
Granijei'K. Eric 
Graf, Otto 
Glase, Gustav 
Hohn, Artliur 
Herman, Axel 
Hansen, Ove 
Johansen, Harry 
Jensen, Harry 



Kaiser, Fred 
Kallio, Frans 
Loining, Hermand 
Ljungberg, Herman 
Lengtssen, Gottfried 
Laine, Herman 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Mertz, G. 
Mekerman, Ernest 
Nikolin, E. Miko 
Olsen, Nils 
Oksanen, Juko 
Peterson, Axel 
Petersen, Christian 
Rommel, Andrew 
Stangeland, Peter S. 
Schaclit, H. 
Tliorn, -70 
Wakler, Olsen N. 
Wind, Jacob, -1357 
Zoerb, Walter 
Pacl<ages. 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 

THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 
Seamen's JoumaL 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Axel Peterson, F. Lundberg, J. 
Gustafson, M. Garcia, crew of the 
steamer Riverside, at the time she 
towed in the Oceana Vance, kindly 
call at the office of the Charles Nel- 
son Co. for money due them. 

Victor N. Kvenen, a native of 
Belgium, age 32, last heard of in 
Ashtabula, Ohio, April, 1909, inquired 
for by his brother John Kvenen, 
Route 2, Raleigh, Tenn. 



When on Gray's Harbor Smoke 

Grandmont Cigars, lOc. 

Union Pilot, 5c. 

Best Union Made Cigars on 
the market. 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE IVIARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

4201/2 E- Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS 



LEADING JEWELERS AND 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 



Watch and Chronometer Repairing 

and Renting 

BURNETT BROS., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News and 
Drug Co. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

DRUGS, BOOKS, STATIONERY 

We Specialize on Medicine Ciiests 

Agt. S. F. Examiner, Clironicle & Call 



*WWW^'WWS/WWWWS/^•^^v^•^.•^'VN^^^»vws 



Phone 342 



Box 843 



When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 
Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St.. Aberdeen, Wa«h. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorperated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HEREON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

^^Z^wTIbXrki^^ 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 
All Union Made Goods 



203-5 G Street, 



Aberdeen 



Washington 



Bassett News Q Drug Co. 

Headquarters 
SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. URSHKAH ST.. ABERDEEN 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 

George Campbell is inquired for 
by his mother. He is supposed to 
sail out of San Francisco. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, 655 
31st Avenue, Vancouver, B. C. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen. 

John Rebbetad, who was in the 
steamer A. F. Lucas in November, 
1911, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem Ave., Roanoke, 
Va. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San Francisco, 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

Mrs. Alice Phillips wishes to hear 
from her husband, Tom Phillips. 
Write to 35 Sussex St., Sydney, N. 
S. W., Australia. 

Fritz Rohnstock, a firen»an on the 
Coast steamers, is inquired for by his 
relatives. 



Hereafter every single person in 
the United States (citizen or foreign 
resident) whose annual income ex- 
ceeds $3000, and every married per- 
son with an income above $4000, is 
expected to report his or her re- 
ceipts in detail to the Government 
agents March 1 of each year for the 
purpose of paying the income tax. 
The establishment of a laboratory 
for the study of criminal, pauper 
and defective classes, the work to 
include also the collection of so- 
ciological and pathological informa- 
tion, is called for in a bill intro- 
duced in the House by Representa- 
tive O'Leary of New York. The 
proposed institution will be located 
in the District of Columbia. 

William Jay Gaynor, ex-Supreme 
Acting Chief Justice Parker of the 
Washington State Supreme Court is- 
sued an alternative writ to prohibit 
Superior "Injunction" Judge John E. 
flumphries of Seattle from sitting 
as judge in contempt proceedings 
against Thorwald Siegfried and fur- 
ther ordered him to show cause on 
October 30 why he should not be 
forever restrained from acting as 
judge in the case. 

Court Justice and Mayor of New York, 
died on September 10 on board the 
steamship "Baltic" on which he had 
embarked in search of health. Death 
was due to heart disease, probably su- 
perinduced by the effect of the bullet 
he carried in the anterior muscles of 
he throat — sent there from the revol- 
ver of a paretic three years ago, just 
as the Mayor had embarked on a 
North German Lloyd steamship at 
I loboken. 

Surgeon-General Blue of the Pub- 
lic Health Service declared there 
was no cause for alarm in the one 
death from bubonic plague at Mar- 
tinez, Cal. The case is regarded 
simply as a sporadic one, not in any 
way an indication of danger of an 
epidemic, but entirely due to ground 
squirrel infection. For several weeks 
the public health service has been 
making plans for increased activity 
against rodent carriers of the dis- 
ease on the Pacific Coast, and those 
plans are about to be put into execu- 
tion. 

The Police Commission of San 
Francisco, by unanimous vote, has 
adopted a resolution declaring that 
no more liquor licenses are to be 
issued henceforth in what is now 
known as the Barbary Coast district, 
except for "straight" saloons. ,\lso, 
the employment of females is to be 
stopped, and no women will be al- 
lowed to visit the dives. Dancing 
will not be permitted. All of which 
means, if the police are to act in 
accordance with the letter and spirit 
of the resolution, that the Barbary 
Coast is to be put out of business. 

David Lamar, known as the "Wolf 
of Wall Street," appeared before 
the House lobby investigating com- 
mittee and asked the privilege of giv- 
ing testimony explaining the purpose 
Representative Levy had in intro- 
ducing his resolution for the with- 
drawal of all claims by the Govern- 
ment against the United States Steel 
Corporation. The committee agreed 
to take Lamar's request under con- 
sideration. He said the Levy resolu- 
tion "will have the effect of fore- 
closing the fight of the Government 
to collect $25,000,000 from the Steel 
Trust," that sum being the amount 
that the Government will probably 
be able to assess, should its suit be 
successful. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



Arbitration under the Erdman Act 
of the wage demands of 100,000 union 
conductors and trainmen on the for- 
ty-two leading railroads in the East 
started in New York, when the board 
organized, and the opening state- 
ments of the opposing parties were 
made. 

The directors of the Panama-Pa- 
cific Exposition are issuing term 
passes to business agents of trade 
unions and central councils, whicli 
admit those agents to the Exposition 
grounds in the pursuit of their duties 
and to see that only union men are 
employed. 

The German printers in Toledo, 
through their local union, have just 
secured an increase from $18.50 to 
$21.50 per week of forty-eight hours 
for day work and from $21.50 to 
$24.50 for night work. Efforts are 
being continued to unionize other 
offices at present outside the fold, 
and the prospects are bright for the 
accomplishment of that purpose. . 

The last convention of the Inter- 
national Union of Steam and Opera- 
tive Engineers appropriated funds 
and instructed the general executive 
board to make selection of a head- 
quarters city and erect or purchase 
a suitable building, commensurate 
with the needs of the national or- 
ganization. The executive board 
has just purchased a building, lo- 
cated at 6334-8 Yale avenue, Chicago, 
111., which will be the future home 
of the International Union of Steam 
and Operating Engineers and the 
official journal, the International 
Steam Engineer. The journal here- 
tofore has been published in Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

Writs were served by United 
States marshals on eight banks in 
Hartford, Conn., demanding payment 
from garnisheed funds of the $275,- 
000 treble judgment given a year 
ago to D. E. Loewe & Sons, the scab 
hatters of Danbury, when they won 
their twelve-year struggle against the 
United Hatters of North America 
and the American Federation of La- 
bor, which financed the well-known 
hatters' boycott contest. The case, 
which has had two trials in Hart- 
ford in the United States Court, 
and has twice been to the United 
States Supreme Court, is now before 
the United States Circuit Court of 
Appeals, and the banks will oppose 
the writs on the deposits of the 
union men, which have already 
earned in interest $20,000, until final 
adjudication in New York City next 
winter. 

Secretary of the Navy Daniels is 
said to have abandoned the idea of 
giving navy yard employes represen- 
tation on the various wage boards. 
He announced to-day that in order 
to determine a more equitable basis 
on which to figure navy yard wages 
he will ask the Secretary of Labor 
to ascertain the wages paid by civil 
establishments in the vicinity of the 
various yards for work similar to 
that done in the yards. After a con- 
ference with yard employes last 
spring, Mr. Daniels said he favored 
representation of the employes on 
wage boards. But it was found that 
civil establishments would make 
known their wage lists only on con- 
dition that they be regarded as con- 
fidential, and demurred against giv- 
ing information which would be re- 
ported to labor organizations through 
labor representatives on the wage 
boards. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Lottoii? at tlie San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for tiiree 
montlis only ana will be returned to tlie 
Post Office at tlie expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. >Iolt. Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Albert 



Edward, 
Pred 



-1765 

Kristin 11 
Alex 
Arnold 
Arvid 

Carl 



Alexi. Hakon 
Alhstroni, K. 
Alver, Ben 
Andersen, A 
Andersen 
Andersen, Carl 

Osker 
Andersen 

ISflG 
Andersen 
Andersen, H. J. 
Andersen. -1526 
Andersen. 
Andorsen. 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, David 
Anderson. Ernest 
Anderson, F. 
Anderson, G. 
Baers, M. 
Bakher, Haakon 
Ballot, John 
Barton, W. F. 
Baumert, -2024 
Bausbeck. Erwln 
Bc<kly, Chr. 
Begs. John 
Behrens, Herman 
Bekker, George 
Beling, Oscar 
Bellos, .Tack -2036 
Bendsen, Harry 
Bendtsen, Henry, 

1693 
Benson, A. 
Benson, Helge 
Benson. John E. 
Bentfr, Henry 
Bentsen, Lars 
Berg, Julius 
Bergman, Waldemar 
Bcrgslrom, C. 
Berg(iuist. Emil 
Berlin. Werner 
Bernhard, Oscar 
Caine, V. 
Gallon, Jose 
Cambrou, G. C. 
C'aniplu-l. Geo. 
CaniplicI, 'Will. H. 
Cannon, Alex. 
Cannon, Ed. 
Carlsin. Sliure F. 
Carlson, Axel 
Carlson, Gustag 
Carlson, llenning 
Carlson, Julius 
Cail.son, O. S. 
Carroll, A. R. 
Chaler. Buntista 
Clierniavsky, M. 
Dahler, H. N. 
Dahlgren, Niels 
Delias, James 
Dehler, Alfred 
Pe.sair, Martin 
Dillon, Patrick 
ricering, Erith 

Dohmann, 

Dories, H. 
Econen, Albert 
Edgerlon, Jack 
Kdlund, Konrad 
Bgeland, O. O. 
Kinardt, John 
Kisonbart, H. 
Ekendahl, W. 
Ekwall, Gust 
Blholm, Peter 
Forde, Charles 
Foregn. ■Willlajn 
Foerg, Wm. 
Form, Frank 
Fors, Alfred 
Fiankc, Karl 
Eraser -740 
Fraudsen, L. M. 
Fredrichs, C. 
Garbrick, Luis 
Garrinen, V. 
Geelnian. PJacob 
Gent, Chas. 
Gi'iger. Joe 
Gifford. S. 
Gilholiii. Albin 
Gilje, Sever! n 
Glannus, Alex 
Gorsch, W. 
Gotnian. Joe 
Grana, Collin 
Grant. David 
Grantley, C. M. 
Grauberg, Fred 
Griel, Bernhard 
Grolin, ("onrad 
Haak, R. 
Haaversen. Nils 
H.agelie, Horn 
Haggors, Fred 
Hagstrom, Victor 
Hakassars, A. W. 
Hallgren, -2027 
Hallowis. Louis H. 
Halvorsen, -2229 
Hammel, Otto 
Hannus, Alex 

M. 

Carl 

Chas. G. 

C. T. 

Emanual 

Frank 

Fred 

George 

H. 

H. G. 

I., -2156 



O. 



Hannus, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, 
Hansen, John P. 
Hanson, Mase 
Harlog. John 
Hartman, Fritz 
Hayes, J. B. 
Irwing, James 
Iversen, John 
Jackson, Harry 
Jacobsen, O. F. 
Jade. Hans 
Jamison. J. H. 
Jarl. Haakon 
Jenkins, Fred 



Anderson, Jim 
Anderson, John 
Anderson, Josef 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Peter 
Anderson. S. 
Anderson, Thorus 

H. 
Anderson, TJno 
Anderson, Victoria 
Anderson, Wm. 
-Andcrsson, -17S1 
Aner. Wm. 
Andreasen, -1477 
Andstrom, Axel 
Applequest, Otto 
Apsit, J. 
Arndt, Mike 
Arvldsson, HJalmar 
Asp. G. L. 
Asplund, Karl 
Ayers, W. D. 
Bessisen, Olaf 
Bierstet -1736 

Bilke, Edw. 
Billinston, Martin 
BJornsen, Conrad 
IMair. Francis 
Blank. Georg 
Plindhclni, O. C. 
Blodsing, Aug. 
Bluchner, Frank 
BUickcr, John 
Blumel, W. 
Boe, Karl C. 
Bohm, Eniil 
Boyes, C. 
Bradley, Clifford 
Brander, W. 
Brennel, Woldemar 
Brennusen, Otto 
Brims, H. W. 
Bringarud, Harold 
Broscheid, F. O. 
Brownell, W. 
Bruce, P. 
Brusbard, E. 
Bung, Richard 
Christensen, Albert 
Christensen. .■Vll'red 
Christensen, F. R. 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Otto 
Cliristensen, R. H. 
Christesen, Cristens 
Christiansen. I'lter 
Classon, Henry 
Colburn, Geo. 
Conley, J. H. 
Connor, Wm. 
Cook, Herman 
Corley. Howard 
Crosljy, J. II. 
Cunningham, C. 
Donaldson. F. 
Donovan, .John 
Downey, W. J. 
Dracar, E. 
Dropan, Llhua 
Duka, L. 
Dunbar, L. L. 
Durholt, Hugo 

Elliott, Roney 
Engstrom, Ernest 
Eriksen -770 
Erickson, Eric 
Ericson, E. R. 
Eriksson, Conrad 
Erland. Osk.ir 
Eskildson, Nils P. 

Fredrlckson, Carl 
Freeman, C. E. 
Fretzen, B. H. 
Frlck, John 
Fridlund, John 
Froberg, Enock 
Frye. Fritz 
Furth, Kicliard 

Gronbek, T. 
<jroEsel, Jasef 
Guander, Chr. 
Gudmundsen, B. 
Gulbrandsen -1009 
Guldbrandscn, Jack 
Gumoes, Frederick 
Gundersen, P. 
Gunn, F. D. 
Guckmann, Ewald 
Gusek, Ben 
Gustafson, G. 
Gustaxsen, Olaf 
Guthre, R. 
Gutman, Jack 
Gutman, C. 

Heart, Charles 
Helberger, M. 
Held. H. J. 
Heinig, J. 
llein, Paul 
Helsten, Gus 
Helt, I. 

Hendrikson, G. 
Hendry, John 
Hendriksen, T. 
Henriksen. H. -1333 
Hermanson -1622 
Hess, Wm. 
Hewitt 

Hillig. Albert 
Hofer, Richard 
Hofgaard, Hans 
Hogan, A. 
Hooner, Harbert 
Hoppner, Albert 
Hopstad. Sigurd 
Hoye. Haakon 
Hrelja, Joseph 
Hubertz, Emil 
Huntsman, Henry 
Hurst, Jack 

Iverson, Tom 

Jensen, G. 

Jensen, George 

.Tansen, Hans 

Jensen, Ole 

Jensen, Oscar 

Jensen, C. 



Jensen, H. R. 

Jensen, Jens 

Jensen, L. 

Jensen, Robert 

Jepsen. S. W. 

Johansen. Arthur 

Johansen. August 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen, 

Johansen. 

Johansen, 

Johanson, 

.Johansen. 

Johansen, 

Johanson. 

Johansen, 

Johanson, 

.Inhanson, 

Johansson 



K. 



C. 
Carl 
Chas. 
E. A. 



Johnsen, -1343 

Johnsen, Hans 

.TolinMoii, Bernard 

.lohnson. Berdines 

Johnson, -21«8 

Johnson, C. E. 

Johnson, E. 

Johnson, Eric 

Johnson, H. L. 
Johnson, J. Julius 

Johnson, -420 



Harold V.Johnson, John 



-1593 
-2021 
Ole 
Oscar 
H. B. 
Nils B. 

W. 

-2104 

S. A. 
Johan 



Johnsen, Oscar 
Johnsen -2213 

Kaare, J. 
Knasik. A. 
Kalinert, Walter 
Kalllj.-rg. Arvid 
Kalin. .4ntony 
Kalvetzirjeik, E. 
Karlsen, Gustav 
Kardinal, O. 
Karlsen, Hans 
Karstin. Hugo 
Knysor. Chas. 
Kearns, H. 
Keinanen, Walter 
Kelly. I. F. 



Johnson, O. 
Jonsson, Oscar 
Johnson, P. 
Johnson, Ray 
Johnson, Steve 
Johnsiiii. Thos. 
Joliiisoii. Walter 
Jones. Chas. 
Jorgensen, Andrew 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Jorgenson. Peter 
Julison, C. 
Kirkpatrick. Cycil 
Klatzke, f)lto 
Klausen, C. 
Klinker, C. J. 
Kninling. F. 
Koak. llcrniann 
Kohne, Ernest 
Koop. J. F. 
Kolodriew, Joseph G. 
Krohn, John 
Kristensen. A. 
Kristiansen. Hans 
Kr.sRseth. .-^\eiid 
Kryger, Waldemar 



Kermagoret, AnatoleKuhners, Walter 



Kilgore, George 
I.:iiige. P. H. 
I^angton, Harry 
Lannor, Rudolph 
Laponble, Jean 
Larsen -1692 

Larson, Asmus 
Larson. Erik J. 
L.arsen, Hans 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, L. 
I>arsson, Axel 



Kuhnert, Walter 
I..ekschas3, M. 
Leland. F. W. 
Lind, Gus 
Lindgren. Gus 
Lindholm, Charles 
Liiiil.stroni. Alexan- 
der 
Liscou, C. 
Lister. P. L. 
Luehrs, L. 
Lundberg, Harry 



I'reusse. Fred Funis, Anthoney 

Proschech, Paul Puiitti. A. 

Publlcatus, August Purgold, G. E. 



Lasoi. Conrad Thos.Lundberg Thorsten 



Laughlin, J. M. 
Laurensen, Hugh 
Lauritzcn. Hans 
Laydon. D. 
Leander, Carl 
Lein, G. 
Maatson, Olaf 
Ma.kc. liavid 
Madson, M. C. 
Mahiiquist, Julius 
Manse, Peter 
Ma.stira, Gus. 
Marden, Alfred 
Markni.an, H. 
.Marloii.-i. H. -1S92 
Martensen, I. C. 
Martin, T. K. 
Martin, H. 
Martin, Jack 
Marton, H. 
Mass, Ernst 
.Mathews, John 
iMathisrn. Ludvig 
Matson, Morris 
Mattson, A. M. 
Max, Torwald 
Mayes. J. B. 
Mayers, Edgart J. 
Nanjack, Gustav 
Naystrom, Victor 
Neas. W. 



Lundh, Harry 
Lundmark. Helge 
Lund. William 
Lundfiulst, A. 
Lundqulst. Ernest 
Lyche, H. 
McCarty, P. 
McGaldrich, James 
McKenzie, W. 
McMahon, J. T. 
Meislahn, Hans 
Mollander. G. L. 
Mertens, 11. 
Meyers, W. 
Miclielsen, Alfred 
Milas, Peter 
Miller, W. -2116 
Minor, C. F. 
Moen, Robert 
Mohr, Ernest 
Moller, John 
Monsen, Tollef 
Morris, Oscar 
Morrison, A. 
Morris. Reuben 
Mossier, Larence 
Murphy, Oh. 
Murphy, Edward 
Nick, Peter 
Nielsen, Jacob 
Niel3on, John 



R. 



Neorgaard. Anton C.Nielsen, N. J. 



Neilsen, Edward 
Neilsen, J. C. 
Nelson, C. 
Xelsun, Chas. 
Nelson, Lewis 
Nelson, N. C. 
Nelson, W. 
.N'erbv. Kristian 

Nesbitt, 

.N'est, Filip 
.Newman, F. 
Newman, Tom 
Nielsen, Ed. 
Niel.s.n. H. P. 
Nichander, Dan 
Oberhauser, John 
Oliver, John 
Olman, P. 
Olson, Cliarles 
Olsen, Cliarles A. 
Olsen, Hans -794 
Olsen, O. 
Olsen, Olot D. 
Olsen. Oscar F. 
Olsen, Oscar Wll- 

helm 
Olsen, Marlmus 
Olsen, P. 
Olsen, -845 
Pahlgren, Pete 
I'aludan, C. 
I'arker. John M. 
I'ar.soiis. Herman 
Patterson, P. A. 
Paulsen, G. 
Pearson, J. T. 
Pearson, J. S. 
Pedersen, Alfred 
Pedersen -1561 
Pekman, Ernest 
Pelsckhur 
Pennell, Jim 
Pernkl, C. 
Person, Leonard 

John 
Persson, C. -678 
Peters, J. 
Petersen, A. 
Petersen, Axel L. 
Petersen, Carl W. 



Nielsen, Pete 
Nilsen, Anders 
Nilsen, Anton 
Nilsen, N. I. 
Nilson, Axel 
Nolan, George 
Nordling. Sven 
Nordstrom, Victor 
Norman, Fred 
Norri.s. Ed. 
Nurgaard, Anton 
Nybeig, Berger, 

-1146 
Nylund, John 

Olson, Henrik 
Olsson, -677 
Olsson, -1187 
Olsson, C. G. -1101 
O'Neil, Jas. 
Opdcrbeek, Eugene 
Opitz, G. 
Orfano, Vappo 
Osterberg, J. 
Osterhoff. H. 
Otto, Willi 
Owens, Fred 
Owens, John -1158 



C. G. 
Kristian 
L. -1167 
Paul 
Ed. 



Petersen, 
Petersen, 
Petersen, 
Petersen, 
Peterson, _, 
Peterson, H. 
Peterson, Oscar 
Petersson, Chas. 
Pettersen, Fredrick 
Petterson, John G. 
Pettersson, C. H. 
Petron, A. 
Petz, Gottfried 
Pfeifer, B. 
Philips, Max 
Pitkanen, J. W. 
Plas, M. 
Plottner, Fred 
Pock, James 
Poppe. Geo. 
Porin. A. L. 



Raash, Otto 
Kansohl, Emit 
Uasinussen. Andrew 
Hebnian, Chas. 
Itedmond, Th. 
Reinhold. Ernest 
Rellas, Jack 
Ueshe, G. H. 
Revldan, John 
Hiohter. Niels 
Riegel. AV. -1070 
Rivera, A. 
Roalsen, Fred 
Robertson. John H. 

Saalman, Joseph 
Sack. Hans 
Sahnke. Otto 
Salo, Yrjo 
Palzer. .Julius 
Sane. T. 
Sammis, C. J. 
Samuels, Harold 
Sainuelseii. Leonard 
Sandstrom. E. 
Saide. .\lcx 
Schankat, H. 
Schauer. A. 
Schellenberg, H. 
Scher, G. 
Schmidt, Ernst 
Schmidt. Hans 
Schneider, H. 
Schroder. F. A. 
Schroder, Gus 
Schroder. >1. -2G01 
.'^chropster. E. 
Sriuiltzp. Paul 
Seilerholm. Anton 
Schultz, O. L. A. 
•Seihert. Henry 
Selander, W. 
Senger, George 
Shager, Ernest L. 
Shultman. Jacob 
.Shults. Max 
Sikman, Andrei 
Silva. A. 

Simmonds. William 
Silva. Emil 
Sjarbton, Karl H. 
Skedsmo, A. 
Skoglund. Harry 
Smith, Donald 
Smith, F. O. 
Smith, G. 
.Smith. Johan 

Tahtinen. Hjalmer 
Tammon, Chr. 
'I'heorin. John E. 
Thiriip. K. 
Thoisell, Chas. 
Thorne. Richard 
Thorsclf, Chas. 
Thorsen. Aksel 
'riiorson. Jons 
Tietjen, B. H. 
Tillix, Hans 
Tillman, Andrew 
Tobiasscin, .Joel 
Torgersen, H. 



Rol)eitson. R. 
Rohan. Billy 
Rohlaild, Max 
Rog, A. 
Roman, Hank 
Rosbeik. Gustav 
Rosenfeld, Paul 
Roslln, R. 
Rounborg, Edward 
Rudberg, Charlie 
Rundquist, O. 
Russell, Jim 
Ruute, O. 
Rylke, Otto 

Smyth, Wm. 
Snell. Adolf 
Soder. J. 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sonnenberg, J. 
Sorensen, Hans 
Sorensen, Henry 
Sorensen, John H. 
Sorensen. Michael 
Sorensen, Peter 
Sorensen, Wigo 
Sorers, Hans -2273 
Souka. August 
Sovchnes, P. Olaf 
Spark, .\. V. 
Speikman, Max 
Spillington, S. L. 
Sping. James 
Stahlbaum, Eber- 

hardt 
Staniland. Herbeit 
Staph, Andreas 
Stein. Emil 
Stevenson, August 
Stolt, A. J. 
Stoltzerman, E. 
Strand, Konrad 
Strand, Louis 
.Slrandquist. I^ouis 
Strasdin. Hans 
Strauss. Walter 
Stromsberg. Ivar 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundquist, Ernest 
Svedstrup, E. 
Swanson, Chas. 
Swanson, L. E. 
Swanson. Ole 
Swan, W. S. 
Swarthey, Jack 
Swarthey, Norman 

Torgussen, Andrew 
Torpensen. Guwald 
Torsgren, Carl 
Torstenson, F. 
Tovares, Antonio 
Taivola. G. 
Trede, Hans 
Treucrek 
Truback. H. 
Tuck. W. 
Tulujonscki, Carl 
Tuppit, C. 
Twaig, F. 
Tydeks, CaTl 

Usar, T. 



Uhlig, Carl 
Ursln. J. 

Vaks. Theodore K. Velure, Hllge 

V.ing, Julius Volkanen, Veda 

ValttI, Jalmar Void. O. P. 

Van Kat\Cyk, John Vortinan. W. 

Van Rosnalen. Voss, Helnrich 



Walch, Michael 
Waldhouse, John 
Wall us, Fred 
Walters. Fred 
Wells. Frank 
Walters, Henry 
Wathsted, Albert 
Wattl, Jalmar 
Weiss, V. 
Welch, L. 
Wendel, Emil 
Werth, Gustav 
Westman, Andrew 

Yanger, I. 

Zazau, J. 
Ziehr, Ernest 
Zoe, Frank 
Zorb. W. 



Woitgren, 1. M. 
Weyer, Paul 
Whinner. W. 
Whiteworth 
Wilehlm. Edward 
Williams, Thomas 
Willnian, Frank 
Wilson, Harry 
Wilson, John E. 
Winblact, M. M. 
Winther, Johan 
Wolferen, Svan 

Yoivola, Gust 
Zorlng, Arthur 
Zunbauer, Karl 
Zunk, Rumo 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Paclflo. 



.\nder3on, A. 
Anderson, Anders 
.\n(lerson, Hans 
Balda. A. 
Bay, George 
Brander, M. F. 
Buas, Toinas 
Christoffersen, Olaf 
Ellefsen. Otto 
Faulkner, J. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Ginnoes, F. 
Gustavsen, Alfred 
Hansen, Chr. M. 
Hansen, Karl 
Iversen, Reidar 
Johanson, Nils A. 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
Jorgensen. Oluv 
Kaasik. August 
Kardinal, Otto 
Karsten, Hugo B. 
Katwijk, J. W. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Korsberg, Wolniar 



Larsen, Hans 
I>aydon, D. 
LIndroth, Erik 
Lundgren, K. G. 
Maatson, Olaf 
Nelsson, Hasmund 
Nordling. Svon 
Olsen, -1244 
Olson. Olaf 1). 
Prieberg, P. 
Publlcatus. August 
Punis, Antony 
Quarsell, Wm. 
Raasch, O. 
Rasmussen, Ei. 
Rose. Wm. H. 
Rutter, T. 
Straus, Walter 
Summers, James 
Torkildsen, Jonas 
Trondsen, J. M. 
Wakely. R. B. 
Walters, -Albert B. 
Welsen, Julius 
Wlllander, -876 



All Aboard! 
SEABOARD HOTEL 

228 East Street, near Howard 

New Seven-story Concrete Building — Modern and Up-to-Date 

250— ROOMS— 250 



Running Hot and Cold Water in Every Room 

Free Shower and Tub Baths 

ELEVATOR SERVICE— ELECTRIC LIGHT 

Call Bell in Every Room — Fine Lobby and Reading Room 



Open All Night 

35c to $1.00 per Day $2.00 to $4.00 per Week 



f 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Gal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt 

and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30, 1913: 

Assets $55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 
Employees' Pension Fund.. 158,261.32 
Number of Depositors 62,134 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. 
for receipt of deposits only. 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 




CAPT. CHAS. J. 
SWANSON 

Classy Clothier 

Hatter and Furnisher 

Douglas Shoes 

Uniforms 



Gold Braid and Gold 

Wreaths of All 

Descriptions 



139 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and 
Washington 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 1082 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 

400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Kearny 2603 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 E^ast St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 
Hot and Cold Water in Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

Telephone Kearny 1634 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelope* 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Price*. Reliable Good*. 

50 East St., and 4 Mis&ion St., 
San FrancUco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



B. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat tiiis Label is 
on tlie Keg or Bottle 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




\ 

•Me 

AND 

Porter 



^O^o OFAMERia rXc^ 

COPTRIGHT STRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 



^^ |K i» ^'"^ W^^^ ^;^ *~^ ^-^ See that this label (in light 
^^ j^^i B^ J I^T ^||^ fc^^ ^^^ blue) appears on the box in 



which you are served. 



Issued by AuUloril/of uie Cigar MaKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(Ito dfrtif if:J, Tim «» Oitn OTKineil inlhlj Vm haw ban nwtt byi IllS-ClfiS HbnUffll 

a KtKStR OF IHC OCAB MA<f RJ 'IPnOKATIOIttL UKION t< ArMfKa, >n niuiiubm devoted tt Die ad- 

vdnctmtnl of Itic M0BAI..MATESIA1 jnd INIHIXCTIWI WdfARI Of m£ CRAfT. ll»™fore«m«coill»olll 

theu Ciur^ U> iH sittAv^ Oirowhout 1M Morld 

' 411 Wru^vSMUUPOfltiuUiMf wlTbepunuMMCcrdinQtoUM 



F«C 
*»• SIMILE 



v curuof. 



'c®^\;awo\a*j,;t'*!y^^^^^^y^a»y}«5s»j'::«?^ 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



W. Kahlberg. No. 688. and C. Moii- 
sen, No. 1964, are inquired for at 
the Standard Oil Company's office, 
at San Francisco. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't., No. 1 State 
street. New York. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francuco 

Phone Douglaa 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

Carlsen ^ Marchand 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 
Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 
10 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Bet. East and Steuart Sts. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Lasker Munter, of Spokane, Wash- 
ington, born 1884, left home in 1903, 
is inquired for by his father, Adolph 
Munter, Spokane, Washington. 

John Hansen, who was lookoutman 
on the S.S. "Argyll" some months 
ago, is wanted by the Union Oil Co. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify the manager Marine 
Department, Mr. Walter G. Tubby, 

Anyone who was on the schooner 
"Americana" on January 29, when 
Louis Buttner was injured, is respect- 
fully requested to communicate with 
the injured man. Address Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 
Cal. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION NADC 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., liANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas KSO 



,^^^A^^^A^/V>A^V*AA/VS/NA^S/>/>^N/VNi*WNi^V^^*^N,^ 



OFTHE 



OVERALLS 

DEMAND THE BRAND 



Neustadter Bros. 

bAN FRANCISCO NE.W YORK PORTLAND 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Johan Nilsen, a native of 
Sandefjord, Norway, aged about 33, 
left his home at 1164 Potrero Ave., 
Sunday, August 17th. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Coast Seamen's Journal. 




Thirty earthquake shocks were felt 
recently at Fort de France, Mar- 
tinique. 

German Socialists, in convention 
assembled at Jena, voted against a 
proposition to call a political strike. 

It is announced $1,000,000 has 
already been pledged for a private 
German exhibit at the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition. 

Plans are being prepared to pro- 
vide London with a $1,000,000 opera 
house for the masses, with seats sell- 
ng as low as 12 cents. 

The possibility of joint military 
action by Turkey and Bulgaria 
against Greece was discussed in Con- 
stantinople. 

The airman, Noel, made a world's 
record at Hendon, England, by car- 
rying seven passengers in an aero- 
plane. 

Princess Sophia, of Saxe-Weimar, 
committed suicide by shooting her- 
self with a revolver. She wished 
to marry against her father's wishes. 

Japan's drastic methods in claim- 
ing redress of China have inspired 
a movement in Russia for an entente 
with the United States on the Far 
East. 

Professor Malladra, in his descent 
into Mount Vesuvius, reached a 
depth of 1200 feet and succeeded in 
registering a temperature of 626 de- 
grees Fahrenheit. 

Pegoud, the French airman, who 
recently flew upside down, describ- 
ing a capital "S" in the sky, com- 
pleted his program at Buc by "loop- 
ing the loop," executing a perfect 
circle. 

Provisional President Huerta is- 
sued a declaration- to the people of 
Aiexico, in which he said the Gov- 
ernment had no candidate for the 
Presidency and would show no fa- 
voritism. 

Sir Edward Carson, leader of the 
Irish Unionist forces, landed in Bel- 
fast to inspect the volunteer army 
which is being organized in Ulster 
to support the provisional Govern- 
ment if the Home Rule bill is passed. 

Greek authorities at Koritza, in 
Albania, seized the American mission 
school there, the action being part 
of the terrorization to efTect the in- 
clusion of the whole of southern 
Albania in the Kingdom of Greece. 

It appears from a case heard by 
the criminal court at Stade, Ger- 
many, that the fatal explosion which 
took place on board the "Imperator" 
.'\pril 24 last, injuring eight men, 
four of whom have since died, was 
due to a workman trying a cigar 
lighter which caught lire. To avoid 
burning his fingers, the man threw 
tlie box away. It fell on some cot- 
ton waste which ignited. The fire 
spread rapidly and the man responsi- 
ble for the accident took to flight 
and has not been found since. 

The United States Secretary of 
War has asserted that he will di- 
rect an investigation of the allega- 
tions of former officials of the Gov- 
ernment who claim that slavery ex- 
ists in the Philippines. For years 
it has been known that slavery has 
existed, or at least bondage in a 
lesser form. It is said that most 
forms of bondage are based upon the 
contraction of debts by the poor. 
The debtor either in person or 
through his children usually under- 
takes to discharge his debt through 
I)crsonal service to his creditor, and 
infrequently succeeds in getting out 
of debt. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




Business Tips. — Ragman — Any old 
bottles to-day, mum? 

Woman — No, but you might try 
Mr. Soakem's next door; his wife's 
coming back from the seashore to- 
morrow. — Boston Transcript. 



The Safe Way.— "Why don't you 
run for office?" 

"I've thought about it," replied Mr. 
Dustin Stax; "but I'm satisfied to 
subscribe to campaign funds. The 
fact that a man is willing to give 
prizes for airship flights doesn't put 
him under obligations to aviate." — 
Washington Star. 



Timely Aid. — An old colored wom- 
an came into a Washington real es- 
tate office the other day and was 
recognized as a tenant of a small 
house that had become much en- 
hanced in value by reason of a new 
union station in that neighborhood. 

"Look here, auntie, we are going 
to raise your rent this month," the 
agent remarked briskly. 

" 'Deed, an' Ah's glad to hear dat, 
sah," the old woman replied, ducking 
her head politely. "Mighty glad, fo' 
sho', case Ah des come in hyah ter- 
day ter tell you all dat Ah couldn't 
raise hit dis month." — Harper's Mag- 
azine. 



Preferred the Bear. — A gentleman 
from the North was enjoying the ex- 
citement of a bear hunt down in 
Mississippi. The bear was sur- 
rounded in a small cane thicket. The 
dogs could not get the bear out, and 
the planter who was at the head of 
the hunt called to one of the negroes. 

"Sam, go in there and get that bear 
out." 

The negro hesitated for a moment 
and then plunged into the cane. A 
few moments later the negro, the 
bear, and the dogs were rolling upon 
the ground outside. After the hunt 
was over the visitor said to the 
negro: 

"Were you not afraid to go into 
that thicket with that bear?" 

"Cap'n," replied the negro, "it was 
jest dis way: I neber had met dat 
b'ar, but I was pussonally 'quainted 
wid de old boss, so I jest naturally 
took dat b'ar."— Montreal Herald. 



An Invitation 

We Invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth, 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cat. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL, 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be. even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 




Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Oeodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 




MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN & CO. 

Baltimore ClotHing^ Co. 

72 EAST STREET, S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 



Demand the Union Label 



UNION 




Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 








Eyes Examined Free Repairing Our Specialty 

WE DO REPAIRING 
JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 Market Street., Near Call Building 

2593 Mission Street, Near 22nd Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

THE LARGEST JEWELRY STORE, WITH THE LARGEST 
STOCK AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



'WeiD Rttail Center" 




^Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H. SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

Has Moved from 610 THIRD ST. to 

693 THIRD ST., opposite the 

Southern Pacific Depot at 3d 

and Townsend Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

Furnishing Gooda, Hata, Capa, Tninka, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clothing. Seamen's Out- 
flts a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at the 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for the Nam^ 
and Number. 



CJBfrBusrtn 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



Si 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of th« International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVII, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1913. 



Whole No. 2247. 



CONDITION OF GERMAN SEAMEN. 



Paul Muller, Secretary of the German Sea- 
men's Union, contributed the following instruct- 
ive article upon the condition of seamen in 
Germany to the recent convention reports of 
the International Transport Workers' Federa- 
tion: 

The life of the German sailor to-day is almost 
devoid of pleasure but abounds in all kinds of 
hardships. Hardships, in respect to natural hu- 
man welfare, far worse than the common priva- 
tions of the rest of the workers, both in their 
social and industrial life, and produced by en- 
tirely different causes. They are the result 
partly of the special characteristics of naviga- 
tion and partly of the accompanying difficulties 
of the trade. The progress of engineering and 
the general ever-advancing modernization of 
German navigation have not in any way im- 
proved the lot of the German sailor, rather have 
they made it more difficult and intolerable. Al- 
ready we see the results: the steady speeding 
up which is taking place in the modern steam- 
ship service, and the excessive severity and 
strain which is growing up in connection with 
the performance of duty on board ship — a strain 
which must increase almost automatically in 
view of the continual weakening of the manning 
strength of steam and sailing ships of our Ger- 
man Merchant Service. This is the beginning 
of the pitiless exploiting of the sailor and his 
working power; the drawbacks in the sailor's 
occupation clearly reveal themselves here. 

In every respect the sailor's conditions have 
developed in quite the opposite direction to the 
general development of the German Merchant 
Service. With 4675 large ocean-going vessels 
having an aggregate registered tonnage of 2,- 
903,570 tons and employing 73,993 men, the 
German Merchant Service occupies an important 
position in the lines of the world's commercial 
fleets. The world totals in 1911 represented 
30,087 ships with 43,147,154 tons register. 

The present day position, economic, social, 
and legal, of the German sailor does not cor- 
respond in the least with the claims and con- 
ditions of modern times. In this respect one 
can say that there has been no development 
or at least that if there is any development it 
is quite out of step with present day progress 
and especially is it out of touch with modern 
sentiments of justice and society. The deeds, 
dangers and sacrifices in a sailor's life are under- 
valued, indeed they are given a very insignificant 
value. 

In 1888 there were 854 accidents in the German 
Merchant Service of which 654 resulted in more 
or less serious injuries and 200 in death. In 
1910 these figures had swelled to 3397 acci- 
dents, of which 3026 resulted in injuries and 371 
in deaths. From 1888 to 1910 there is an ag- 
gregate of 59,917 accidents with 50,420 resultant 
injuries and 9,515 deaths: — The sailors' sacrifice 
of life and health on the world battlefield of 
labor where they have served as the slaves of 
the shipowners. 

Regarding the buijding up of the economic, 
social and legal position of the seamen a survey 
of past years with their changed economic rela- 
tions reveal that in respect to the increased 
needs and claims of civilization absolutely in- 
sufficient attention has been paid to them. 

Work periods of 14 to 18 hours a day are by 
no means rare even to-day in the shipping trade, 
although the regulations for sailors prescribe 



a ten, and in the tropics, an eight-hour day. 
Positively brutal is the arbitrariness with which 
the payment for overtime is calculated, although 
the payment for overtime is only 40 Pfg. (about 
5 d.) an hour at most, that is about 25 per cent, 
to 30 per cent, too low. In the larger North 
Sea and Baltic harbors the average monthly 
wages are: 

Class North Sea Baltic Sea 

M M 

Boatswain 85 to 110 75 to 85 

Ship's Carpenter 80 to 110 75 to 78 

Seamen A. B 65 to 75 65 

Sailors 40 to 45 40 to 45 

Stokers 75 to 95 65 to 70 

Trimmers 55 to 75 45 to 48 

Boys 15 to 25 15 to 20 

Cooks — 75 to 80 

Stewards — 50 to 75 

Thanks to tlie influence of the organization 
wages have risen during the last 15 years by 
25 per cent, to 30 per cent., and the fluctuations 
in the amount of wages which were so preva- 
lent one time have been steadied, though they 
still prevail in certain grades. Wages are really 
lower. On the one hand they are out of all 
proportion to the present day's tasks of the 
sailors and on the other hafid they have not 
been increased so as to keep step with the 
enormous increase in the cost of living. When 
calculated and compared on a percentage basis 
they are far behind the wage increases of indus- 
trial workers, especially when compared with 
Dockers. 

Certainly the cost of living on board ship 
must be added to the wages. The cost of living 
is estimated by the employers at 1.25 Mk. per 
man, per day. By the authorities at 1.50 Mk. 
If the one or the other reckoning is taken we 
shall not decide whether the one or the other 
is too high or too low. The cost is as miserable 
in the one case as in the other. Criticism is 
directed not only against the quality and quan- 
tity but also against the manner in which the 
food is prepared. Incapable and unwilling cooks 
increase the cost and at the same time reduce 
the value of the food. 

In favorable circumstances a stoker on the 
North Sea can make, including food and over- 
time pay, from 1400 to 1450 Mk. a year (roughly 
20 marks eoual 20/ — ) a seaman A. B. 1000 to 
1050 Mk. In the Baltic: — Stokers and seamen 
A. B. 950 to 1000 Mk. A German sailor nowa- 
days cannot put in more than 9 or 10 months 
in the year. A yearly income for stokers and 
seamen A. B. including cost of food and over- 
time pay should be a minimum of 1800 to 2000 
(stokers and seamen working 9 or 10 months 
on the North and Baltic Seas). 

Although the professional "sharks" are being 
more and more repressed, especially in the large 
ports, they exist in the neighborhood of em- 
ployment offices and inflict horrid abuses on 
the sailors, especially in the offices of the ship- 
owners. An absolutely shameless tyranny on 
the part of the officials prevails, and moreover 
the system of Identification ' cards and the 
blacklist flourishes. Only an impartial manage- 
ment of the employment offices can bring about 
a change here. 

Since 1910 the German sailors have made 
scarcely any changes or secured any improve- 
ments worthy of notice, although the develop- 



ment of the German Merchant Service and with 
it German navigation has made a permanent 
advance. 

During 1911 and up to January 1, 1912, there 
was a total of 3721 accidents resulting in 3296 
injuries and 225 deaths. From 1888 to 1911 
there was a total of 63,638 accidents, of which 
53,698 resulted in injuries and 9940 in deaths. 

In 1912 the German Merchant Service em- 
ployed 75,130 men; 61,067 sailors, and 14,063 of- 
ficers. The Merchant Service comprised 1000 
sailing ships with 432,168 reg. tonnage and 1412 
steamships with 4,160,927 reg. tonnage. In a 
corresponding manner Germany has steadily in- 
creased her position in the ranks of the world's 
commerce in respect to imports and exports, as 
a result of which profits have grown enormously 
for the German shipowners. But in spite of this 
the purely economical concessions of the German 
shipowners to the sailors are comparatively few. 

In 1910, 1911, 1912, comprehensive movements 
by the sailors took place which, with the ex- 
ception of Stettin, 1910, and Bremerhaven-Nord- 
enham-Geestemunde (Steam Trawler Crews) in 
1911, were all successful and carried through 
without a strike. In the wage movements of 
1911-12 the sailors in all the large ports on the 
Baltic and North Seas were interested. For 
about 25,000 to 30,000 participants an increase of 
2,500,000 marks a year was secured. The increase 
in profits of the German shipowners in 1912 
alone amounted to 40-50 million marks. 

The results of social legislation and the efiforts 
of the sailors in the wage movements of 1910- 
1912 affected the sailors to such a slight extent 
that we do not propose to give any particular 
consideration to them here. The organization 
conditions of the large and small shipowners 
of Germany must be regarded too as admirable 
from every point of view. 

The Central Organization of the German 
.Shipowners affiliated with the Shipping Federa- 
tion has very quickly developed and at least 
85 per cent, of all German shipowners are pay- 
ing members of this union — an employers' or- 
ganization with which, for good or evil, we must 
reckon with in economic fights. We do not 
know whether any changes have taken place in 
this organization between 1910 and 1912 of a 
national or international character, as they do 
not allow the public to become acquainted with 
their activities. A change has come over their 
tactics in opposing the sailors' movement in 1912 
wlien the Central Management of the District 
Owners' Unions gave them the power to make 
the necessary concessions themselves in any 
movements carried out by our organization. 
The Steam Trawler Owners even were granted 
the right to make the Elbc-Weser Tariff Agree- 
ment with our union. 

It is the chief aim of the Central Owners' 
Union to prepare measures and set up regula- 
tions so as to bring the sailors in every way 
under their control and to keep them there. 

It has established employment agencies in all 
large ports, even in foreign countries. It patron- 
izes the agreeable and smooth-tongued "sharks" 
and carries out a united control of seamen by 
means of so-called cards of identification in al- 
most all harbors. The North German Lloyd 
.".nd the Ilamburf-America Lines employ sev- 
eral hundred men on their ships on a yearly 
contract, an example which the other ship- 
(Continued on Page 11) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BY THE WAY. 



The poor we won't have always with 
us ; nor the "respectables." The co-opera- 
tive commonwealth is on its way here. 
When it comes the tapeworms of '"sassiety" 
will o;o. They will go because that on 
uliioli they subsist, special privileges and 
"frenzied finance," will have no abiding 
place in the rejuvenated body politic. With 
their going the poor will begin to. fatten 
u]). Fat and poverty are incompatibles. 
AVherefore prosperity will in that day be 
the established order of Society. It will 
be the real article, too; not the counter- 
feit presentment held up t.o us by the 
prostituted press of to-day. So gird up 
your loins, brother, and help hasten the 
coming of the co-operative commonwealth. 
Even if you should peg out before it 
comes, it is surely ever so much more 
satisfying to die fighting for the cau«e 
of freedom than to slave your life away 
in the service of capitalism. Be of the 
Patrick Henry mold — "Give me liberty ot 
give me death !" 



The Demon Profit blights everything 
which it touches. Cold storage should be 
a great public benefit. But capitalism has 
made it a gigantic instrument for public 
exploitation. In Kansas City, Mo., foi 
instance, the State food inspector found 
12,000,000 rotten eggs in cold storage. 
These eggs could all have been sold when 
fresh. But that would have caused a 
decided drop in the market price of eggs. 
There is more profit in holding a certain 
percentage of the available supply out of 
the market, even if they do rot. Rotten 
eggs can always be readily sold to the 
bakers. They go into pies and cakes which 
you and I will eat — if we have the price. 
Capitalism is "full o' them tricks," every- 
one a money-maker guaranteed under the 
pure fraud law. Yes, friends, it's "a 
rotten old world," all right, as that poor 
suicide down in Los Angeles the other 
day said it was. And rotten cold storage 
eggs are but a small drop in the bucket 
of its rottenness. 



Seven thousand women wage earners in 
Kansas City receive less than $6 a week 
for their work. Also in one of the "pros- 
perity organs" of that city there appeared 
not very long ago a cartoon showing 
Giant Prosperity chasing Pigmy Pessimist 
out of town, a bunch of wellfed-looking 
individuals vociferously cheering the big 
stiflF. 

N. B. — The employers of those seven 
thousand women workers are a unit in 
declaring that a minimum wage law would 
not benefit the women in the least. 



Unemployment and the general cost of 
living have both increased approximately 
60 per cent, since 1900. In the same 
period of time the number of trusts and 
the amount of watered stocks have more 
than doubled. So you see, there has been 
an increase all along the line of P r o s - 
p e r i t y; for that is what the moklcrs 
of our opinions call it. 



Better a horny-handed worker than a 
stony-hearted shirker. 

El TunRTo. 



DECENTRALIZATION. 



The I. W. W. appears to have evolutcd 
to a stage where the famous Donnybrook 
fair looks like a Sunday-school picnic in 
comparison. First of all there exists an 
im])assable gulf between the Detroit and 
Chicago factions. 

The former is a rather insignificant but 
noisy aggregation and refers to the latter 
as the "bummery." There are hardlv 
enough members left in the Detroit wing 
to start a healthy fight among themselves, 
but the Chicago followers are engaged in 
a free-for-all that is quite annising, and 
predictions are freely made that another 
split is impending. 

W. E. Trautman, ex-secretary of the 
Chicago faction of the I. \\'. \\'., has been 
mussing things in the East, and while he 
was hurling brickbats in several different 
languages, which caused the warriors in 
many places to choose sides and leap into 
the fray, another row broke out in the 
West. 

Fellowworker Smith was kicked out of 
the edit(jrship of the Industrial Worker, 
which is owned by the organization and is 
published at Spokane, Wash. Smith, who 
is charged with having stolen the mailing 
list of the Worker, immediately started an- 
other paper and formed an alliance with 
two other "privately owned organs," one 
in New York and the other in Louisiana, 
and the three are now bombarding the 
chief officials of the Chicago faction and 
are backed by many locals in various i^arts 
of the country. 

)*leanwliile the \\'orker, floundering 
along under a thousand-dollar debt, sus- 
pended publication for several weeks and 
has just reappeared, filled with denuncia- 
tions of the "chairwarmers" and "spittoon 
philosophers." We gather from the Worker 
that the latter gents subsist upon handouts 
and camp in headquarters in various cities 
and towns, and inform the casual visitor 
that they refuse to work in order to starve 
the capitalists into submission. 

They have raised a new issue called "de- 
centralization," and it works remarkably 
well, as they have decentralized thousands 
of members in Spokane, for example, to 
the point where only about forty-eight are 
left. Similar reports come from other 
places, as well as charges of treason and 
other high crimes among local leaders,, 
some of whom are suspected of being de- 
tectives in disguise. 

The convention of the I. \\'. \\'., now 
in session, is a lively afifair — in fact, judg- 
ing from all appearances, there will be at 
least two or three more factional organiza- 
tions formed while scalping is still good. — 
Duluth Labor World. 



The wreck of the German five-masted 
sailing ship "Preussen," oflf Dover, is rapid- 
ly disappearing. Another mast has been 
removed by the firm that is breaking up 
the ship, and there now remain but three. 
The old ship will figure in cinematograph 
films for some time to come, for a film was 
taken of the supposed crew of the "Preus- 
sen" being rescued. Some forty actors 
dressed in oilskins took part, and a man 
was hauled ashore from the wreck by a 
line. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



STIMULANTS TO PATRIOTISM. 

A number of cases of severe punishment 
of enlisted men in the army are being re- 
l)orted from time to time, and a few of 
them are cited in a recent issue of The 
Public, as follows: On August 29 Clarence 
L. George, a private in Company U of the 
Signal Corps was sentenced to a year in 
the military prison and given a dishonor- 
able discharge for no other oflfense reported 
than that he had written a letter to the 
President's private secretary, Mr. Tumulty, 
telling about ill-treatment at the hands of 
his superior officers. \o denial of the 
truth of his statement seems to have been 
made. The charge on which he was con- 
demned w^as that of writing letters over 
the heads of his superiors. Another sol- 
dier, Waldo II. Cofifman, was sentenced to 
the i)enitentiary by a military court mar- 
tial on August 17 at Fort Stevens, Oregon. 
Xo report of the proceedings has ajipeared 
in the daily jiress. Coffman was charged 
with speaking disrespectfully of the flag. 
This he denied, and the claim has been 
made in his behalf that his prosecution 
was political, he having become a Socialist 
since his enlistment. On September 21 
the War Department in reply to Congress- 
men who questioned it concerning the case 
declared that Waldo had been sent to the 
penitentiarj' for speaking in a manner 
which the court-martial held to be foul 
and unpatriotic, and also for alluding of- 
fensively to the late Vice-President Sher- 
man. Three other soldiers, all said to be 
Socialists have been convicted and sen- 
tenced on charges based on i)rivate ex- 
pressions of opinion. 



PUBLIC LANDS FOR ENTRY. 



Three quarters of a million acres of pub- 
lic lands in the Ignited States were re- 
stored to entry last month. These restora- 
tions were based upon recommendations 
made by the United States Geological Sur- 
vey as a result of its classification work 
in the Western States. The only area with- 
drawn was one of 235 acres in California, 
temporarily reserved from entry because 
of its possibilities for developing water 
power. The largest restoration was in 
Montana, where 525,747 acres were re- 
stored to public entry as the result of coal 
cla'^sifications completed. In addition to 
this, restorations of coal land involving 
214,742 acres were made in Colorado, New 
Mexico, North Dakota, Utah and Wyom- 
ing. In California, Idaho, Oregon and 
Washington, 7,824 acres heretofore reserved 
for water power were restored, examina- 
tion having indicated they are not valua- 
ble for the purpose for which they were 
withdrawn. 

.About 83,600,000 acres of land have now 
been classified as to their coal content; 61,- 
484.032 acres have been classified as non- 
coal land and less than 20,000,000 acres 
have been classified as coal land and values 
of over $760,000,000 placed upon them in 
accordance with the provisions of the coal- 
land law and the Department regulations. 
The remainder has been restored without 
classification. 

The Survey has also classified as non- 
irrigable and designated for entry under 
the enlarged-homestead acts more than 
200,000,000 acres of lands in those Western 
States to which the 320-acre homestead 
principle has been extended by Congress. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



How Living Increased. 

'J'he United States Bureau of Labor has 
just issued a report illustrating in a stri- 
king and forcible manner the extraordinary 
increase in living expenses for the period 
of twenty-three years and four months, 
1890 to April, 1903. It covers fifteen ar- 
ticles, that represent approximately two- 
thirds of the expenditure for food by the 
average workingman's family, and reports 
of retail prices are included from thirty- 
nine industrial cities, in which live one- 
fifth of the population of the United States. 
The increase in several expenses, as will be 
observed, is more than 100 per cent. The 
following table shows a percentage of in- 
crease, and will, no doubt, be read with 
very much interest: 

April, 
Articles. 1890. 1913. 

Sirloin steak 99.3 172.7 

Round .steak 97.6 199.1 

Rib roa.st 98.7 173.4 

Pork chops 96.5 218.0 

Bacon, smoked 96 5 222.9 

Ham, smoked 98 3 178.1 

Lard, pure 98.5 166.8 

Hens 102.8 179.7 

Flour, wheat 110.2 127.2 

Cornmeal 101.3 155.1 

Eggs, strictly fresh 100.3 126.4 

Butter, creamery 99.2 161.3 

Potatoes, Irish 109.0 119.2 

Sugar, granulated 120.8 92.7 

Milk, fresh 100.4 139.4 



July Immigration. 
The total number of immigrants land- 
ing at the various ports of the United 
States during July, 1913, was 138,244. 
Southern Italians still head the procession, 
29,739 having landed during July. The 
next in numerical order was Polish, 21,671. 
Next came the Hebrews, with 16,645, and 
then follows Germans, 6,382 ; Russians, 
6,352 ; Ruthenians, 5,901 ; Croatians and 
Slovenians, 5,698; English, 4,684; Northern 
Italians, 3,731; Lithuanians, 3,973; Slovaks, 
3,485, the balance coming from twenty- 
eight different countries. According to oc- 
cupations given, of the total number, 40,113 
are farm laborers, with 25,237 designated 
as laborers, and 14,273 designated as ser- 
vants. According to trades, there were ad- 
mitted 3,317 Tailors, 1,951 Carpenters and 
Joiners, 1,452 Shoemakers, 688 Blacksmiths, 
949 Dressmakers, 823 Miners, 358 Weavers, 
509 Bakers, 380 Locksmiths, 250 Machin- 
ists, 886 Masons, 113 Printers, while all of 
the other trades received small contribu- 
tions. There were debarred for cause 2,708, 
the largest number being debarred as "like- 
ly to become a public charge," 1,109. Dur- 
ing the month of July emigrant aliens de- 
parted from this country to the number of 
26,434. The total number of immigrant 
aliens landing at the ports of the United 
States during the fiscal year ended June 30, 
1913, was 1,197,892. During that same pe- 
riod the record for departures by emigrant 
aliens was 308,190. This leaves a total net 
immigration of 889,702. The States to 
which the July immigrants were destined 
are, in part, as follows: New York, 39,527; 
Pennsylvania, 23,476; Illinois, 12,862; Mas- 
sachusetts, 9,997; Ohio, 8,055; Michigan, 
7,005; New Jersey, 6,816; Connecticut, 4,- 
242, the balance of the immigrants being 
routed to the rest of the States. During 
the fiscal year just closed. New York ad- 
ded 330,531 aliens; Pennsylvania, 182,744; 



Illinois, 107,060; Massachusetts, 101,674; 
Ohio, 63,007; New Jersey, 61,358, and 
Michigan, 59,192. During the fiscal year 
America's population was increased by 
264,348 Southern Italians, 185,207 Poles, 
105,826 Hebrews, 101,764 Germans, 100,062 
English, and 58,380 Russians, other na- 
tionalities making up the balance of inimi- 
erants. 



Copper Situation Serious. 

Tiie restriction of output at the Michigan 
copper mines, coupled with a demand which 
gives no sign of abating, is apparently 
looked upon in the engineering world as a 
serious matter. 

"We are at the present time witnessing 
a remarkable situation in copper," says The 
Engineering and Mining Journal, "the 
world's stock having been reduced to the 
lowest figure on record since the American 
statistics have been reported, while the 
demand for consumption continues un- 
abated. The statistical position was al- 
reafly strong before the Michigan strike 
occurred. The cessation of copper from 
that source was felt very quickly, inas- 
much as that copper does not have to be 
refined electrolytically, and goes directly 
from the smelteries near the mines to the 
consumers. Whereas in the case of elec- 
trolytic copper about three months from 
mine to consumer is a normal time. Lake 
copper is ordinarily less than a month in 
transit. 

"It appears now that the Michigan strike 
is going to be a long drawn-out affair. 
Even if it were settled to-morrow it would 
be many months before the former rate of 
production could be regained. Many of 
the mines are filling with water, and the 
exodus of miners from the district will 
produce a shortage of labor that will check 
operations for a long time. Eventually 
the companies probably will have to offer 
higher wages in order to secure the men 
that they want. In the meanwhile the pro- 
ducers of electrolytic copper can offer only 
partial assistance, inasmuch as the refineries 
of the country are already being operated 
at nearly their full capacity. 

"The copper market has consequently 
worked itself into a dangerous position." 



Awful Fatalities, 

In testifying before the arbitrators now 
hearing the evidence in the dispute between 
the railroad firemen and the railroads of 
the East, of which Mr. Seth Low was 
chosen chairman, A. P. Garretson, Presi- 
dent of the Conductors' organization, and 
William G. Lee, President of the Train- 
men's Union, brought out some astonishing 
facts relative to the injury and fatality of 
railroad employes. One of the points em- 
phasized by both of them was the increased 
risk entailed in handling the heavy tonnage 
of a modern railroad train. Mr. Lee said 
that his organization, which includes brake- 
men, flagmen, and baggagemen, had paid 
benefits last year for an average of one 
man killed or totally disabled every seven 
hours and fifteen minutes, and that a man 
was injured every nine minutes, although 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime BIdg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 
Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 
Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 
Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 
DENMARK. 
Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Mriritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centre Maritime dos Empregados cm Caniara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



The organization of British post- 
masters refused to give out any more 
national insurance stamps if they did 
not receive the increase demanded 
for the extra service. 

The Trade Council in Sydney is 
trying to establish a connection be- 
tween the universities and other edu- 
cational institutions and the trade 
unions for the purpose of furthering 
educational and instructional ques- 
tions. 

In order to thwart the movement 
on the part of the United Brickyard 
Owners, in connection with the new 
capital of Australia, the (labor) gov- 
ernment built a large brickyard — 
which also supplies private customers 
— before the last election. 

Ten different trade unions of gas 
and unskilled workers in Great Brit- 
ain, numbering altogether 250,000 
members, and possessing a capital of 
$250,000, have decided in principle 
in favor of amalgamating into one 
united organization. 

One hundred and eleven disputes 
were reported to the French Labor 
Department as having begun in June, 
as compared with 102 in the previous 
month, and 93 in June, 1912. In 101 
of the new disputes 25,360 work 
people took part, as compared with 
10,479 who took part in 90 disputes 
in the previous month, and 12,795 
who took part in 7Z disputes in June, 
1912. The groups of trades in which 
disputes were most frequent were 
building (26 disputes), transport (21), 
textile (20), and metal (14). Of 120 
new and old disputes reported to 
have terminated, 24 ended wholly in 
the favor of the work people, 64 
wholly in the favor of the employers, 
and 22 were compromised. 

The question of organization is be- 
ginning to gain a foothold among 
the telegraph employes in Argen- 
tina. The first telegraphers' organi- 
zation was founded in Buenos Aires 
this year. The society is delighted 
with the influence it is beginning 
to work among the telegraphers in 
Buenos Aires, as well as with the 
great organization campaign which 
is being opened up in the provinces. 
The purpose of the organization is 
to regulate the conditions of service 
and the rendering of mutual assist- 
ance. The Argentine Telegraph De- 
partment is doing its best to destroy 
the new organization by victimizing 
its members and leaders. The whole 
of the members of the executive 
board have been transferred to the 
most remote stations in order that 
their influence might not be felt. 

There is a movement afoot in the 
Danish Tobacco Workers' Federation 
to sever this union from the Na- 
tional Center of Trade Unions. The 
reason offered for this is that the 
Trade Union Central had stood in 
the way of the workers during the 
last great movement. The Na- 
tional Center resented this charge 
through its news letter and produced 
documentary evidence proving the 
unjustifiability of same. Altogether 
163,754 kronen have been placed at 
the disposal of the tobacco workers 
by the National Center, which means 
that the tobacco workers have re- 
ceived the full share of strike bene- 
fit to which they were entitled. 
Since the members of the Tobacco 
Workers' Federation voted in favor 
of a settlement with the employers 
by 1,761 to 1,501, the charges of the 
opponents of the "National Center" 
are proved to be groundless. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... gAN PEDRO 



M. BROWN 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

■437 KROINT STREET SAIN PEDRO 



S. G. SWANSON 

^^1 BEST ''Y^^^ TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to Postoffice, 
Los Angeles "Waterfront" 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Kasper Olsen, a native of Fredrik- 
stad, Norway, age about 25, is in- 
quired for. Address Christ Hansen 
Tort Ludlow, Wash. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and ofiFers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 

MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 






WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

W* Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

D«aJar. in 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 

ALEX. K.VNE C. A. BRUCE 

WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

Don't forget the 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 
BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



This is to certify that on the 27th 
day of February, 1911, one Mathias 
Lagman, then nineteen years of age, 
was a seaman on board the S. S. 
"Paloma," Cuban flag; that when said 
vessel was lying at anchor in the 
Port of Cabarian, P. R., at about 8 
o'clock in the evening, Lagman, who 
had been working with other men at 
painting, was walking between decks 
in the dark, when he fell through 
hatch No. 4, which had been left un- 
covered. He was picked up in the 
hold and it was found that he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. This 
young man was subsequently taken 
to Russia, where his mother, who is 
very poor, is taking care of him. 

It is believed that the owners were 
negligent in failing to have the hatch 
covered, and in failing to have or 
furnish proper lighting for the 'tween 
decks at the point where Lagman 
fell. If these facts can be proven, 
some relief might be obtained for this 
unfortunate boy. 

The following are the men who 
signed on the articles with Lagman, 
and who had been working with said 
Lagman: 

C. Jones, C. J. Johnson, F. Johan, 
M. Lanhard, E. Randal, W. Paulson. 

Any seaman who will locate these 
men or send their addresses to the 
Legal Aid Society, No. 1 Broadway, 
New York City, will be doing a 
great favor to said sailor, and to 
S. B. Axtell, attorney-in-charge. 

For similar reasons we desire to 
communicate with the following men 
who were members of the crew of 
the "layman M. Law" in October, 
1911, when Edward S. Tennberg was 
severely injured on the trip between 
Boston and Norfolk: 

Adolph Dittmer, John Olson, Har- 
old Herman, Charles Newberg, James 
J. Kelly. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 
Light and ventilation perfect. 
Cool and pleasant at all seasons. 



CIGARS TOBACCO SOFT DRINKS 

INFORMATION WANTED. 
Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Address 
Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Adolf Theining, a native of Van- 
nersborg, Sweden, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Walter Jorgesen Clang, born in 
.Aaland Yetta, Ostro Yetta, is in- 
quired for by his uncle, John Clang. 
.•\ddress Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Enoch Joseph Horsfold, 18 years 
old, native of New Zealand, please 
communicate with Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

NOTICE. 

Any sailor or fireman having bag- 
gage stored with John Krehmke, 407 
Druinm St., will please call on Mrs. 
John Krehmke, 1209 Central Ave., 
Alameda. Baggage to be kept 60 
days from to-day, then sold to de- 
fray expenses. 

MRS. JOHN KREHMKE, 

1209 Central Ave. (Martin Station), 
Alameda. 



San Pedro Letter Lut, 

Anderson, Gust Kinnar, K. 

Anderson. W. -1630 Kastilulin, Frank 

Annell. Albert Larsen, A. B. 

Anderson, Ernst Laiscn. Axel, -1768 
Anderson, HemmlndL. Edward 

Anderson, Patrick Lindholm, Erik A. 

Anderson, Soren Lass, John 

Alexandersen, Paul LovKrec-n, Otto 

Anderson, O. E., Lauritson, George 

-1762 Lundberg, Carl 

Alilstrom, Anders Lindroth, Gustaf 

Andersen, K. P., l>a.ssen. Johan 

-1717 Leino, G. P. 
Anderson, Ed., -1739Lewls, George 

Anderson, George, Lindeberg. Ernest 

-1.S12 Lemke, Richard 

.'Anderson. Mr. I^ewet, Frenohie 

Htundt, Hugo Linderman, Gust 

Beiirsin, Jacob Lister, W. 

Bergh, Borge Loining. Herman 

Benson. Helge Mayer, W. 

Berhus, Emll Makinen, Oskar 

Buchtman, F. Maatta, John 

Blakstad, Ed. Moulas. Nick 

Cristensen, H. Merleult. Gaston 

-1366 Miller, John 

Carlsson, Aksel Mrikoie. Gustav W. 

-1220 Moureau, H. 

Carlson, Gust. W. Mayers, P. M. 

Carlson, Gustaf Mikkelsen, Harald 

Collins, E. F. Nelsen. Julius 

Dean. J. Norminen. John E. 

Dreger, Jack Nelson. Hans 

Erdt, Anton Olsen, W. 

Ekholm, F. Olsen, Sckutar 

Eriksson, C. -333 Owen, Fred 

Karrell, Henry Olsen, Marlua 

Flelje, Fritz Olsen. Olav 

Falbom. Richard Ostcrberg. John 

Grantley, Mr. Pomaret, Leotard 

Gusek, Hernhard Pedersen, A.. -1564 

Hunt, Gust. Petersen, Aage 

Ilalvorsen, H., 2229 Peterson, 'loin 

Hansen, Nils, -'J!i9 Pedersen, Peder 

Hannus, Alex Phillips, K. 

Hokonsson. Axel Pekman, Ernest 

Hansen, I'oter Repson. E. 

il.jorth. Knut Rantman, Robert 

Hausnian, Mr. Rudowitz, H. 

Hansen, C. Rigneil, J. V. 

Hass, James Saarine, Hemming 

Hansen, Herald .Srhroeder, Ernst 

Hansen. Johannes Stephan, M. 

Helenius. Oskar Sanders, Charles 

Hintza, Yrjo Spieler, Albert 

Iversen, Ivar Sievers, Herman 

Jensen, Jens B. Sihonke. Frank 

Johnson, George Sievers, G. P. 

Jorgensen, Jorgen Thorsen, Joe 

Jones, Eddie Torgersen, .\nton 

Johnson, Gunnar Tiionisen. Th. 

Johnson, H., -2213 Waaland, Lewis 

Johansen, Halvard Wilson, A. 

Jorgensen, Fred Warkala, J. 

Jensen, Jens B. Zoming. Arthur 
Johansson, Fritz W. Packages and 

Jonasson, O. M. Photos. 

Johansen, Walter Larsen, James Chr. 

Kramer, Otto Nordman, John 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Albrect, Chas. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, M. C. 
Andowety, H. 
Anderson, E. 
Anderson, C. E. 
Anderson, E. K. 
Anderson, A. 
Berthelc, M. 
Baker, M. 
Bode, W. 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, A. 
Christensen, A. 
Clausen, J. 
Colbert, M. J. 
Douglas, G. A. 
lOdKcston, C. J. 
Kliiert, An. 
Eaton, Neva I. 
Glaaormither, C. 
Gordon, James 
Hansen, Pet. 
Haraisen, W. 
I lanson, Jorg. 
Hansen, Christ. 
Haven, Francis 
Hevaroso, H. B. 
Hapstad, Sigurd 
Irwin, Robert 
Ivans, Carl 
Trike, Willie 
Jensen, Hans 



Karlson, Hans 
Karlsen, Oskar 
Kjassgaard, Hans 
Langer, Robert 
Laymbrag, H. 
Lintianen, Ernest 
Lindberg, T. 
Ludwigsen, Arne 
Marx, Albert 
Machado, H. 
Mafo, E. S. 
Methenen, E. K. 
Olander, Carl 
Olsen, J. H. 
Person, Edmond 
Pitschkun, W. 
Pelusan. D. E. 
Russell, W. 
Reinlnk, H. 
Rasmundsen, G. 
Silhus, W. 
Slan, C. 
Schiff, Ch. 
Sorensen, E. 
Suvert, H. 
Sjablom, G. 
Stenars, A. W. 
Salversen, S. 
Schates, A. 
Vilvot, J. 
Williamson, R. A. 
Zornow, Herbert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Albert Christensen, native of By- 
rum Laso, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco in 1910, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, H. C. Christensen, 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home, San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Olson & Mahony Steamship Company's 
latest carrier, the "Mary Olson," was launched 
recently at Eureka shipyards. Oliver J. Olson's 
daughter, Florence, christened the vessel. The 
"Mary Olson" has a capacity for carrying 1,000,- 
000 feet of lumber. 

A libel was filed in the United States Dis- 
trict Court at San Francisco against Swayne & 
Hoyt and others named as owners of the steam 
schooner "Casco," by John H. Tietjen, former 
chief officer of the vessel. Tietjen claims 
$298.85 as wages due him for a period he was 
under the treatment of a physician for a broken 
jaw, which he sustained on board the vessel in 
Humboldt bay last March. 

The old barkentine Fremont, for many 
years engaged in the codfishing trade, and for 
over a score of years a watermark about San 
Francisco bay, has been sold by the Union Fish 
Company to a moving picture company. The 
Fremont, after years of usefulness, is to partic- 
ipate in a series of thrillers for the movies, 
and her destruction will be accomplished when 
she will be beached and blown up in a scenario 
dealing with the adventures of a band of pi- 
rates. 

In practically all lines of shipping on the 
Columbia river September this year proved to 
be a better month than it did last year, and the 
total values of the exports for September were 
$328,821 greater than for the same period last 
year. There were nineteen vessels that took 
cargoes offshore during the month, the aggre- 
gate value being $1,807,245. With the exception 
of a very slight decrease in the flour shipments, 
all commodities moved were greater than the 
year preceding. 

Announcement was made at the Navy De- 
partment that Lieutenant-Commander Clark S. 
Woodward, U. S. N., will be detailed as naval 
aid to President Moore of the Panama-Pacific 
International Exposition. It was reported at 
the Navy Department that Lieutenant-Com- 
mander Woodward's first duty in connection 
with the Exposition will be probably performed 
during the Mediterranean cruise of the Atlantic 
fleet, when he will interest Ministers of Marine 
of European Governments in a plan to have 
war ships attend the Exposition. 

The electric naval collier "Jupiter" has re- 
turned to the Mare Island Navy Yard from 
a forty-eight-hour sea trip to shake down her 
propelling machinery. It is said that the elec- 
tric devices worked perfectly, but some trouble 
was experienced with foaming boilers and in 
the keeping up of the steam pressure at the 
turbine engine. However, the electric drives 
speeded the propeller up to 108 revolutions per 
minute, only two short of the number estimated 
as necessary to attain the fourteen knots for 
which she was designed. After some slight 
changes another trial will be held. 

New rates on flour and wheat to the Orient, 
to become effective November 1, have been 
agreed upon by the various transpacific steam- 
ship lines doing business on this Coast. The 
rates decided on are: To Yokohama, $4 instead 
of $3.50: to Hongkong, $5 instead of $4; to 
Manila, $5.50 instead of $5, and to Shanghai, 
$5.50 instead of $5. For the next few months 
shipments of flour and wheat to the Orient are 
expected to be heavy, most of the regular ves- 
sels on the transpacific routes having all the 
accommodations engaged for weeks ahead of 
the present date. 

The North German Lloyd will inaugurate a 
passenger and freight service through the Pana- 
ma Canal as soon as the canal is opened, ac- 
cording to the decision reached by the full board 
of directors at a meeting held in Bremen Sep- 
tember 5. In addition, the board decided upon a 
building program for the next year. This pro- 
vides for the construction of four cargo steam- 
ers of 12,000 tons each and a sister ship to 
the "Columbus," of 37,000 tons, now building, 
which will be ready for the New York-London- 
Paris-Bremen service in September of next year. 
It was also decided to build a sister ship to the 
"Berlin," 17,500 tons. 

The French Academy of Sciences is construct- 
ing a large observatory for celestial and aerial 
observations at Papeete, Tahiti. After the open- 
ing of the Panama Canal, Papeete will become 
an important port, and the observatory will sup- 
ply much necessary data to the ships engaged 
in the Australian and Canal trade. The equip- 
ment for the Papeete observatory will be forty, 
thirty-eight and thirty centimeter telescopes, be- 
sides smaller ones, and a time observatory. The 
time oijservatory was recommended by the In- 
ternational Congress of Time at Paris a year 
ago. The location will be: Lat. 70 deg. S. and 
Long. 153 deg. W. of Greenwich. 

The Alberta Pacific Elevator Company has 
purchased a grain elevator in Vancouver, to be 
the first portion of the Pacific terminals of the 
company for handling grain from Alberta. For 
nearly a year the company has been studying 
the feasibility of Western shipments of grain via 
the Panama Canal, and has decided to go ahead. 
The company owns 150 elevators in Alberta and 
Saskatchewan and has extensive terminal ele- 
vator capacity at Calgary. The latter will be 



extended as soon as possible. Until such time 
as the Panama Canal is completed, grain ship- 
ments will be sent to China and Japan. Ship- 
ment will begin this fall. 

The officers of the steamer "Spokane," which 
met with an accident, stopped and discharged 
her passengers six miles south of Cape Mudge 
last week, were entirely exonerated of the charges 
of lack of discipline in disembarking the passen- 
gers by John K. Bulger of San F^rancisco, super- 
vising inspector of steamboats, at the conclusion 
of the investigation in Seattle. "From my in- 
vestigation," says Inspector Bulger, in his de- 
cision, "I find that there are mitigating circum- 
stances connected with the case which deserve 
consideration and cause me to commend instead 
of condemn the action of John Burns, chief mate 
of the vessel, on the night of October 4th." 

Small craft, particularly of schooner rig and 
ctjuipped with auxiliary power, are said to be 
in demand on the lower coast. A number of 
vessels of this type, recently placed in the trade, 
have been doing well. Negotiations have been 
under way for the purchase of some of the fine 
old schooners formerly operated out of Victoria 
in the sealing trade. W. A. Loaiza & Co., who 
recently purchased the schooner "Markland" for 
about $5000, are said to have taken the schooner 
"Dora Siewerd." They are also reported to be 
seeking further small craft for the west coast 
traffic between ports. The "Markland" was con- 
verted into an auxiliary craft before she left 
here and was renamed the "Balboa." 

W. G. Sickel, vice-president of the Hamburg- 
American Steamship Company, spent several 
days in San Francisco investigating conditions 
with reference to an exhibit at the Panama- 
Pacific Exposition in 1915. Sickel's visit here 
is in conformity with instructions recently sent 
him by Herr Ballin, chairman of the board of 
directors of the Hamburg-American line, from 
the Hamburg office, to the effect that the com- 
pany desired comprehensive information with 
reference to its plans for participation. The 
company is the prime mover in a private or- 
ganization recently formed at Berlin to bring 
about participation by German industries. It 
has been announced that, notwithstanding the 
German Government's declination of the invita- 
tion from the American Government, the com- 
pany will make a large private exhibit. 

Official statistics, just received by Collector 
John O. Davis, of exports of domestic mineral 
oils for the month of August are as follows 
from tiie customs districts of the Pacific Coast: 
From San Francisco, 23,912,691 gallons, value 
$611,059; from Southern California, 49,334 gal- 
lons, value $1,814; from Washington, 5,428,210 
gallons, value $223,856. Inasmuch as practically 
no mineral oil is produced in Oregon or Wash- 
ington, the exports from the latter arc necessar- 
ily oil produced in California, and, judging from 
the higher valuation placed on the proportionate 
quantity exported from there, it is apparent that 
the value stated for exports from Washington 
includes the transportation charges from the 
various loading ports in California. The per- 
centage of distribution of crude petroleum 
among the several products was estimated 
under the census of 1905 as'follows: Burning 
oils, 61 per cent; residium, 5.7 per cent; paraffin 
oils, 2.9 per cent; parafiln wax, 1.4 per cent; 
reduced oils, 1.1 per cent; naphtha and gasoline, 
10.3 per cent; neutral filtered oils, 0.9 per cent; 
the balance being various other products. If a 
census of such products has since been taken 
its compilation has not yet been published. 

Joy and sorrow intermingled in the arrival at 
San Francisco aboard the Oceanic liner "Ven- 
tura" of the ship's company of the barkentine 
"Amaranth," which was lost on Jervis Island, in 
the South Pacific, a few weeks ago. Captain C. 
W. Nielson, his wife and their baby boy 
(George) and the dozen men composing the 
crew of the wrecked "Amaranth," will rejoin 
their relatives, but out in a little home in the 
Mission a woman is sobbing for one whose final 
knell was sounded with the safe arrival of those 
on the "Ventura." Until it became definitely 
known that the shipwrecked mariners being 
brought home by the "Ventura" were the crew 
of the "Amaranth," Mrs. Charles Johnson, wife 
of Captain Johnson of the missing schooner 
"Americana," had hoped that they might include 
her husl)and and his valiant crew, who sailed 
from the coast a few months ago and from 
whom no message has come out of the sea. 
Although the "Americana" was posted as missing 
at Lloyd's, an action which has never failed to 
mark a vessel's doom, Mrs. Johnson had hoped 
against hope until yesterday. Conflicting reports 
from Samoa had indicated that the "Americana," 
as well as the "Amaranth," might have been 
wrecked and that both crews had escaped, but 
the "Ventura" brought no news of the former 
vessel. 



F. 'R. WALL, who was for many years an offi- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floo", California St., 
near Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; 

(Advt) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Afflllated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Branches: 
NEW YORK CITY, 40 South St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 10.54 Magazine St. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St. 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON. Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



Telephone 1879 
Telephone 5153 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. T.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, C, 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONA WANDA, N. T., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, C, 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 Woodbrldge St., East 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1721 N. Third St. 
BAT CITT, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. T., 70 Isabella SL 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 
PORT HURON. Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT. Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed SL 
SUPERIOR. Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG. N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich.. 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO. N. Y.. 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O.. 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. 151 Reed St. 
CHICAGO. 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O.. 74 Bridge St. 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 East Woodbrldge St 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 
CONNEAUT. O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N, Y., 70 Isabella St. 
N. TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO. 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 84 Embarcadero. 

Branches: 
VICTORIA, B. C. Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER. B. C. Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 
and Dunsmuir, P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

lACOMA. Wash.. 2218 North 80th St. 

SEATTLE. Wash.. 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 66. 

ABERDEEN. Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore.. 51 Union Ave., Box 2100. 

EUREKA, Cal.. 227 First St.. P. O. Box 64. 

SAN PEDRO. Cal.. P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU. H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN. OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 91 Steuart St. 
Branches: 

SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V4 Western Ave.. P. O. Box 
875 

PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal.. 123 Fifth St.. P. O. Box 674. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAI'L SCIIARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. 1 10I>T Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six montiis - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
84 Embarcadero, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the .JOURNAI^, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, lesiblo, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. 'I'he JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1913. 



FOOLING THE PASSENGERS! 



When on .Vpril next the season of navigation 
opens for tlie year 1914, passengers on foreign- 
going, coasting and international vessels regis- 
tered in Canada will travel with the knowledge 
and sense of security that their lives are pro- 
tected by the strictest life-saving rules ever en- 
forced in the history of Canadian navigation. 

The hoard of steatnship inspection has just 
conchided drafting life-saving apiiliances for all 
Canadian vessels, which contain radical changes 
from the old order of things, and which, if ap- 
proved by the Government and strictly enforced, 
will make sea travel almost as safe as an intel- 
ligent supervision by the Government can make 
it. — Press Item. 

As will be seen by tlie foregoing, tlie Ca- 
nadian steamship inspection officials have 
evolved sonic new rules and regulations for 
greater safety of life at sea. And as a re- 
sult, every publication of any note has 
promptly informed its readers that loss of 
life at sea on Canadian vessels will hereafter 
be practically prevented. 

For instance, the Daily News Advertiser 
of Vancouver prints a column of eulogy upon 
the new regulations which deal with every- 
thing under the sun except the most impor- 
tant detail of safety — the manning of ships. 

It would seem self-evident that after every- 
thing else relating to life-saving, etc., has 
been disposed of, there remains the matter 
of determining how many men arc needed to 
handle the vessel and to utilize her equip- 
ment. But the influence of .shipping "inter- 
ests" has been able to invert the order in 
which the questions of equipment and man- 
ning should be considered. In most delibera- 
tions upon the subject that question is not 
considered at all. The prevailing idea being 
that so long as everything else is attended to 
— double hulls, lifeboats, etc. — the manning 
c|uestions may very well be left to take care 
of themselves. 

The utter folly of this process of reason- 
ing was again demonstrated in the latest 
disaster of the seas — the burning of tiie 
steamer "\'olturno" with a reported loss of 
approximately 136 lives. It appears that in 
this instance there were life-boats and life- 
belts galore, but the reports so far available 
indicate that the human element in the life- 
saving facilities on the "\^olturno" had been 



entirely neglected. We will not at this time 
dwell upon the lessons to be learned from 
this disaster, but if another object lesson were 
really needed to show our law-making bodies 
that the utmost skill and care in construction 
and equipment can not supersede the human 
clement in any really effective plan for safe- 
guarding life at .sea. the "Volturno" disaster 
surely must oi)en the eyes of all. Life-saving 
appliances may be perfect in themselves, but 
unless they be manned by competent men 
they are likely to prove worthless in an 
emergency. 

Too much reliance is placed in the mechan- 
ical, and not enough in the human factor of 
safety. And the case of the "Volturno" 
proves that the manning question remains, as 
it always has been, the most important factor 
in any plan for insuring the safety of lite 
and proi)erty at sea. 



STATUS OF THE SEAMEN'S BILL. 



On October 2 the Senate Committee on 
Commerce reported favorably upon the 
Nelson bill, known as Senate bill No. 136. 
The Nelson bill is an exact copy of the 
bill which passed the House and the Sen- 
ate last spring, but was vetoed by ex-Pres- 
ident Taft. 

Senator Fletcher, to whom the duty of re- 
porting the bill was assigned, declared that 
he would not be bound by the bill as reported 
and the other members of the committee 
were also left free to offer or support amend- 
ments. Comrade Furuseth writes that the 
best friends of the Seamen agreed to this 
because they mean to substitute the La Fol- 
lette bill (S. B. No. 4) or to so amend the 
Nelson bill as to make it practically similar 
to Senator La Follctte's mea.surc. It should 
be noted that Senate bill No. 4 is the one 
which received the endorsement of the De- 
partment of Commerce and the Department 
of Labor. 

There can be no doubt that those who have 
always opposed legislation of this kind con- 
sented to the reporting of the bill in the hope 
that the Senate will strike out the three- 
watch system for wheelsmen and watchmen 
and the proviso that none but alile seamen 
or men of equal rating shall be permitted at 
the wheel or lookout. To what extent the 
reactionaries will succeed remains to be seen ; 
it is certain, however, that there is going to 
be no further delay, as the Senate has unani- 
mously agreed to begin consideration of the 
Seamen's bill on Thursday, October 16 and 
to take final action on October 23. 

In the meantime President Wilson has ap- 
pointed the American delegates to the Inter- 
national Conference of Safety at Sea. Among 
the delegates are several naval officers, ship- 
builders, an expert in wireless telegraphy, the 
Commissioner of Navigation, the Supervising 
Inspector-General of the Steamboat Inspection 
Service, Senators Fletcher and Burton, Con- 
gressman Alexander, and. finally, Andrew 
Furuseth, President of the International Sea- 
men's Union of America. The conference 
is scheduled to meet in London on Novem- 
ber 12. and although Comrade Furuseth ap- 
])ears to be in a hopeless minority among 
the American delegates, his refusal to serve 
would be construed to mean that he dared 
not submit the Seamen's propositions to the 
judgment of "practical" men. Of course, 
much will de])cnd upon the action of the Sen- 
ate on the ))ending bill. The attitude of the 
entire .\inerican delegation will in a measure 



be guided by the action of the Senate, but 
no matter what is done by that body, the 
Seamen of America will never cease fighting 
for justice. There will be no backing and fill- 
ing ujwn this vital issue, and Comrade Furu- 
seth can not aflford to let pass this opportu- 
nity to present to the world the fundamentals 
upon Safety of Life at Sea. 



LM-MIGRATION CONFERENCE. 



A call has been issued to all Pacific Coast 
labor organizations for delegates to a two- 
days' convention of the Western Labor Immi- 
gration Conference, to be held in the Labor 
Temple, Seattle, Wash., at 10 a. m., Novem- 
ber 7 and 8, 1913. 

The Conference November 7 is called pri- 
marily for the purpose of devising plans 
whereby the problems to be presented to 
Pacific Coast labor by the influx of immi- 
gration consequent upon the opening of the 
Panama Canal may be solved. It is a cer- 
tainty that in the effort to solve this problem 
the counsel of all workers already on the 
Pacific Slope is needed, particularly ia view 
of the fact that the whole matter is to be 
submitted later to the American Federation 
of Labor Convention for aid and nation-wide 
a.ssi.stance. 

Some of the reasons why organized labor 
on the Pacific Coast should wake up imme- 
diately, are presented together with the Con- 
vention call by Secretary Charles Perry Tay- 
lor, Secretary of the Conference, as follows: 

Do you know the Panama Canal will be open 
to traflic in 1915? 

Do you know the coming Southeastern F.uro- 
pean immigration expected on the Pacific Coast 
after the Canal opens is 5,000,000 in the first five 
years? 

Do you know one steamship company alone 
has sold 125,000 steerage tickets from Europe 
via Panama Canal to Portland and Seattle, and 
no one knows how many to California 

Do you know this influx of immigration will 
glut the labor market of the Coast States, dis- 
organize the workers, drive those here farther 
inland, and generally demoralize labor conditions 
as established by Union Labor? 

Do you know that land sharks, steamship com- 
panies and commercial interests are spreading 
advertising all over Europe that the Pacific 
Coast is a land flowing with milk and honey, 
with gold nuggets lying in the creeks visible to 
the naked eye, and labor so scarce that em- 
ployers are begging for men to go to work? 

Do you know that commercial, educational 
and some semi-religious interests have been con- 
ducting a series of pro-immigration conventions 
on this Coast for three years, boosting European 
immigration? 

Do you know that not only are Washington, 
Oregon and California endangered from Labor's 
standpoint, but also the Rocky ^fountain States, 
for when the labor of the Coast is crowded out 
of work by the immigrant, he in turn will go 
inland to crowd others out of work? 

Do you know that the Union Labor of the 
Rocky Mountain and Pacific Coast States must 
either WAKE UP to this situation, and try to 
meet it. or else uselessly cry about it when it 
is too late? 

Do you know the American Federation of 
Labor, which has 2,200,000 members and will meet 
in annual convention in Seattle on November 10, 
affords a splendid opportunitj' to enable Amer- 
ican Union Labor to plan to solve this question? 

Do you know that the Western Labor Immi- 
gration Conference, composed of State Federa- 
tions of Labor, Trades Councils and local 
unions, will hold a convention in Labor Temple, 
Seattle, Wash., November 7 and 8, 1913, to con- 
sider the situation? 

Do you know that your union labor organiza- 
tion, whether a Western State or city central 
body, or a local union, may send as many dele- 
gates as desired to this Tminigration Conven- 
tion? 

Do you know that State Federations are pay- 
ing $10.00, citj' trades councils $5.00 and local 
unions $2.00 each to make this convention a 
■success, remitting payments to the secretary, 
whose address is below? 

Do you know that all such delegates will have 
opportunity to visit the convention of the .-Vmer- 
ican Federation of Labor in Seattle, which will 
be an education in itself, available on this Coast 
only once in many years? 

Do you know that the president of the West- 
ern Immigration Conference is Mr. E. J. Stack, 
secretary of the Oregon State Federation of 
Labor; and its secretary is Mr. Charles Perry 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Taylor, secretary of the Washington State Fed- 
eration of Labor — and that these officers serve 
without pay, desiring only to arouse the Union 
Labor of the West to the dangers that lie be- 
fore us? 

Do you know that this is your affair, and that 
you ought to WAKE UP? 



FEDERATION SUPPORTS SEAMEN. 



The Fourteenth Annual Convention of the 
California State Federation of Labor, which 
met at Fresno during the past week, unani- 
mously adopted the following self-explana- 
tory resolution : 

Whereas, There is pending in the Congress of 
the United States a bill drafted with a design 
to equalize the operating expenses of foreign 
vessels and American vessels, and thus tend to 
build up the American Merchant Marine and at 
the same time encourage y\rnericans to follow 
the sea for a livelihood; and 

Whereas, The safety provisions of said bill 
will insure greater safety of life and property at 
sea, and other features of the bill will abolish 
the last provisions in our statutory law for com- 
pulsory labor within the jurisdiction of the 
United States; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Fourteenth Annual Conven- 
tion of the California State Federation of Labor, 
that we re-indorse the .Seamen's bill, known as 
Senate bill No. 4, and urge upon Congress, and 
particularly upon the Senators and Representa- 
tives from California, to do their utmost for its 
immediate enactment. 



THE "ROANOKE" SALVAGE. 



Editor Coast Seamen's Journal: 

I am sure your readers will be interested in 
the first opinion regarding questions of mari- 
time law handed down by Judge M. T. Doo- 
ling, who was recently appointed by Presi- 
dent Wilson as a Judge for the United States 
District Court for the Northern District of 
California. The case is one brought by cer- 
tain of the crew of the ".Santa Clara" against 
the "Roanoke" (both vessels being owned by 
the same owner) for salvage, and was de- 
cided October 7, F)13. Of course it is pos- 
sible the case may be appealed, so that it 
may be some time before the decision be- 
comes final and the money is paid ; but there 
does not seem to be any reason to believe 
that there can be any reversal. Mr. Doe's 
company was represented by Attorneys C. H. 
Sooy and D. L. Levy. I appeared for the 
libelants. The opinion is substantially as 
follows : 

"On April 10, 1913, the steamer 'Roanoke,' 
bound from San Pedro to San Francisco, 
with 93 passengers and a cargo of freight, 
lost her propeller when in the neighborhood 
of Point Arguello. She drifted inshore from 
10:05 a. m. until 11:10 a. m., when the an- 
chor was dropi^cd in 14j/2 fathoms of water 
at a point in the neighborhood of 1>^ miles 
south by east of Point Arguello. There was 
no wind and the sea was calm with a light 
swell from the west. During the time that 
she remained so anchored, that is, until about 
5 :20 p. m., she was enveloped in a dense fog, 
and not more than half a mile to the eastward 
of the regular course of vessels plying along 
the Coast. No rough weather was encoun- 
tered during this period, the sea remaining 
calm and there being no wind. The anchor 
held without any apparent strain. The coast 
in that neighborhood is rocky in some places 
and sandy in other. The steamer 'Santa 
Clara,' en route from San Francisco to Port 
Harford, about 10:45 a. m., receive'd the 
following message from the 'Roanoke' : 

" 'Capt. Jessen, S. S. Santa Clara: Come to 
our assistance. Lost wheel 2 miles south Point 
.■\rguello. Dickerson.' 

"To which he replied at 10:55 a. m. : 

" 'Capt. Dickerson, S. S. Roanoke. Your mes- 
sage received. Coming to your assistance. Jes- 
sen.' 

"At 12:07 p. m. the master of the 'Roanoke' 



sent to the 'Santa Clara' the following mes- 
sage : 

"'Capt. Jessen, S. S. Santa Clara: We need 
your assistance at once. Dickerson.' 

"Upon receipt of the first message, the 
'Santa Clara' altered her course and .steamed 
directly for the 'Roanoke,' arriving there 
about 4:45 p. m., and took her in tow for 
San Luis, where they, arrived about 4 a. m., 
and where the 'Roanoke' anchored about 
6 :45 a. m. outside the breakwater. She re- 
mained there until 11 a. m., when the tug 
'Sea Rover,' dispatched from San Franci.sco 
for that purpose, took her in tow and finally 
landed her at her dock at the latter place. 
The 'Santa Clara' dropped her at San Luis 
in obedience to the orders of the president of 
the claimant, the North Pacific Steamship 
Co., the owner of both steamers, but was al- 
wa}'s near enough to assist tmtil the tug ar- 
rived. The present libel is by certain of the 
crew of the '.Santa Clara' for salvage. 

"It is evident that while the sea remained 
calm and the anchor held, the 'Roanoke' 
would not be in any immediate danger. But 
on this coast in the month of April, it is im- 
possible to say how long such condition would 
contiiuie. A vessel so disabled as to be with- 
out motive power, within 1 Yi miles of a rocky 
coast, may be, if not relieved, in reasonably 
apprehended danger. The telegrams of the 
ma.ster of the 'Roanoke' would indicate that 
he believed that he was in need of assistance, 
and the circum.stances were such as to render 
that belief very reasonable. The fact that the 
danger was not immediately imminent is not 
at all controlling. It is contended that this 
was a towage instead of a salvage service ; 
but to tliis contention I am unable to agree. 

" ',\ salvage service is a service voluntarily 
rendered to a vessel needing assistance, and is 
designed to relieve her from some distress or 
danger either present or reasonably apprehended. 
.\ towage service is one which is rendered for 
the mere jinrpose of expediting her voyage, 
without reference to any circumstances of dan- 
ger.' McConnichie v. Kerr. 9 Fed., 50. 

"The services here rendered were salvage 
services. Poth steamers belonging to the 
same owners, there is no claim made on be- 
half of the steamer 'Santa Clara.' The value 
of tlio 'Roanoke' is $150,000; she was re- 
lieved without any difficulty by the '.Santa 
Clara.' wdth her own lines- brought aboard 
the '.Santa Clara' by her crew. No hardships 
or special dangers were encountered by the 
'Santa Clara's' crew, and under all the cir- 
cumstances I thiidv one-half of a month's pay 
to each of the crew will be ample compensa- 
tion. This award is made for the reason that 
all salvage awards should be fairly substan- 
tial so that vessels and crews may be rather 
encouraged to render stich services than dis- 
couraged from so doing." 

The persons who will be entitled to re- 
cover, when the case is finally settled, are : 

.Second Officer, A. Sjogren ; Third Officer, 
J. E. Johnson ; First Asst. Engr., A. Disher ; 
Second Asst. Engr., Geo. M. Reed ; Third 
Asst. Engr., G. W. Jacobs ; Seamen, Geo. K. 
Bekker, M. Meislahn, P. Cain, F. G. Palmer, 
Christen ChrLstensen, A. Johnson, Oskar Jo- 
hansen, A. C. Andersen, E. Andersson, H. 
Andreasen ; First Cook, J. Pitts-; Second 
Cook, J. Martin; Third Cook, W. E. Pitts; 
Pantryman, E. Andrews ; Messboy, R. Ten- 
nant ; Purser, B. Frankel ; Wireless Operator, 
K. G. Clark; Firemen, V. Mat.son, A. Eraser; 
Wiper, M. Staley (Fahey) ; Oilers, W. Kre- 
mer, A. S. Caskey, S. B. Nilsen; Waiters, A. 
G. Clarke, J. Kotcliarin, C. Gibson, Hansen. 
Yours very truly, 

F. R. Walk. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 1.3, 1913. 

A synopsis of the minutes of the regular meet- 
ing will be published in next week's Journal, this 
meeting having been postponed on account of 
Columbus Day, a legal holiday in California. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

84 Embarcadero. Phone Kearny 2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 6, 1913. 
Shipping dull, with few men ashore. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 6, 1913. 
.Shipping quiet; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
N. E. corner of Hastings and Main streets. 
P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 6, 1913. 
No meeting: no quorum. Shipping dull. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 6, 1913. 
.Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



.Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 6, 1913. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 6, 1913. 
Shipping sl.'ick. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 6. 1913. 
No meeting; shipping slack. 

JOHN ANDERSEN, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 6, 1913. 
.Shipping fair. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/4 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. 6. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu .-\gency, Sept. 27. 1913. 
No meeting; no cpiorum. Shipiiing dull. 

JACK EDWARDSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 9, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slow. Nominations of dele- 
gates to the International Seamen's L'nion were 
proceeded with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle .Agency. October 2, 1913. 
.Shipping medium. Nominated officers for the 
ensuing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203-205. Phone 
Main 2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, October 2, 1913. 
.Shipping dull; plenty of cooks ashore. Nom- 
in;itO(I officers for the ensuing term. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 

Portland .Xgency, October 2, 1913. 
Shipping quiet; few men ashore; prospects 
poor. Nominated officers for the ensuing term. 
THOMAS BAKER. Agent. 
New Grand Central Hotel, Room 108, Third 
and Flanders Sts. Phnne \\\\\\\ 1528. 

DIED. 



Theodore Jansen, No. 2055, a native of Nor- 
way, age 40, died at Kinai, ;\laska, September 
6, 1913. 

Frederick Ochmeichen, No. 696, a native of 
Germany, age 31, drowned on Puget Sound, 
October, 1913. 

Carl Johan Erluiid. No. 562. a native of Fin- 
land, age 2!?-, drowned from a dredger in Mexico, 
September 16. 1913. 

Michael Rann, No. 991, a native of Russia, 
age }:7, died at New Buffalo, Mich., October 5, 
1913. 

Johan Larson, No. 615, a native of Sweden, 
aofe 44, drowned at San Rafael, Cal., October 10, 
1913. 

Jeremiah Gaudie, No. 1051. a native of Scot- 
land, age 22. drowned at Vancouver, B. C, Oc- 
tober 4, 1913. 

Peter Trallnes, No. 524, a native of Norway. 
.•\ge 33, died on board the fishing vessel .St;ir of 
Russia. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CHICAGO'S OUTER HARBOR. 



For many years the Chicago river, with 
its branches, constituted the harbor of 
Chicago; development of great industries 
to the south a quarter of a century ago 
brought the Cahimet river into prominence 
as an auxiliary. The tonnage handled 
through the Chicago river at present is 
about 4,000,000; that handled through the 
Calumet river is about 7,000,000. The lake 
shipping trade of the city has not kept 
pace with growth in other respects, this 
being due to several causes, mainly to 
railway competition, decline of the lumber 
trade and diversion of traffic to other lake 
points. It has long been maintained, how- 
ever, by those who have given thought to 
the subject that the decline in the lake 
commerce of Chicago could be traced di- 
rectly to the inadequacy of the old harbor. 
Difficulty in entering it at times, obstruc- 
tion caused by tunnel construction, delays 
incident to the opening of numerous 
bridges, and channel and wharves unequal 
to the needs of the newer type of lake ves- 
sels, are all charged with the falling away 
of business. 

For a generation Chicago has been striv- 
ing to obtain an outer harbor, that is, an 
artificial harbor on the lake front. River 
and railway interests have combined to 
postpone this improv-ement. The scheme 
has been defeated time and again, either at 
home or in Springfield. In 1911, however, 
the city council established four outer har- 
bor sites. The first of these embraced the 
lake shore from the mouth of the Chicago 
river north to Chicago avenue, and extend- 
ing one mile into the lake ; the second em- 
braced a stretch of shore line from the 
mouth of the Chicago river south to Ran- 
dolph street and extending one mile into 
the lake ; the third covered what may be 
termed the Grant park district; the fourth 
the Calumet district. A year later the 
harbor commission submitted to the city 
council a plan for the development of the 
scheme first mentioned and known as 'No. 
1." This scheme contemplates the con- 
struction eventually of five piers of 2500 
feet and one of 3000 feet in length. It is 
probable that only two of these will be 
undertaken at the start. The estimated 
cost of these is $4,400,000. At the election 
of April of last year the proposition to 
issue bonds to the amount of $5,000,000 for 
outer harbor improvement was approved 
by popular vote. A number of details 
have now been perfected. Legal difficul- 
ties have all been removed. Chicago is at 
length able to go about the actual con- 
struction of an outer harbor. 

The success of this enterprise will be 
far-reaching in its influence. It is con- 
fidently expected to give fresh impetus to 
lake traffic. There is hardly a question 
but that it will expedite the handling of 
both freight and passengers. It may lead 
in time to the closing of the Chicago river 
to shipping. This would result in the con- 
struction of permanent bridges, and this 
in turn would encourage an expansion of 
the business district and relieve the con- 
gestion which is now one of Chicago's 
greatest problems. — Christian Science Mon- 
itor. 



CONTRASTS ABOARD SHIP. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



Mr. James Montgomery. 

As he is standing, leaning against the 
railing of the steamer, Mr. James Mont- 
gomery, in his blue jacket, white flannel 
trousers and rich yachting cap, makes a 
pretty sight. lie is every bit of six feet 
tall, his eyes are bold and clear and his 
complexion ruddy. There can be no ques- 
tion in anybody's mind as to his being a 
good healthy animal. During the two 
weeks' ocean trip I got well acquainted 
with him. He interested me as a type. 
And I often spoke to him in order to draw 
him out. He is a lawyer by profession 
and a A\'all Street broker by occupation, 
lie is about 40 years old, married and 
father of two children. A great favorite 
with the ladies, and moderately unfaith- 
ful to his wife. Occupies a good social 
position and is a highly respected member 
of society. It is a pleasure to hear him 
talk; such mental vacuity I have seldom 
met. If he ever thought an original 
thought, it must have been only in his 
sleep. All his ideas are ready made. 

As he is descended from old American 
stock, he looks with contempt at all for- 
eigners. The Italians and the Germans 
in the steerage he regards as so many 
animals. Their position does not excite 
the slightest compassion in him, and if 
they had all gone under, it would have 
caused him no more concern than the 
drowning of so many rats. He is, of 
course, convinced that the United States 
is the only real country in the world- 
lie visits Europe with the same feeling 
that people have, for instance, when they 
pay a visit to Chinatown. And, of course, 
he is convinced of the immeasurable su- 
periority of the male over the female sex. 
\Voman suffrage was all rot. And if he 
had the power, he would make short work 
of all this nonsense. The double stand- 
ard of morality was all right. It was 
perfectly proper for a man to be unfaith- 
fvil to his wife, but if a wife was unfaithful 
to her husband, she was a prostitute, who 
should be shunned by all decent people. 

He is innocent of any knowledge of lit- 
erature, and the names prominent in phil- 
osophy, science or social work are quite 
unknown to him. Henry George was one 
of those damned anarchists who would 
take away your property from you in or- 
der to divide up. The names of Marx and 
Lassalle he had never come across. Ibsen 
— yes, he knew the name of Ibsen. He 
saw one of his plays. It was a stupid 
pla\% and all he remembered of it was 
that the actress who played in it — Nazi- 
mova — had a pretty neck and pretty shoul- 
ders. Ingersoll should have had his head 
knocked ofT, or he should have been put 
behind bars, for attacking God and reli- 
gion. He. himself, of course, had not 
much use for religion — but the people must 
have religion. Take away their fear of 
punishment and the whole world would go 
to pieces. 

As stated, he had no familiarity with lit- 
erature. No, he never reads books. Most 
of them are written by fools who haven't 
a decent suit of clothes to wear, and who 
understand nothing about practical life. 
He knows that Mark Twain was a humor- 
ist, but he has not read any of his books. 
Yes, he thinks he read "Innocents Abroad." 



Of our William Dean Howells he has 
never heard. Oh, yes, he has heard of 
Gorki, "that fellow who came over with 
another man's wife and was kicked out of 
all the hotels." The name of Tolstoy was 
altogether unknown to him. Perhaps if 
the great Russian has attempted to come 
here and been debarred on account of some 
of his anarchistic theories, he would have 
heard of him. For his reading is limited 
to the newspapers exclusively, and even in 
them he reads principally the stock reports 
and the baseball news. 

In politics our friend Montgomery is a 
stanch Republican, and he believes in high 
tariff. But this does not prevent him from 
boasting of how many things he and his 
wife smuggle in every year on their return 
from foreign lands. The tariff is a good 
thing in general — but for him personally to 
pay duty on things he buys abroad, why 
it would be absurd. 

Such is our friend, James Montgomery. 
A splendid animal, a thorough "gentle- 
man," but an utterly worthless parasite. 
A parasite who never thought an original 
thought, never felt a generous impulse, 
never produced a dollar's worth of value. 
And the Montgomerys constitute the bul- 
wark of our civilization. They think they 
do. 

Dr. Alfred Braun. 

Alfred Braun is not very pretty to look 
at. He is tall, gaunt, with sunken cheeks, 
and long arms with which he does not 
seem to know what to do. His large head 
is as hairless as an egg, he is very near- 
sighted and one of his legs is a little bit, 
just a tiny little bit shorter than the other. 
His collar is seldom of immaculate white- 
ness, and his tie is often awry. And his 
trousers are generally baggy and his shoes 
are seldom shined. None of the sweet 
young things and even very few of the old 
ladies on board pay any attention to him. 

He is a doctor by profession. And the 
amount of charity, of gratuitous work that 
he has been doing in the twenty-five years 
of his practice, only his numerous patients 
know. Little and frail as he is, he works 
from sixteen to twenty hours every day of 
the year. But his practice occupies only 
about half of his time. He reads all the 
important medical literature and he is 
fully up to date as to the latest develop- 
ments in medicine. But besides medicine 
he has two hobbies. His hobbies are lit- 
erature and philosophy. He is familiar 
with every literature in the world. English, 
French, German and Italian he reads in 
the original, while everything worth while 
in Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian 
and Spanish he reads in translation. And 
every new philosophic, social and religious 
movement is of more interest to him than 
is the amount of his income. He writes 
a good deal and his writings have had a 
marked influence on the thought of his 
time. His life is leaving an indelible 
impression on his contemporaries. His 
books and magazine articles are looked for 
eagerly by all earnest students of philo- 
sophical and psychological problems. He 
lives with extreme moderation and a large 
share of his income he devotes to humani- 
tarian causes. All his life is an offering 
to humanity. His truthfulness, loyalty and 
reliability are proverbial. But nobody, that 
is nobody of the common rabble, would 
call him a gentleman. It was delicious to 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



note the contempt on James Montgomery's 
face whenever he happened to pass Dr. 
Braun. He seemed to think that it was an 
impertinence on the latter's part to exist 
at all, or at least to be on the same boat 
with him. 

Yes, James Montgomery, a pernicious, 
pestiferous parasite, taking everything 
from society and giving it nothing in re- 
turn, is a gentleman. Dr. Alfred Braun, 
one of humanity's noblest types, who gives 
his all to society, taking practically nothing 
in return, is not a gentleman. 

Is this the irony of fate, or is something 
wrong with language? — William J. Robin- 
son, M. D., in Critic and Guide. 



HUNGARIAN FARM WORKERS. 



No worker in Europe is so devoid of all 
common rights as the Hungarian agricul- 
tural laborer. Only with the assistance of 
the police can he be prevailed upon to re- 
main true to the "Fatherland." 

In spite of the exceptional laws and po- 
lice regulations directed against the emi- 
gration of the workers every worker en- 
deavors to leave his unhospitable homeland 
at the first opportunity which presents it- 
self. The unheard-of injustices under 
which the agricultural laborers of this 
country have to suffer are depicted in the 
yearly report of the Minister of Agricul- 
ture, which lately gave notice that in the 
case of an agricultural laborer, engaged un- 
der contract, refusing to work for any rea- 
son whatever, the judge has to take legal 
action against same, causing him to be 
"escorted" back to work or sentenced for 
"transgression of the law." 

Should the authorities concerned with 
the negotiations between the laborers and 
great landlords not be successful in their 
attempts to "persuade" the laborers to 
work, then the said authorities must take 
such steps as will insure the necessary sup- 
ply of laborers being held in "reserve," at 
the disposal of the landlords. 

In such cases it is only necessary for the 
landlord to briefly state how many "pairs" 
he will require and where the workers are 
to be sent. The landlords have to pay the 
same number of day's wages for these 
strikebreakers, who are recruited and sup- 
ported by the government, as the latter 
has to pay the strikebreakers. Besides this 
the landlords have to provide board and 
lodging for the blacklegs. 

This draconic provision fills the prisons 
every year, but it also "insures" a peace- 
ful harvest. The necessary work is ac- 
complished. The Hungarian agricultural 
laborer is forced to work in the manner 
of the slaves in the lead mines of Siberia — 
at the point of the bayonet. It is not sur- 
prising that under the circumstances these 
workers prefer the conditions of other coun- 
tries, no matter how bad ; but an influx of 
these workers into any country might en- 
danger the position of the inhabitants. 

Not only is it in the interest of the labor 
movement to organize this outflow of emi- 
grants, we must, further, give the Hun- 
garian unions and labor party every sup- 
port in their fight for the betterment of 
their conditions. 



The trade union is a standing challenge 
to that miserable old cynicism, "Every 
man for himself, and the devil take the 
hindmost." 



SINGLE TAX PROBLEMS. 



A seeker for information asks how land 
values would be determined under the 
single tax. At the same time he says that 
some land is more productive than others, 
is closer to market, or may have some- 
thing upon it to increase its value. 

All such circumstances are taken into 
consideration by assessors now, or ought 
to be. The valuation of land is a matter 
that has been reduced to a science. Such 
methods of valuation as the Somers Sys- 
tem are safe methods that could be em- 
ployed under the single tax, just as they 
are being employed in Houston, Texas, 
Cleveland, Ohio, and a number of other 
cities. 

Another question is "how would corpo- 
rations be handled as regards their taxes?" 
The same as individuals. This is not gen- 
erally done now. In many States cor- 
porations are under special tax laws, gen- 
erally so drawn as to give an unfair ad- 
vantage to the larger ones. All such dis- 
tinctions would be abolished. This is 
something that should be done even 
should the single tax not be adopted. 

"How would the single tax apply to 
railroads?" The single tax would largely 
increase the taxes now paid by railroads. 
On railroad franchises alone, the tax 
would be far in excess of existing taxes. 
In 1912 the railroads paid altogether taxes 
amounting to something less than $114,- 
000,000 on property which they value at 
approximately $22,.5O0,000,000, or a rate 
of about one-half of one per cent. The 
cost of the roads and equipment, accord- 
ing to the railroads themselves, was $15,- 
872,000,000. These figures may be scaled 
down when the physical valuation begun 
by the federal government will be com- 
pleted. But taking them as given, there 
would seem to be a franchise value of 
about $7,000,000,000, which, taxed at 3 
per cent, would produce more than double 
the present tax paid by railroads on all 
property. Besides that, there is much 
land value included in the fifteen billions 
allowed for physical value, which would 
still further increase the tax. However, 
there are good reasons why the franchises 
should be revoked entirely and no private 
corporation be allowed control of a pub- 
lic highway. 

Another question is, would the revenue 
raised be sufficient for the government? 
Land values of the United State have 
been estimated by different experts at 
from sixty to one hundred billion dollars. 
Taking the lowest figure a tax of 3 per 
cent would raise far more revenue than 
State and Federal governments raise now. 



The steamship Kristianiafjord, of the 
new Norwegian-American line, arrived at 
New York on June 17 from Christiania, 
marking a new era in the maritime history 
of Norway. Although Norway's merchant 
marine is rated as the fourth largest in 
the world, there has not been hereto- 
fore any direct steamship connection with 
New York. A delegation of Norwegian- 
Americans met the liner down the bay and 
a reception, in celebration of her arrival, 
was held. The ship is 530 feet long and 
brouglit 150 cabin and 350 steerage pass- 
engers. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. T 56 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. T 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAT CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. T 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142- Mackinaw Avenu* 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 B. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 

TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. V. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave, Ba«t 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. T 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenu* 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 66 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295 

BRAJ<rCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 64 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 617 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 162 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA...". 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH PVICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault St. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DECLINE OF FRENCH COLONY. 



United States Consul John K. Baxter 
reports upon the commercial decline of 
the Islands of St. Pierre and Miquelpn, 
which began in 1889 and has proceeded 
with increasing rapidity since 1902, and 
was not checked during 1912. Signs of 
distress are visible on all sides. In the 
town of St. Pierre there arc tenantless 
houses in every street which have been so 
long neglected that they are no longer 
habitable; private piers and wharves built 
at great expense have fallen into decay ; 
warehouses are empty and deserted ; and 
the artificial stone beaches on which fish 
was dried in former years are overgrown 
with weeds. 

The last census was taken in March, 
1911. At that time there were 3,403 in- 
habitants on the Island of St. Pierre, 363 
on Dog Island, and 443 on Great and Lit- 
tle Miquelon. It is probable that there has 
been some decrease through emigration 
during the two years that have since 
elapsed. 

From the beginning of June until the 
end of September the French and foreign 
fishermen temporarily in port frequently 
outnumber the permanent inhabitants. V,c- 
fore and after the fishing season, and even 
in midwinter, many foreign vessels call for 
shelter, supplies, or for overhauling on the 
marine railways. The harbor is rarely ice- 
bound. 

The colonial budget for 1913 provides 
for an expenditure for all purposes of $97,- 
650. 

The imports during the calendar year 
1912 were valued at $999,628. This total, 
however, includes an item of $135,100, be- 
ing the declared value of a British steam- 
ship registered under the French flag in 
the name of the local agent of the British 
owners, but without any real transfer of 
the property. The arrangement was only 
temporary, and it has since been canceled. 
If this item is deducted, the imports aggre- 
gate $864,528, as compared with $1,019,- 
927 in 1911. The exports were valued at 
$1,158,575, as against $1,639..591 in 1911. 

Two American, 16 British, and 114 
French steam vessels, and 18 American, 
989 British, and 368 French sailing vessels 
entered the port of St. Pierre during 1912. 
The aggregate tonnage of these vessels 
was 176,988, compared with 179,028 tons 
in 1911. Among the vessels calling in 1912 
were the French cruiser "Descartes,"' com- 
missioned to patrol the fishing grounds, and 
the hospital ship "Saint Francois D'Assise," 
which cruises on the Banks during the 
fi.shing season, cares for the sick and in- 
jured, and acts as a floating postoffice for 
the French fleet. 

One steam trawler and three schooners 
were wrecked on the coast during the year, 
and several schooners went ashore, but 
were pulled ofT by tugs before they had 
been seriously damaged. 

The fisheries, which are the mainstay 
of the colony, were not successful in 1912. 
Forty schooners were fitted out, of which 
5 were wrecked; the remaining 35, with 
one or two exceptions, showed a serious 
loss on the season's operations. The in- 
shore fisheries were worked by 757 men in 
dories, small sloops, and motor boats. The 
total catch of the schooners was 4,917,293 
pounds, and of the inshore fishermen 2,- 
928,187 pounds of green salted cod. The 



average catch per schooner was less than 
in any year since 1906, and the total catch 
of the colony was the smallest in several 
decades ; the local fleet dwindles from year 
to year, and is now reduced to one-fifth of 
its former size. 

As there are no regular means of com- 
munication between St. Pierre and the out- 
side world except as provided by one sub- 
sidized mail steamer, and the subsidy con- 
sumes approximately one-fifth of the reve- 
nues of the colony, the service is of prime 
importance. There have been some delays, 
due in part to the endeavors of the con- 
tractor, in the face of unfavorable weather 
conditions, to maintain a freight and pas- 
senger service between Nova Scotia and 
St. Johns and ports on the south coast of 
Newfoundland, as well as between Nova 
Scotia and St. Pierre. This has given oc- 
casion for complaint. Another objection 
urged against the new steamer is that it 
draws too much water to enter the innc 
harbor and approach the dock except at high 
tide. It has frequently been necessary to 
handle freight in lighters and to use small 
launches for landing and embarking pas- 
sengers. 

Among measures suggested to restore the 
prosperity of the colony and more or less 
seriously discussed during 1912 were: Fur- 
ther reduction of the administrative per- 
sonnel, which was cut down in May, 1906, 
but with the mail subsidy still absorbs a! 
most the entire revenue, leaving very littl-:^ 
suri)lus for public works; the establishment 
of a coal depot for the steam trawlers, 
which now coal at Sydney, Nova Scotia; 
the fitting out of one or more steamers 
for the spring seal killing in the Gulf of 
St. Lawrence and off the northeastern 
coast of Newfoundland, with a plant at 
St. Pierre for the reduction of blubber and 
treatment of hides; a concession for a 
casino ; legi.slation to require all French 
fishing vessels on the Newfoundland Banks 
to call at least once during the season at 
St. Pierre. This last measure is urged for 
the benefit of the fishermen, who now 
frequently spend seven months at sea, 
without replenishing their stock of fresh 
water and provisions. It is, of course, 
favored for business reasons by the merch- 
ants of the colony. 



THE SUPPLY OF EMERY. 



The world's supply of emery comes from 
Greek islands and from Asia Alinor near 
Smyrna. Importations into the United 
States, which average $250,000 annually, 
have been hampered within the past year 
becau.se of disturbed conditions in the Bal- 
kans and the withdrawal from industrial 
life of so many men for the armies. Some 
.American manufacturers have been incon- 
venienced l)y the delay in emery ship- 
ments. In this connection the following 
iMiropean press dispatch from .\thens will 
be of interest: 

"It is thought that the bill passed by 
the Greek Chamber regulating the emery 
trade of Xaxos, one of the Greek islands 
supplying a large proportion of the world's 
requirements of soft polishing emery, will 
result in the speedy settlement of the 
strike for higher wages of the workers 
engaged in obtaining the mineral. The 
minimum selling price of Naxos emery is 
fixed by the bill at 65 francs ($12.54) per 



metric ton (2,204.6 pounds), while first- 
grade emery must not be sold below 110 
francs ($21.23) per metric ton. The gra- 
ding of the mineral will be under the con- 
trol of three Government ofificials stationed 
on the island, while all sales have to be 
checked by a special agent stationed on 
the neighboring island of Syra, where the 
product has to be shipped after sorting. 
The agent will give a certificate with each 
lot sold, which will contain particulars re- 
garding the quantity, quality, selling price, 
and steamer by which reshipment will be 
made. Heavy penalties will be enforced in 
cases where false information on these 
points is given." 



LAND AND OPPORTUNITY. 



Joseph Knowles, a Boston artist, began 
on .August 5th, a two months' experiment 
in an extreme method of living a simple 
life. Naked and alone he entered a prime- 
val forest in Maine to test the possibility 
of a modern civilized man living under 
conditions similar to that of cave dwellers. 
He is succeeding. Messages he has sent 
written on the bark of trees with burnt 
sticks, show that he has provided him- 
self with food, shelter and clothing, and 
has made a fire through friction. He has 
done more than this, however, although 
he may not be aware of it. He has fur- 
nished a most unique and valuable object 
lesson in political economy. He has shown 
that a man may be ever so destitute, but 
given access to land, he can get a living 
of sorne kind through his own unaided ef- 
forts. He has furnished a concrete answer 
to the question : "What good will access 
to land do the man without a dollar?" 

But while Mr. Knowles was able to suc- 
cessfully conduct his experiment, it does 
not follow that it would be advisable for 
the disemployed workers of Maine to make 
a rush for this same wilderness to get a 
living therein. That wilderness is the 
property of certain individuals who have 
been willing enough to let Mr. Knowles 
conduct his experiment, but who will prob- 
ably object to turning to practical use the 
lesson the experiment has taught. If Mr. 
Knowles had gone into the wilderness not 
naked and alone, but with a number of 
associates supplied with machinery and 
other requisites for developing the re- 
sources in the most up-to-date way he 
would probably have been warned off as a 
trespasser. Paper title deeds not only to 
the Maine wilderness, but to unused lands 
throughout the country are keeping capital 
unused and labor unemployed. What is 
needed is a measure that will make it less 
profitable to the holders of these deeds to 
stand in the way of production. The most 
practical method would be through taxa- 
tion. By putting all taxes on land values, 
holders of unused lands would he made to 
see greater profit in getting out of the way 
of industry than in obstructing it. That 
will open up the wilderness, not only in 
the forests of Maine, but in the hearts of 
big cities, and will give to every man who 
wants work the opportunity he seeks. 



Don't knock the union unless you can 
show something better that will improve 
your immediate conditions. 



Deinand the union label upon all purchases ! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 

(Continued from Page 3.) 



some of the injuries were trivial. When 
the statement of William Lee was chal- 
lenged by counsel for the railroads, he cited 
statistics from the Interstate Commerce 
Commission's report. This report, on June 
30 last, gave 3,635 railroad employes killed 
in the United States during the year. ^Tr. 
Garretson argued that doubling the amount 
of tonnage to a train doubled the risk, as 
well as the responsibility, on the trainmen. 
Some of the economies introduced by the 
management also increased the risk of the 
men, and the economies were paid for out 
of the benefit fund of the unions. 



Will Ask Drastic Measure. 

Actuated by the numerous and disastrous 
railroad wrecks, the Interstate Commerce 
Commission is reported to be considering 
recommendations that are far-reaching, 
tending to safeguard the lives of passengers 
on the railroads of the country. It is un- 
derstood that the Commission will ask Con- 
gress for legislation giving it plenary power 
to guard the safety of the traveling public. 
The Commission's authority at present is 
limited to the making of recommendations 
to the railroads, which may be accepted or 
rejected as the railroads see fit. The wrecks 
on the New York, New TTaven and Hart- 
ford Railroad are chiefly responsible for 
the Commission's determination that fur- 
ther legislative authority is necessary. The 
Commission has completed and will make 
public shortly a report on the Wallingford 
wreck. It is stated that the Commission 
will handle this situation emphatically, and 
in the report will take the first step in the 
campaign for an extension of the Commis- 
sion's authority in the direction of securing 
legislation clothing the Commission with 
increased power. One im]iortant provision 
which is contemplated is that of prescrib- 
ing the speed of trains and compelling rail- 
roads to install safety devices. The power 
to regulate the speed of trains and also the 
power to penalize railroads for violation of 
speed limits will be a long step in the di- 
rection of preventing disastrous wrecks. In 
addition to the determination of the Com- 
mission it is stated that a conference will 
soon be called of officials in the construc- 
tion departments of the big railroads and 
the makers of steel rails for the purpose of 
determining steps to be taken to meet de- 
fects in rails. Since the general advent of 
heavier locomotives and cars, steel rails 
have shown a defect which is called trans- 
verse fissure and this defect heretofore has 
thwarted detection because it developed 
solely by high wheel pressure. Some proc- 
ess, however, will be sought for to guard 
against this exceedingly dangerous defect. 



Industrial Commission. 
When the personnel of the Industrial 
Commission, created by the Sixty-second 
Congress, was confirmed by the Senate re- 
cently, the appropriation made to carry on 
the work of the commission had expired 
by limitation. When the bill was passed 
by the Sixty-second Congress it carried an 
appropriation of $100,000 for the fiscal year 
ended June 30, 1913. The members of the 
commission, being confirmed after that date 
and no other appropriation having been 
made, the commission is entirely without 
funds. Prominent members of the com- 
mission, however, have been in Washing- 



ton and have taken up the matter of an 
appropriation, which is now before the Ap- 
propriation Committee of the House. It 
is confidently believed that funds will be 
provided, whereby the commission can com- 
mence its work in the near future. 



Oregon's Minimum Wage. 

After November 10 the minimum wage 
for women workers in Oregon will be $8.64 
for a maximum week of fifty-four hours. 
The Welfare Commission has made this or- 
der under the law passed by the last Legis- 
lature. The law under which the commis- 
sion was clothed with authority provides 
a penalty for violation of the commission's 
ruling by a fine of not less than $25 nor 
more than $100, or imprisonment in the 
county jail for not less than ten days nor 
more than three months, or by both fine 
and imprisonment. Any woman worker 
who is paid by her employers less than 
the minimum wage to which she is entitled 
may recover in a civil action the full 
amount of the minimum wage, less what 
she has already been paid, together with 
such attorney fees as may be allowed by the 
Court. Any agreement to work at less than 
the established minimum wage shall be no 
defense in a court action. The commis- 
sion's order establishing the minimum wage 
and conditions makes provision for a lunch 
period for women employes in manufactur- 
ing establishments in Portland of not less 
than forty-five minutes. 



CONDITION OF GERMAN SEAMEN. 
(Continued from Page 1.) 



owners liave not yet followed as it i.s rather ex- 
pensive. In Hamburg and Bremerhaven the 
sliipowncrs of the district finance and patronize 
''blacklc;-;" unions with resulting success, which 
must he attributed in the first place to the "ter- 
rorism" of the shipowners ancl their sharks. 

No clianges worthy of notice have been intro- 
duced into these systems since 1910. 

The German Seamen's Mission — which is also 
strongly represented in foreign ports — is also 
financed and indeed subsidized by the owners 
for which aid the. Mission shows its gratitude 
in many ways. Although their object should 
be to care for the "Christian'' and "floral" wel- 
fare of the seamen, in so far as the men have 
any desire for these attentions, they take the 
side of the owners in the economic fights and 
Iiy throwing dust into eyes of the sailors seek 
to educate them in modesty and submission. 
These endeavors of the Seamen's Mission na- 
turally meet with the liveliest approbation of 
the owners, but they are -not successful in 
reaching the majority of the sailors. 

The modern organization of the German sail- 
ors has been closely centralized since 1897 and 
affiliated with the organization of Harbor and 
Transport Workers' Union. During 1910 an 
average of 72,000 sailors were organized in our 
modern union, whilst of the deep sea fishermen 
only some 400 or 500, i. e., 2 per cent, or 3 
per cent., are members, and the river fishermen 
are outside our union and indeed outside the 
modern movement. 

There was no lack of social political action on 
behalf of the seamen between 1910 and 1912 
both in Parliament itself as well as outside. 
Noticeable results cannot be pointed out except- 
ing the incontestible educational results which 
our criticism produced on the Government, Par- 
liament and authorities within and without Par- 
liament. Social Insurance legislation was im- 
proved in 1911 by means of the .State Insurance 
regulations. The seamen are still, however, un- 
der a disadvantage. No changes worth men- 
tioning were introduced in the German Sea- 
men's regulations. 

No changes have been made in the semi- 
official inspection of ships, which is undertaken 
by Sea Employers' Protective Association and 
without the co-operation of the sailors -them- 
selves. 

So-called "Welfare Institutions" which have 
been established by the owners, exist only in 
Hamburg and Bremerhaven (Hamburg America 
Line and the North German I^loyd). These are 
the pension offices to which the sailors must 
pay contributions (amounting to 5 per cent, of 
their earnings), amounts out of all proportion 
to the benefits and over which the contributing 
seamen have no share in the control. Even in 
those' places where a share in the control seems 
to be guaranteed it exists only on paper and 
in actual working is only a farce and quite out 
of kceijing with our democratic principles. At- 
tempts, by means of economic and legal action 
have up to the present almost completely failed 
to effect any change. 



LABOR'S ECONOMIC PLATrORN. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suflfrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18.- Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 4L' Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205, Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

H.\N PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P, O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PETERSBURG, Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE. Wash., 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

r-EDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

2t ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. «. Wi 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Herreshoff's new America's Cup 
defender will be an enlargement of 
smaller successful types in simibr 
events with refinement of form. 

The North German Lloyd has or- 
dered from the firm of Schichau, 
Danzig, a sister ship to the "Colum- 
bus" of 35,000 tons, which the firm 
is at present building. 

Tenders are now being prepared 
by British builders in response to the 
inquiry of the Union Steamship Co. 
of New Zealand for two passenger 
steamers — one 550 feet, and the other 
520 feet long. 

The item of $8,000 for the ice pa- 
trol in the North Atlantic having 
been stricken off the appropriation 
for the U. S. Revenue Cutter Ser- 
vice, there will be no U. S. vessel de- 
tailed for such work next spring. 

A board of U. S. Engineers is 
passing upon plans for building two 
towhoats and several barges to be 
used in the Mississippi river and its 
tributaries. Congress has appropri- 
ated $500,000 for the vessels. 

During the 12 months ending Au- 
gust 31, 1913, 7,261 aliens were re- 
ceived at the Galveston station. 
This is the largest number in one 
year since 1907-08, when 9,561 aliens 
entered the United States through 
Galveston. 

The principal shipping casualties 
which occurred during August make 
up an estimated loss of .£249,600, 
compared with losses of £252,000 in 
July and £114,000 in August a year 
ago. Eleven casualties are recorded, 
as compared with ten in the July 
total. 

During the month of August, 1913, 
143 vessels of 21,151 tons gross, were 
built in the United States, of which 
IS of 9,445 tons, were steel steamers 
as follows: Atlantic and Gulf, 9 of 
6,447 tons; Pacific, 1 of 222 tons. 
Great Lakes, 2 of 2,763 tons, Western 
rivers, 3 of 38 tons. 

Former Assistant Paymaster Ar- 
thur Middleton, U. S. N., who has 
been reported as declaring that 
"snobbery" and "caste" are ram- 
pant in the United States Navy, has 
been called upon by Secretary Dan- 
iels to give specific instances of the 
evil which the former pay officer al- 
leges exists. 

Owners of the British schooner 
"Evadne," sunk in collision with the 
steamship "Santurce," in Mobile Bay, 
have filed a libel for $25,000 against 
the latter vessel. Bond was fixed at 
$30,000. A board of survey recom- 
mended the removal of the cargo, 
the raising of the vessel and docking 
for repairs. 

For the seven months ended Au- 
gust 31, 11,041,900 bushels of wheat 
were shipped from Philadelphia, 
against 9,136,608 bushels in 1912. 
Corn totaled 1,706,195 bushels, as 
compared with 676,470 bushels last 
year. Exports of coal from this port 
showed satisfactory gains during 
August. There was shipped 358,497 
tons, against 280,274 in August of the 
preceding year. 

The steamer "Tottori Maru" has 
been launched at Port Glasgow for 
the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, Tokyo, 
Japan. Length, 423 ft. 6 in.; breadth, 
56 ft.; depth 31 ft. 344 in- 1 and gross 
measurement, 5,800 tons. The en- 
gines will have cylinders 27, 44, and 
Ti, with 48 in. stroke, steam being 
supplied by three boilers under 
forced draft. The vessel has been 
built to the highest class at Lloyd's. 



Residence Phone Ballard 1639 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation Sclnool 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
202-4 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE. WASH. 



Vernon W. Buck Carl G. Benson 

BUCK, BENSON & KNUTSON 
Lawyers and Prectors In Admiralty 
Free Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia 8ts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



S«aff/e, Wath., Letter Lut. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mall forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mall until arrival. 
Abraliamsen, Jo- Johnson, A. 

hannes Jensen, Hans -2114 

Anderson, H. Jensen, G. S. 

.\ndersen, A. -1352 Johanson. Knut 
Alonzo, J. Johannesen, Olaf 

Absalomsen, O. M. Johanson, K. J. 
Alexis, H. Johanson, Theodor 

Agerup, K. B. Johnson, G. 

Andersen, O. -1719 Johnson, Olaf 
Anderson, A. -1821 Kalning. J. 
Anderson, H. Torn! Krutz, Ivan 
Anderson, Ragnvald Klebnikoff, I. W. 
.\nderson, David Korber. Th. 
Anderson, I. Kreutz, Karl 

Anderson. Hjalmar Karsima, N. 



Behr, Henry 
Burholtz, F. 
Borgen. K. S. 
Brox, H. 
Brower, G. 
Broberg, Chas. 
Buekow. C. W. 



Karrell, J. 
Kolberg, Joe 
Larsen, L. A. 
Larsen, Charles 
Little, Sid 
Ljunggren, Edmund 
Lof, Oscar 



Christensen, Anton Larson, Ing^'ald 



Crosley, J. 
Carlson, Thure 
Davidson, Jacob 
Davis. Joseph 
Pvlwik. E. 
Dall. Carl 
Ellinsen, H. O 
Enig, Herman 
Ehlert. August 
Edvardsen, Anton 
Rkwall, G. A. 
Ellison. Sam 
Eliason, C. 
Erikson, Axel 
Eskilsen, Lars 
Evanger. Nils 
Fonslund. Victor 



Larsen, Axel -1746 
Larson, John 
Lovera, P. 
Lackey, C. 
Larsen, L. 
I^arsen, John 
Larsen. A. 
Larsen, Fred 
Lundgren, K. J. 
Marks. T. 
Martins. Paul 
McPherson. R. 
McCarthy, J. 
Mortensen. J. C. 
Murphy, D. 
Mynchmeyer. H. 
Maver, J. S. 



Fredriksen. Harold Macdonald, N. 



Fjollman. Geo. 
Freeman, J. 
Franzell, A. 
F.ielstad, K. M. 
Forsen. Alex 
Fortune. John 
Framness. Ivar 
Gaugserud. O. K. 
Gehler, F. 
Grant. J. J. 
Grantley, C. W. 
Gunderson. L. S. 
Hansen, A. M. 
Hansen, Hans 
Helpap, A. 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen. N. S. 
TToglunci, Ephralm 
Hoist. L. 
Hubner, Herman 
.Taeger. F. J. 
.Tacobsen. Torglls 
Jacobsen. Johan 



Martinsen, l^iarold 
Maki. Ivar 
Mathisen, Nils 
McNeary, J. 
McDougall, J. 
Miller, J. C. 
Mikkelsen. K. 
Moore, J. M. 
Muir, J. 
Munroe, W. 
Martinsen, Ragn 

vald 
Newland E. 
Nielsen, F. M. 
Nilsen. T. H. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nelson. H. J. 
Nicholsen. F. E. 
Nilson, Andrew 
Neilsen, Edvard 
Nielsen, Alfons 
Nilsen. All>ert 
Nylund, Arthur 



1620 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

WESTERIV1AIM&.SCnERIV1ER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 

SEATTLE, WASH. 

Seattle Navigation School 

Open the entire year, 
and In touch with 

t ' ''tEJ'lt ^^~l ''test requirements. 
^ I I IT' I Candidate* thoroughly 

\ji' A.A-- ' prepared for Liceose 

-■■*' . of any grade; Master, 

%^;^ ■> Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 

"^ >^ Coast or Inland, 

By CAPT. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical College, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Master 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor In Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDING 
911 Western Ave., SBJATTLH, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anne 604 






SMOKB 




The "Popular Favorite," the ' 
Beauty," the "Princess" and 
high grade union -made cigars. 
Manufactured by 


Little 
other 




C. O'CONNOR 




612 


Fourth St. -. - Eureka 


, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 
Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda. 
Cider. Syrups. Sarsaparilia and Iron. Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-119 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Abramis, George 
Anderson, Sam 
Anderson, 

-1808 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Andersen, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Alle.xander, 



Gust, 

Nils 
Ole 
Mike 
Otto 
Erik B. 
John 



Albrechtsen, Page 
Androlio, A. 
Bergman. Karl W. 
Brodig. Wm. G. 
Bulls. Ernest 
Buckmer, W. 
Carlsen. Charlie 
Chase, W. P. 
Christensen, Albert 
Colinan, E. 
Conway, M. E. 
Collins. Frank 
Cunnichani. W. P. 
Dahl. Henry 
Day. Aca 
Dennis. Charlie 
Morft. William 
Edstrom. John 
Ehenbaugh. W. J. 
Ekham. Frans 
Fredrickson, H. G. 
Gjortz. P. 
Gordia. Piet 
Gulliksen. Amandus 
Hall. G. A. 
Hansen, Bernard 
Helin, Waldemar 
Henriks, Waldemar 
Henke, Ernest 
Hellman, Albin 
Ilelenius. Oskar 
Hohm. E. 
Huntington. E. R. 
Hoch. Gore 
Hultman, A. 
Joliansen, Johan F. 
Johnsen, Chris 
Johnson. Axel 
Johnson. Jack 
Johnson. Oie C. 
Johnson. W. 
Johnson. H. 
Kalberg. Wm. 
Karlson. K. E. 
Kenny. James 
Kealy. James 
Kikur. Allesander 
Koop. Nick 
Kronstrand. H. T. 
Kristensen. W. 
Koalvik, Oscar 
Laine. Frank 
Larsen. John 
Larsen, George 
Lurberg 



Larson, Engvald 
Larsen. Martin. 

-1710 
Larsen. Soren 
Lerch. Paul 
Lewik, Karl 
Lemarchand, Louis 
Lendeman, Ruhtii 
Lundsoor, Oskar 
Lundmark, Heege 
Lundquist. Ernest 
Macrae. Alle.xander 
Marchand, Louis 
Mattson, Maurits 
Miller. Chas. 
McManus. John 
McMahon. Jack 
Meinke, Kudolf 
Meyer. W. 
Nelson, Anton 
Nelsen, C. J. 
Nielsen, Kristian 
Nielsen. Edward 
Nilsson, Osvold 
Narberg, Jolm 
Narman. I^udwig 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Olsen, Severln 
Olsen. Ausgar 
O'Brien, Jack 
Person, Charles 
Perouse, Andre 
Petrich. Theodore 
Petersen. Aage 
Peterson. Hans 
Peterson. Heinle 
Petterson, Einar 
Pedersen. Peter 
Pratt. M. L. 
Rantio, Jacob 
Raetz. August 
Rasniussen, Thor 
Roed, Halfdan 
Sandstrom, Hugo 
Sanders, Chas. 
Simens, O. L. 
Schulz. Robert 
Saule. J. L. 
Swanson. John 
Swenson, Carl Oscar 
Saukha. August 
Swenson. John B. 
Thomas. A. 
Tamford. B. A. 
Trost. Peter 
Wall, W. H. 
Warren, Chas. B. 
Wadren. G. F. 
Westlund. Gust 
Wehl, J. 

Wiejurecht. Ernest 
Weshart. Jno. 
Welsen. J. 
Bunk. Bruno 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENGORD. Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 

Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN. Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and E 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 449 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms. Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. 8t., Eureka, CaL 

EU. SWANSON, Prop. 



HOTEL YOUNG 

European Plan 

313-315-317 SECOND ST., EUREKA 

Rooms, 25c per Night up 

Per Week, $1.50 up 

UNION LUNCH COUNTER 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PALMER, Proprietor 

A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand— Sailors' Hall — 553-R 
EUREKA 



O'Brien, J. S. 
Olsen. C. 
Olsen. Trygve 
Olsson, Brov 
Olsen. O. -1062 
Olsen. Ed 
Olsen. C. E. 
Olsen. B. -597 
Omholt. T. 
Orell, A. 
Pedersen. O. A. 
Poppe. Geo. 
Petterson. Karl 
Pedersen. Hedley 
Pedersen. P. C. 
Pedersen, Peder 



Persson. .lohan 
Petterson. Harry 
Petersen. V. -1447 
Petterson. Richard 
Petterson. S. 
Quigley. R. E. 
Rees, W. 

Skuhber. H. (Reg- 
istered) 
Stahlbaum. E. 
Stone, C. L. 
Saudburg, C. 
Schuldt. Theoder 
Seley. G. 
Sterr. W. T. 
Saar, J. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union made. 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 
Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

Eureka, CaL, Letter Lut. 



.\hlstrom. Harry 
Anderson. John 
Breien, Hans 
Clausen. Fred 
Debus. Fred 
Elilert. August 
Gudmundsen. Gud- 

rnund 
Hansen. Harald 
Ismas. Richard 



Jacobsen. W. 
Jensen, George 
Nllson. Anton 
Miller. Fred 
Publlcatus. August 
Plas. Henry 
Robertson. A. 
Syvertsen. Paul 
Thorsen. Fredrik 



.^V^iVV>^»^V^'WWS^/WN/N/S^VN/WN/>^%.%^^^.W^^^% 



Samuelson, H. 
Schultz. P. (Regis- 
tered) 
Schultz. Axel 
Scott. Alfred 
Starness. C. O. 
Storek 

Stewart. J. G. 
Strauss, W. 
St. Johns, C. R. 
Suarth. A. 
Steel. J. R. 
.^harness. C. O. 
Sperlan, B. 



Thomson. P. 
Tyghe. T. 
Thlenpoint. F. 
Thogren. David 
Thorsen. Tom 
Veasted. T. P. 
Van Loo. A. 
Verney. A. 
Waischwell. A. 
W.arner. Jake 
Waters. L. A. 
Wehde. F. 
Wessman. John 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



^^^^^^^<^^^^^^^'^WW^^^<^V%^N/WVN<%^^WA^*«^ 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAQE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 

TacomOt Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Berglind, Erik 
Conley, J. H. 
Dehler, Alfred 
Christensen, Albert 
Dehler, Alfred 
Ellison, Harry H. 
Eidsvoog, Fetter 
Fors, Alfred 
Grovefl Albert 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, .Johannes 
Hangen, Arthur 
Hetman, Walter 
Iversen, Ivar 



Jorgensen, Peter A. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Kesler, Karl 
Kathy, A. 
Melgail, M. 
Moren, G. H. 
Nilsson, Edvin 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Persson, John 
Plesner, Levi J. 
Person, Fritz 
Petterson, J. M. 
Simonsen, Sigvald 
Seblom, John 
Thorsen, Axel L. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Unlen-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & Kati, Just 
around th» corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. E. Coon, Prea. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

Wholesale and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsand, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson, -1283 
Aalto, Waino • 
Andersen, F. C. 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Arntzen, Werner 
Armstrong, Harry 
Berger, C. 
Behn, Alfred 
Brown, C 
Caristrom, John 
Christensen, Albert 
Carson, Edward 
Duval, Bennet 
Edwardsen, Anton 
Finth, Richard 
Flatten, James 
Granberg, Eric 
Graf, Otto 
Glass, Gustav 
Hohn, Arthur 
Herman, Axel 
Hansen, Ove 
Johansen, Harry 
Jensen, Harry 



Kaiser, Fred 
Kallio, Frans 
Loining, Hermand 
Ljungberg, Herman 
Lengtssen, Gottfried 
Laine, Herman 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Mertz, G. 
Mekerman, Ernest 
Nikolin, E. Miko 
Olsen, Nils 
Oksanen, Juko 
Peterson, Axel 
Petersen, Christian 
Rommel, Andrew 
Stangeland, Peter S. 
.Schacht, li. 
Thorn, -70 
Walder, Olsen N. 
Wincl, Jacob, -1357 
Zoerb, Walter 
Packages. 
Hansen, Jolm 
MacGuire, O. F. 



RAYMOND, WASH. 



THE OLYMPIC CLUB 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, POOL 
and BILLIARDS 

All Daily Papers — Coast 
Seamen's Journal 

RAYMOND WASHINGTON 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Axel Peterson, F. Lundberg, J. 
Gustafson, M. Garcia, crew of the 
steamer Riverside, at the time she 
towed in the Oceana Vance, kindly 
call at the office of the Charles Nel- 
son Co. for money due them. 

Victor N. Kvenen, a native of 
Belgium, age 32, last heard of in 
Ashtabula, Ohio, April, 1909, inquired 
for by his brother John Kvenen, 
Route 2, Raleigh, Tenn. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 




ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI ® CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chris Peterson Express 

Prompt, Car«ful Service 

Phone 691 Stand: 

At Sailora' Union Office 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street ... Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "Tlie Red Front" 



When on Gray's Harbor Smoke 

Grandmont Cigars, 10c. 

Union Pilot, 5c. 

Best Union Made Cigars on 
the market. 



Headqiurters for 

UNION MADE GOODS 

Clothing, Furnishing Goods 

Boots, Shoes, Hats, Etc. 

ALEXANDER'S WHITE HOUSE 

403 East Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

next to Burnett's Jewelry Store 



^V^^*^^^«'ta*W^^W^W^^rW^VS^S/V>^VS*^%^V^'^i'VN.^ 



Palace Restaurant 

Joe and Steve, Proprietors 

Open All Night 

THE BEST ON THE MARKET 

SERVED IN A HURRY 

4201/2 E- Heron St., Aberdeen, Wash. 



BURNETT BROS 



LEADING JEWELERS AND 
DIAMOND MERCHANTS 



Watch and Chronometer Repairing 
and Renting 

BURNETT BROS., ABERDEEN. WASH. 



Bassett News and 
Drug Co. 

ABERDEEN, WASH. 

DRUGS, BOOKS, STATIONERY 

We Specialize on Medicine Chests 

Agt. S. F. Examiner, Ciironicle & Call 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE. 
Very best union made Hlckey Slilrts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, Shoes, 
Underwear, Beddings, Tobaccos, and no- 
tions for seafaring men. 

NYMAN BROS. 

304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

Near Sailors' Union Hall 

Open Evenings. 



Gloss Steam Laundry 

(Incorperated) 

UNION LAUNDRY 

Phone 375 

Foot of G St., ABERDEEN, WASH. 



Bassett News Q Drug Co. 

Headquarters 
SAN FRANCISCO PAPERS 

Moved to New Location: 

303 E. URSHKAH ST., ABERDEEN 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
New Orleans, La. 

George Campbell is inquired for 
by his mother. He is supposed to 
sail out of San Francisco. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify Mrs. Elizabeth Campbell, 655 
31st Avenue, Vancouver, B. C. 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal 



Phone 342 Box 843 

HOTEL OXFORD 

JOHN GRONOW, Prop. 

Rooms by the week $1.50 up. 

208-12 HERRON STREET 

Aberdeen, Washington 

^^Z^wTIIXr^leT^ 

GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

All Union Made Goods 

203-5 G Street, 
Aberdeen ... Washington 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Andrew John Anderson, who left 
Aberdeen, Wash., on lumber barge 
Washtura for San Francisco, is in- 
quired for. Any one knowing his 
present whereabouts please notify 
Mrs. Anna Anderson, Aberdeen. 

John Rebbetad, who was in the 
steamer A. F. Lucas in November, 
1911, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Coast Seamen's Journal. 

William Fayette White, whose 
mother died recently, is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please address S. A. 
White, 106 W. Salem Ave., Roanoke, 
Va. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship Puritan at San Francisco, 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

Mrs. Alice Phillips wishes to hear 
from her husband, Tom Phillips. 
Write to 35 Sussex St., Sydney, N. 
S. W., Australia. 

Fritz Rohnstock, a fireman on the 
Coast steamers, is inquired for by his 
relatives. 



California's wealth was placed at 
more than $5,000,900,000, or an aver- 
age of $8500 for every family of 
five. 

One thousand pupils of three Syra- 
cuse high schools were suspended 
following a strike as a protest 
again.st new hours of study. 

Four were killed, twenty injured, 
and one man is missing as the result 
of an explosion in a mixing house 
of the Dupont Powder Company, at 
Gibbstown, New Jersey. 

Half a million persons viewed the 
funeral cortege of Mayor William 
J. Gaynor, of New York, the pro- 
cession passing through a lane of 
humanity eight miles long. 

.\ report of the first month's oper- 
ation of the Nevada liability law 
sliowed that it was gaining in popu- 
larity and that payments of forty- 
three claims exceeded $8000. 

Secretary Bryan gave the Cuban 
Government assurances that the Uni- 
ted States had no desire to inter- 
vene in the suit to prevent annul- 
ment of concessions of the Com- 
pania de los Puertos de Cuba for 
improvement of Cuban harbors. 

Secretary of State Bryan defied his 
critics, and while he confirmed the 
report that his Chautauqua engage- 
ments would end at Warrenton, Va., 
he asserted, in a hurriedly diciated 
statement, that he would lecture 
again whenever he deemed it ad- 
visable. 

"Man failure" all along the line 
was held by the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission to account for the 
numerous wrecks on the New Haven 
railroad, and both the operating man- 
agers and the difectors were found 
responsible for the disregard of safe- 
ty regulations on the part of the 
men. 

President Wilson, in his first an- 
nual message to Congress, will, it 
is announced, urge consideration of 
the establishment of an armor plate 
factory. The appointment of Captain 
Joseph Strauss as Chief of the Bu- 
reau of Ordnance, to replace Admiral 
Twining, was regarded as significant 
of the administration's support of the 
proposal. 

Mayor Grace, of Charleston, .S. C, 
filed a petition with Speaker Champ 
Clark, asking that Representative 
Richard S. Whalen, of the First 
South Carolina Congressional Dis- 
tricl, be expelled, alleging that as a 
candidate, Mr. Whalen spent $6000 
buying votes; exceeded the Federal 
expense limit, and that he committed 
perjury in his campaign statement. 

Wreckers working to raise the 
I'>icsson Line steamboat "Penn" 
have decided to build a cofferdam 
around the sunken vessel. The 
steamer sank at her pier in Phila- 
delphia recently following a fire 
which did considerable damage. It 
was at first believed that the boat 
could be hoisted to the surface by 
the use of powerful pumps and pon- 
toons, but the cofferdam plan has 
been found more feasible. The cof- 
ferdam will be similar to the one 
placed around the battleship "Maine," 
in Havana Harbor. When it is built 
aroiuiil the craft the pumps will be 
placed in action and the water re- 
moved, while pontoons will be used 
to lift the vessel. No change in the 
steamship's position is visible above 
the water. Two divers, working for 
four hours at a time, are doing most 
of the work. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Labor News. 



San FranciBco Letter List. 



All agrceiucnt which ends tlie Gal- 
veston Dock Workers' strike has 
been reached. This strike affected 
3,500 men. 

The strike instituted by the San 
Francisco Cloakmakers' Union for 
the purpose of establishing the union 
shop and the eight-hour day, in- 
creased wages and improved condi- 
tions, is progressing favorably. The 
principal object of the strike is the 
securing of more wages for the 
women engaged in this industry, 
some of whom have been receiving 
as low as $4 per week. 

Secretary Morrison reports tliat 
the membership of the Federation 
for August, 1912, was 1,829,550, while 
llio iiiemljership for August, 1913, 
stood at 2,078,597, showing a gain 
of 249,047. The average member- 
ship for eleven months ending Au- 
gust 31, 1912, was 1,764,545, while 
the average membership for the 
eleven months ending August 31, 
' 1913, was 1,986,936, or an average 
gain of 222,391. 

Railroad men over thirty-eight 
years of age, who lose their posi- 
tions through any cause, are known 
as "broken rails," according to tes- 
timony given before the arbitration 
board in the trainmen's wage con- 
troversy by a freight conductor on 
the Baltimore and Ohio railroad. 
"Few railroad men over the age of 
thirty-eight who lose their positions 
can get others or fit themselves for 
any other line of work," was added. 
When asked if he would rather re- 
ceive $4.18 a day on a train with a 
single engine, or double that for 
working on a train with two engines, 
the conductor replied tliat he would 
rather have the $4.18. 

During the recent dock strike at 
Superior, Wisconsin, the Great Nor- 
thern Railway shipped in many strike 
breakers; as is customary, the ques- 
tion of fitness was not considered, 
numbers being the thing to be 
achieved in order to awe the strikers. 
It appears that many men were 
shipped in who were physically in- 
capacitated to endure the hardships 
imposed upon dock workers. When 
the strike ended then the company 
sought employes who were qualified. 
.A.S a result there have been left a 
number of strike breakers in that 
section who are appealing for as- 
sistance at the hands of the county. 
While the county officials assert that 
the Great Northern Railway should 
care for these people, yet the afore- 
said railroad pursues the even tenor 
of its way, and the county is footing 
the bill. 

Employers of labor in Texas have 
associated themselves together for 
the specific purpose of disobeying 
the new workmen's compensation 
act. It seems that a large number 
of employers in Texas have joined 
some sort of a combination which 
has its headquarters in Kansas City, 
and which has undertaken to fight 
the new workmen's compensation 
law. The officials of the new asso- 
ciation advise that no pretense be 
made to obey the law, with the hope 
undoubtedly that with unanimity on 
the part of the employers of labor, 
the law can be made a dead letter. 
This is the most brutal position taken 
by employers that has ever occurred, 
and is undoubtedly taken with the 
idea that those who receive injuries 
can be settled with cheaper as indi- 
viduals than by a compliance with 
the law. 



I.ettcrs at the San Fr.-incisco Sailors' 
I'nion Office are advertised for tliree 
iiiontlis only and will be returned to the 
I'ost Office at ttie expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt. Head(iuartcrs Sailors' Union. 
San Fram-isco. to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abraham. A. M. 
AlanKo, Peter 
Albors. Arne 
Alexi, Hakon 
Alver, Ben 
Andersen, Albert 
Andersen, Carl 

Osker 
Andersen, Fred 
Andersen, H. J. 
Andersen, -1526 
Andersen, -176.') 



Anderson, Josef 
Anderson, O. 
Anderson, Peter 
Anderson, S. 
Anderson. Thorus 

H. 
Anderson, V. -992 
Anderson, Victoria 
Anderson, Wm. 
Andersson, A. -1813 
Anders. Fred 
Andersson. -17.S1 



Andersen, Kristian Aner, Wm. 



Anderson. Alex 
Anderson, Arnold 
Anderson. Arvid 
Anderson, Carl 
.Xnderson. David 
Anderson, F. 
Anderson, G. 
Anderson. Jim 
Anderson. John 
Ba.s-, Willy 
Rakher, Haakon 
Ballot, .Tohn 
Kankc. Harold 
T!avdsen, F. 
Harr. Gustav 
Barton, W. F. 
Baumert, -2024 
Bausbeck. Erwin 
HeaiisanK. Kugine 
Beckly. Chr. 
Reg.!?, John 
Behrens, Herman 
Bekker, George 
Reling:, Oscar 
Bcllos, Jack -2036 
Rendsen, Harry 
Renson, A. 
Benson, Helge 
Bentsen, Lars 



And Strom, Axel 
Applequest. Otto 
Apsit. J. 
Arndt, Mike 
Arneeke, Carl 
Arvldsson. Hjalmar 
Asp, G. L. 
Asplund. Karl O. 
Ayers, W. D. 
Bierstet -1736 

Bilke. Edw. 
BillinAlon, Martin 
Rlair. Francis 
Blank. Georg 
Piindhelm, O. C. 
Blodsing, Aug. 
Bluchner. Frank 
Rluniel, W. 
Roe, Karl C. 
Roers, M. 
Rohm, Kniil 
Rordin, Hans 
Boyes, C. 
Bovs. Al. 
Bradley, Clifford 
Brander, W. 
Brennel, Woldemar 
Brennusen. Otto 
Brims. H. W. 



Johaiisen, 
Johansen, 
Johansen, 
Johansen, 
Johansen. 
Johansen. 
Johansen, 
Johanson, 
Johansen. Oscar 
Johansen, H. B. 
.Joliaiisoii, Nils B. 
Johansen. W. 
Johanson. -2104 
Johanson. S. A. 
Johansson. Johan 
Johnsen, Oscar 



Arthur 
C. 

Carl 
Chas. 
Harold 
-] SiiS 
-2021 
Ole 



Johnson. 
Johnson. 
Johnson. 
.b)hnscin. 
V.Johnson. 
.Johnson. 



-2198 
C. E. 
E. 

Kniil 
Kric 
H. L. 



Jiihnsiin. John A. 
Johnson. J. Julius 
Johnson. -420 



Johnson. 
Johnson, 
Johnson. 
Jonsson. 
Johnson. 
.Johnson 



John 
O. 

William 
Oscar 
Steve 
Walter 



Johnsen 
Johnsen. 
Johnsen, 
Johnson. 
Johnson. 
Kaasik 



-2213 
-1343 
Hans 
B. 

Berdines 
A. 



Jones. Chas. 
Jorgensen. Andrew 



Jor^ons 
Jorgensen. 
Julison, C. 



:236 
Fred 



Kallberg. Arvid 
Kalnin, E. 
Karlsen. Gustav 
Kardinal. O. 
Karlsen. Hans 
Karstin. Hugo 
Kearns. H. 
Keinanen. Walter 
Kelly. I. F. 
Kerboy. Karl 



Fred 
J. 



Kleibingat. 
Kllnker. C. 
Kluge. Frank 
Kninllng. F. 
Koak. Hermann 
Kohlmeistcr, Otto 
Kohne. Ernest 
Kolodziek. Joseph 
Koop. J. F. 
Krohn. Heinrieh 
Krohn, John 



Ruute. O. Uylke. Otto 

K.verson. George K. 



Kermagoret, AnatoleKristensen. A 



Bergman. Waldemar Bringarud. Harold 

Borgsirom, C. ^ """'^ " " 

Bergstrom. P. 

Bergcjuist. Emil 

Bernhard. Oscar 

Bospesen, Olaf 

Calne, V. 

Cain, P. 

Gallon, Jose 

Cambrou, G. 0. 

Canipbel. Geo. 

Campbel, Wm. H. 

Cannon, Alex. 

Cannon. Ed. 

Carlsen. Shure F. 

Carlson, Gustag 

Ca- Ison. O. S. 

Carroll. A. R. 

Carlsson, A. G. 

C'arlsson. R. T. 

Ceilan. John 

Chaler. Buntista 

Dahlgren. Niels 

Daniolsen, David 

Davey. C. 

Delias. James 

Dehler. Alfred 

Deswert. William 

Dillon. Patrick 

Dixon. John 

Dohmann. 

Dohman. Fred 
Eoonen, Albert 
Edgerton, Jack 
Edlund, Konrad 
Egeland. O. O. 
Klilert. August 
Kinardt. John 
Kisenhart. H. 
Ekendahl. W. 
Ekwall. Gust 
Elholm, Peter 
Fjellman. Jonas 
Forde. Charles 
Foregn. William 
Foerg. Wm. 
Form. Frank 
Fors. Alfred 
Franke. Karl 
Eraser -740 
Fraudsen. L. M. 
Garbers. Gustav 
Garbrick. Luis 
Garrlnen. V. 
Geelman. PJacob 
Geiger. Joe 
Giftord. S. 
Gilje. Severin 
Glannus, Alex 
Gorsch. W. 
Grana. Collin 
Grant. David 
Grauberg. Fred 
Griel, Bernhard 
Grolin, Conrad 

Haak. R. 
Haaversen, Nils 
Hagelie. Hom 
Hakassars. A. W. 
Haldin. Fred 
Hall, W. 
Hammel, Otto 
Hannus. Alex 
Hannus. M. 
Hansen. Carl 
Hansen, Chas. G. 
Hansen, C. T. 
Hansen, Emanual 
Hansen, Frank 
Hansen, Fred 
Hansen, George 
Hansen, H. 
Hansen, Hans 
H.ansen, H. G. 
Hansen, John P. 
Hansen, Marius 
Hansen, Nikolai 
Hansen. Viggo A. 
Haro. Aarv 
Hayes, J. B. 
Irwing. James 
Jrwin, Robert 
Jackson. Harry 
Jacobsen. O. F. 
Jade. Hans 
Jakobsen. Joakim 
Jamison, J. H. 
Jarl. Haakon 
Joic?kisoh, Magnus 
Jensen, Fredrick 
Jensen. G. 
Jensen. George 



Kilgore. George 
Kilson. Paul 
Kirkp.itrick. Cycll 
Klatzke. Otto 
Klausen, C. 
Ladds. Alex 
Lampka, O. 
J.angenberg. H. 
Langton. Harry 
Lanner. Rudolph 
l>aponble. Jean 
Larsen. Asmus 
Larsen. lOrik J. 
Larsen. John 
Larsen. J.,ues 
Larsen, Martin 
Larsson, Axel 



Kristiansen. Hans 
Kruliseh. Frans 
Krutlmann 
Kryger. Waldemar 
Kusik. Martin 
Lekschass, M. 
Leland, F. W. 
Lersten. J. O. 
Lind. Gus 
Lindholm, Alfred 
Lindholm, Axel 
I^indliolm, Charles 
Lister, P. L. 
Liltlestorm 
LucJe, Thorvald 
Luehrs. L. 
Lundberg, Harry 



Lasol. Conrad Thos.Lundberg. Thorsten 



Broscheld. F. O 
Brownell. W. 
Brure. P. 
Brusbard. E. 
Bung, Richard 
Christensen, Albert 
Christensen, Alfred 
Christensen. F. R. 
Christensen. Hans 
Christensen. Otto 
Christen.sen. R. H. 
Christesen. Cristens 
Christopherson, Rolf 
Classon. Henry 
na\ih.=er. Fred 
Colburn. Geo. 
Connor. Wm. 
Cook, Herman 
Corley, Howard 
Cunningham. C. 

Dories. H. 
Donaldson, F. 
Donovan. John 
Doyle. William 
Downey, W. J. 
Dracar. E. 
Dropan. Lihua 
Duks, L. 
Dunbar, Ij. L. 
Durholt, Hugo 
Ellefsen. Otto 
EUertsen, Eilert 

-875 
Elliott. Roney 
Engstrom. Charles 
Eriksen -770 
Erickson. Eric 
Ericson, E. R. 
Eskildson, Nils P. 

Fredrichs, C. 
Fredrickson. Carl 
Freeman. C. E. 
Freitag. Franz 
Fretzen. B. H. 
Frick, John 
Fridlund, John 
Froberg, Enock 

Gronbek. T. 
Gront, Otto 
GroEsel, Jasef 
Guander. Chr. 
Gudmundsen. B. 
Gulbrandsen -1009 
Guldbrandsen. Jack 
Gumoes, Frederick 
Gundersen. P. 
Gunn. F. D. 
Guckmann. Ewald 
Gusek, Ben 
Guthre, R. 

Heart, Charles 
Heiberger. M. 
Helin. Paul 
Helmer, Fred 
Helt, 1. 
Hendry. John 
Hendriksen. T. 
Hengst. Otto 
Henriksen. H. -1333 
Hermanson -1622 
Hess. Wm. 
Hewitt 

Hillig. Albert 
Hofer, Richard 
Hofgaard. Hans 
Hogan. A. 
Holt. Carl C. 
Hooner. Harbert 
Hoppner. Albert 
Hopstad. Sigurd 
Hoye. Haakon 
Hubertz. Emil 
Huntsman. Henry 
Hurst, Jack 

Iveraen, John 

Iverson, Tom 
Jansen. Hans 
Jensen. Harry 
Jensen, Ole 
Jensen, Oscar 
Jensen, C 
Jensen, H. R. K. 
Jensen. Jens 
Jensen. L. 
Jepsen. S. "W. 
Jespersen, M. 



Laughlin, J. M. 
Laurell, L. 
Lauritzen, Hans 
Laydon. D. 
Leander, Carl 
Maatson, Olaf 
Macke, David 
Madsen. Ludvjg 
Madson. M. C. 
Manse. Peter 
Marden. Alfred 
Markman. H. 
Maittiis, H. -1S02 
.Martensen, I. C. 
Martin, T. K. 
Martin. H. 
Martin. Jack 
Marton. H. 
Marx. T. B. 
Martens. Hans 
Mass. Ernst 
Mathews. John 
Matson. Morris 
Mattson, A. M. 
Mattson, -1S18 
Mayes. J. B. 
Mayers. Edgart J. 
McCarty. P. 
McCourt, Joseph 
McGaldrich. James 
MoKai. J. W. 
McKeating. R. 
Nanjack, Gustav 
Naystrom. Victor 



Vorald 

B. 

W. 
J. T. 
Hans 

G. L. 



Lundh. Harry 
Lund. William 
Lundqulst. Ernest 
Lundquist. 
Lyche. H. 
McKenna, 
McKenzie. 
McMahon, 
Meislahn, 
Mellander, 
Merteiis, 11. 
Messman. A. 
Michelsen, Alfred 
Mickelson. Martin 
Milas, Peter 
Miller, W. -2116 
Minor, C. F. 
Moen, Robert 
Moller, John 
Monsen, Tollef 
Morris, Oscar 
Morris. W. 
Morrison, A. 
Morris. Reuben 
Mossier, Larence 
Mud da. A. 
Muiphneek. W. 
MuUer. John 
Murphy, Ch. 
Murphy. Edward 
Murry, Edw. 
Myrhoy, Jens P. 
Nielsen, Jacob 
Nielson, John 



R. 



Neergaard, Anton C.Nielsen. N. J. 



Neilsen. Edward 
Nellsen, J. C. 
Nelson. C. 
Nelson. Hans 
Nelson. Hans H. 
Nelson, Lewis 
Nelson, N. C. 
Nerby. Kristian 

Nesbitt, 

Nesbitt. J. 
Nest. Filip 
Newman. F. 
Newman. Tom 
Nielsen. Ed. 
Nichander, Dan 
Nick, Peter 
Oberhauser, John 
Oelrichs. Paul 
Oetjen, Fred 
John 
P. 
Arne -244 
Charles 
Charles A. 
Dolp'n 
F. -1294 
Hans -794 
Harold 
John 
O. 

Olof D. 
Olsen. Oscar F. 
Pahlgren, Pete 
Paludan, C. 
Parsons, Herman 
Patterson, P. A. 
Paulsen, G. 
Pearson. J. T. 
Pearson. J. 8. 
Pedersen. Alfred 
Pedersen. H. -1263 
Pedersen -1561 
Pekman. Emest 
Pelsckhur 
Pennell, Jim 
Pernki, C. 
Person, Leonard 

John 
Persson, 0. -678 
Peters, J. 
Petersen, Axel L. 
Petersen. Carl W. 
Petersen, C. -1403 
Petersen. C. G. 
Petersen, Christian 
Petersen, Henning 
Petersen, Kristian 
Petersen, L. -1167 
Quinlan, Thomas 
Raash. Otto 



Nielsen, Pete 
Nilsen, Anders 



Nilsen, 
Nilsen, 
Nilsen, 
Nilsen. 
Nilson. 



Oliver. 

Olman. 

Olsen. 

Olsen, 

Olsen, 

Olsen, 

Olsen. 

Olsen. 

Olsen, 

Olsen. 

Olsen, 

Olsen. 



Anton 

Hai.s 

Michael 

N. 1. 

Axel 
Nordling. Sven 
Nordstrom. Victor 
Norman, Fred 
Norris, Ed. 
Norris. N. A. 
Nurhanen, Evert 
Nybei-g, Berger, 

-1146 
Nylund. John 
Olsen. Oscar Wll- 

helm 
Olsen. -845 
Olson. Henrik 
Olsson, -677 
Olsson, -1187 
Olund. Chas. 
O'Neil. Jas. 
Opitz, G. 
Orfano. Vappo 
Osterberg. J. 
Osterhoff. H. 
Otto. Willi 
Ottun. Aksel 
Owens. Fred 
Owens. John 
Petersen, I'aul 



Saalman, Joseph 
Saar. J. 
Sahlinan, Chas. 
Salzer, Julius 
Sammis. C. J. 
Saniuelsen. I.,eonard 
Sarde. Alex 
Saue, Fred 
Saunders. Jim 
Schankat, H. 
Schfluer. A. 
Schellenberg. H. 
Scher. G. 
Schmidt. Hans 
Schneider. H. 
Schroder. F. A. 
Schi-oder, H. -2601 
Sc' I'lpster, B. 
Schultz, O. L. A. 
Schulz. Alfred 
Seagren. .Johan 
Soel.ind. Slgfrid 
Seibert. Henry 
Selander. W. 
Senger. George 
Shager. Ernest L. 
Shultman. Jacob 
Shults. Max 
Sick. Herman 
Sikman, Andrei 
Silva. A. 

Simniiinfls. William 
Silva. Emil 
S.iarbt(in. Karl H. 
Skedsmo. A. 
Skoglund. Harry 
Skozm.in. Wm. A. 
Smith. Donald 
Smith. F. O. 
Smith. Johan 

Tahtinen. Hjalmer 
Tammon. Chr. 
Ten.=on. J. 
ThoMias, Henry 
'i'liomel. Martin 
'i'liorkilsen. Jonas 
'I'horne. Richard 
Thorsen. Aksel 
Thorscn. Jens 
Tietjen. B. H. 
Tillix. Hans 
Tobiasson. Joel 
Touipson. L. C. 
Torgersen, H. 



1158 



Peterson 

Peterson. 

Peterson, 

Peterson. 

Peterson. 

Peterson. 

Peterseon 

Pettersen, 

Petterson, 

Pettersson 



Kd. 

Fred. 

H. 

Johan 

L. -1389 

Oscar 
Chaa. 
Fredrick 
John G. 
C. H. 



Petron, A. 
Petz, Gottfried 
Pfeifer, B. 
Philii)S. Max 
Pitkanen. J. W. 
Pitsckkur. Wald 
Plas. M. 
Plottner. Fred 
Pock. James 
Poppe, Geo. 
Porin. A. L. 
Prinz. Carl 
Publlcatus, August 
Punis. Antony 
Purgold, G. E. 



Robertson, 



John 
Rammerdahl, Knud Robertson. R. 
Ransohl. Emil Regis. A. 

Rasmussen. Andrew Rohan. Billy 



Rebman. Chas. 
Redmond. Th. 
Reinhold. Ernest 
Rellas. Jack 
Revidan. John 
Richter. Niels 
Riegel. W. -1070 
Ringeling. J. 
Rivera, John 
Roalsen, Fred 



Max 



Rohland. 
Rog, A. 

Roscheck. Paul 
Rosbeik. Gustav 
Rosenfeld. Paul 
RoBlln. R. 
Rounberg. Edward 
Rudberg, Charlie 
Rundquist. O. 
Russell, Jim 



Smith. J. S. -2126 
Smyth, Wm. 
Snell. Adolf 
Soder. J. 
Soderlund. Uno 
Sonnenberg. J. 
Sorensen, Hans 
Sorensen, Henry 
Sorensen. John H. 
Sorensen, Michael 
Sorensen. Peter 
Sorger. K. 
Sovchnes. P. Olaf 
Spark. A. V. 
Speikman, Max 
Sping, James 
Stahlbaum, Eber- 

hardt 
Stanford. Max 
Stenroes. Frans 
Stevensen. August 
Stinessen. Harold 
Stolt. A. J. 
Stoltzerman, E. 
Sti-and. Konrad 
Strand, Louis 
Strasdin. Hans 
Strauss. Walter 
Stromsberg. Ivar 
Stuart. James G. 
Sundberg. K. K. 
Sundquist. Ernest 
Svensson, G. H. 

-1295 
Swanson, E. -2675 
Swanson. L. E. 
Swanson, Ole 
Swan. W. S. 
Swarthey, Jack 
Swarthey. Norman 

Torgussen. .\ndrew 
'J'orpensen. Guwald 
Torsgren. Carl 
Torstenson. F. 
Tovares, Antonio 
Taivola. G. 
Trede. Hans 
Treucrek 
'I'rost. A. R. P. 
Truback. H. 
Tuck. W. 
Tulujonscki. Carl 
Tuppit. C. 
Twalg, F. 



Uhlig. Carl Usar, T. 

TJrsIn. J. 

Vaks. Theodore K. Volkanen, Veda 
Valtti, Jalmar Void. O. P. 

Van Katwyk, John Vortman. W. 
Velure, Hilge 



W^ahlberg, Reed 
Wakioom. Jolm 
VValch. Micliael 
W.ilkers. Fred 
Wallus. Fred 
Wells, Frank 
Walters. Henry 
Wank, Uoni.in 
Wathsteci, Albert 
Watti. Jalmar 
Welch. L. 
Wendel. Emil 
Westman. Andrew 
Weitgren, I. M. 
Yanger, I. 
Ziehr. Ernest 
Zoe. Frank 
Zoerb. Walter 
Zorb, W. 



Weyer. Paul 
WiUart. Fred 
\\'hinner. VV. 
Whiteworth 
Wiiehim, Edward 
Williams. Thomas 
Willman, Frank 
Wilson, John E. 
Winblact. M. M. 
Winther. Johan 
Wolferen. Svan 
Woller. John 
Work. Johan 

Yoivola, Gust 
Zorlng. Arthur 
Zunbauer, Karl 
Zunk, Rumo 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Olaf 



.4nder\>on, A. 
Anderson, Anders 
Aiidrcason, -1477 
Balda. A. 
Bay. George 
Ruas. Tomas 
Christoffersen, 
Ellefsen, Otto 
Faulkner, J. 
Gasman, Geo. A. 
Ginnoes. F. 
Hansen. Chr. M. 
Haniien, Karl 
Iversen. Reidar 
Jolianson. Nils A. 
Julinson. W. 
Jorgensen, Jorgen 
.forgensen, Oluv 
Kaasik. August 
Knappe. Adolph 
Korsberg. Wolmar 
Lai sen, Hans 



Laydon. D. 
Llndroth, Erik 
Lundgren. K. G. 
Maatson. Olaf 
Nelsson. Hasmund 
Noidling. Sven 
Olsen, -1244 
Olsen. Olaf D. 
Prieberg. P. 
Publicatus. August 
Kaasch. U. 
Rasmussen, B. 
Rose. Wm. H. 
Kutter. T. 
Straus. Walter 
Summers. James 
Torkildsen. Jonas 
Trondsen, J. M. 
Wakely. R. E. 
Wallers. .Mbert B. 
Welsen. Julius 
Wlllander. -876 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 



Andersen. F. K. 
Bensen. John 
Bang. R. O. 
Cefalia. Vinzenco 
Eriksen, Johan 
Husby. Lars 
Hansen, C. 
Jansson, Carl 
Johansen, Johan 
Johanson, E. O. 
Johansen, A. E. 
Johansen, Amiel 



Lundgreen, G. Karl 
Lundcjuist. Otto 
Larsen, Julius 
Lidsten, C. 
Osterlund, Albert 
Olson. Nels 
Peterson. Carl 
Peterson. Frank V. 
Roelfs. J. 
Remmert, J. 
Widlund, O. E. 
Walrath, G. O. 



Seattle. Wash. 



H. 



Abolln, Adam 
Borgen, K. Sigurd- 
sen 
Pa hi. Ben. 
Fister, Johannes 
Finnigan. I. H. 
Hagen. Gunder 
Jensen, Gustav 
Johansen. Ingvald 
Jdlinson. Axel 
Nelson. Nels WU- 

helm 
I^arsen. Fred 
Magnuson, P. A. 



Osterlund, Albert 
Olsson. Slgfrid 
Peterson, Andrew K. 
Phister, Albert 
Polhome. Mr. 
Ridderstaft, Ernest 
Rye. F. M. J. 
Selback. Chris. 
Slinnlng, Rasmus O 
Spellman. Tom. 
Starks. John 
Stein. George G. 
Stixrud. Jack 
Stromsness Oscar 



Pt. Townnend Letter List. 



Andersen. E. T. 
Alango. John 
Hermansen. L. 
Johansen. John 
Johnson. Ole 
Moore. George 



Mertz. George E. 
Nachtigall. H. 
Rosbeck. Gustaf 
Shold. Chas. A. 
Varner. C. 
Wilson, Gus 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



15 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORNEY -AT- LAW 

Pacific Building, Room* 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

lianks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt 

and Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. 
W. Corner Clement and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere. 

June 30, 191.3: 

Assets $55,644,983.27 

Capital actually paid up in 

Cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,757,148.57 
Employees' Pension Fund.. 158,261.32 
Number of Depositors 62,134 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock A. M. to 3 
o'clock P. M., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock M. and Saturday evenings from 
6:30 o'clock P. M. to 8 o'clock P. M. 
for receipt of deposits only. 



DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week. Electric Lights, 
Call Bells and Hot and Cold Water In 
every room. Elevator Service. 

AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 




CAPT. CHAS. J. 
SWANSON 

Classy Clothier 

Hatter and Furnisher 

Douglas Shoes 

Uniforms 



Gold Braid and Gold 

Wreaths of All 

Descriptions 



139 EAST STREET 

Between Merchant and 
Washington 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 1082 



Capt Chas. J. Swanson 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front St. and Broadway, op- 
posite Pacific Coast S. 8. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Kearny 2503 

HOTEL COLCHESTER 

259 East St., Cor. of Jackson 
Rates: 30c per Day up, $1.75 per 
Week up. 

Hot and Cold Water In Every Room. 
Free Baths and Showers. 

Telephone Kearny 1534 

Hotel Albion 

NICELY FURNISHED ROOMS 

Rooms from 30c and Up a Day and $1.75 
and Up a Week. Hot and Cold Water. 
Free Baths. 

:: BELL AND ELEVATOR SERVICE :: 
25 Clay Street, San Francisco 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Union-made Shoes 

HATS, CAPS, FURNISHING 

GOODS, ETC. 
Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East St., and 4 Mission St., 
San Framcisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



UNITED STATES WATCH CLUB 

FINE WATCH REPAIRING 



E. F. COLLINS, Manager 



10 EAST STREET S. W. Corner Market 

SAN FRANCISCO 



When Drinking Beer 
See tliat this Label is 
on the Keg or Bottle 



B^^ ^m^^mk^ ^ 



rH^' 



llnion 

MADE 

5eer ^ ^ 

""^feio OF America ric^xr 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 




\ 

•Ale 

AND 

Porter 



^<^ -H /f >^"^ W J^ ■"•"* W~^ ^^ Sec that this label (in light 
^^^ l^^l B^ 31^^ I ^ ff^^ ^^^ blue) appears on the box in 



which you are served. 



Issued by AuUlorilyof tne Cigar MaKers' International Union of America. 

Union-made Cigars. 

ShtS <En1tfif;S. Iim tin a^x^ «»iuined IntWi V» ba« tw mta by t hClCMSS mUfaBIl 

i tiLHtir. OF THE OCAfi UAJtm 'iNimKATioNW. uwoNrf Amriu. in <tiurii*m devoid) b the ad 

vanttmeni ol ttie MOWi >MTtRWl,iiij iNiadCHlAI WUtAKOf TH£ OWT IbntfanmiKmaat 

thf M Cioars U) ^1 snwhefs OirouaNiut Um mxU 

' AJJ MTingvMflU upon tius LateJ w bfl punubad Kctfding to tasl. 



' SiaiLE 



^ }1C (^A4eu<4. Ptradent, 
V CMtU«, 



^fAm ari ea 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Reiar Gundersen is inquired for by 
his brother, B. C. Gundersen. Any- 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
communicate with the Coast Sea- 
men's Journal. 

John West, who was on the 
steamer Horatius in June, 1912, is 
inquired for by P. Ivers, River Dar- 
ling, via Wenthworth, Australia. 
Please notify Sup't, No. 1 State 
street. New York. 



JORTALL BROS. EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 
206 EAST ST., San Francuco 

Phone Douglas 5348 

Telephone Kearny 4186 

Carlsen © Marchand 

Motor Express and Baggage Room 
Sailors' Baggage Stored & Cared For 
10 MISSION ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Bet. East and Steuart Sts. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Rudolph Kurella, born January 5lh, 
1868, at Graliowo, Germany, is in- 
(|uire(l for liy the German Consul- 
General at .San Francisco, Cal. 

John Hansen, who was lookoutman 
on the S.S. "Argyll" some months 
ago, is wanted by the Union Oil Co. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify the manager Marine 
Department, Mr. Walter G. Tubby, 

Oscar Osolin, John Lind, M. 
Elonc, John Anderson, Thomas Puk- 
ki, Alex. Tuominen, Chas. Grouberg, 
who were on board the steamer "Fi- 
fild" April 7, 1913, please communi- 
cate with the Coast Seamen's Jour- 
nal. 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUPACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglat 16S0 



^VWW^^^^^^^^^^^^^V^^^VS^W.s^^^^'Vs^w>^^^«i^^ 




INFORMATION WANTED. 

Carl Johan Nilsen, a native of 
Sandefjord, Norway, aged about 22, 
left his home at 1164 Potrero Ave., 
Sunday. August 17th. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Coast Seamen's Journal. 




Tlie strike of the railroad men in 
tlie British Isles was practically 
)rought to an end. 

It was reported that the second 
daughter of King Alfonso of Spam 
ike his second son, was a deaf mute. 

The London Labor Congress voted 
to send a shipload of provisions to 
the strikers in Dublin, Ireland. 

An international congress on alco- 
lolism, at which American organiza- 
tions are represented, was held re- 
cently in Milan. 

Tlie strike of omnibus men in 
London was settled, the men gained 
the chief points for which they con- 
tended. 

Swiss troops concluded a program 
of military manoeuvres above the 
clouds by storming Mount Eggis- 
horn, 10,000 feet high. 

Captain von Wcsternhagen, an of- 
ficer in the German army reserves, 
was shot and killed by Heinrich 
Maas, a court painter. 

The speech from the throne, pre- 
pared by the new Dutch Cabinet, an- 
nounced that a bill was to be pre- 
pared granting suffrage to women. 

.\r\ Italian general and 22 of his 
nfificers and men were killed in a Imt- 
tle with Arab tribesmen in Tripoli. 
The Arabs were defeated. 

The Hansa League requested the 
German Government to investigate 
the relations of the "tobacco trust" 
with the German cigarette industry. 

The l)0(lics of four Alpine climb- 
rrs, who had been missing since 
Sei)tenil)er 12, were found in the 
LTpper Engadine. 

Fire, probably of. incendiary origin, 
destroyed Theobald's Park, the $500,- 
000 mansion of Admiral Sir Hed- 
worth Lambton-Meu.x, at Waltham 
Cross, England. 

Protests by students who were to- 
tal al)stainers against a "beer eve- 
ning" at Greifswald University, Ger- 
many, led to their expulsion from 
the university. 

A pitched battle, in which 120,000 
men were engaged, was the closing 
feature of the French army mano- 
euvres. It was witnessed by Presi- 
dent Poincare. 

Two directors of the Hanscatic 
I'ank, Hamburg, were arrested, 
charged with misappropriation of 
funds. The loss, it was announced, 
will reach $775,000. 

The parliamentary correspondent 
of the Liverpool Courier declared 
that the British Government had de- 
cided to appeal to the electorate on 
tile- Home Rule bill. 

A mutiny broke out at .-Mgeciras in 
the ranks of the Royal Spanish 
(iuard, some of them refusing to 
embark for the scene of fighting in 
Morocco. One man was killed. 

The Manclicstcr Guardian an- 
nounced that the Amoric'in, British 
and German (ioNcnimcnls were con- 
sidering a jjroposal for the neutral- 
ization of the Azores, incidental to 
tlie openin.g of the Panama Canal. 

British suffragettes tried to burn 
I'eii^Iuirst Place, an historic four- 
Iccnth century mansion, at Tun- 
lirt<lge, Kent. Tlie mansion was oc- 
cupied when the attempt was made. 

'I'iie population of Styria, Austria, 
has been terrorized by the depreda- 
tions of wild beasts which escaped 
from a menagerie. Two hundred 
cattle and 400 sheep have been killed 
nd a policeman is missing. 



f 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



With the Wits. 



"Can you direct me to the best 
hotel in this town?" asked the 
stranger who, after sadly watching 
the train depart, had set his satchel 
upon the station platform. 

"I can," replied the man who was 
waiting for a train going the other 
way, "but I hate to do it." 

"Why?" 

"Because you will think after 
you've seen it that I'm a liar." — Chi- 
cago "Record-Herald." 



For four consecutive nights the 
hotel proprietor watched his fair, 
timid guest fill her pitcher at the 
water-tap. 

"Madam," he said on the fifth 
night, "if you would ring, this would 
be done for you." 

"But where is my bell?" asked the 
lady. 

"The bell is beside your bed," re- 
plied the proprietor. 

"That the bell!" she exclaimed. 
"Why the boy told me that was the 
fire-alarm, and that I wasn't to 
touch it on any account." — New 
York Weekly Telegraph. 



It was at a dinner party. The 
bright young man found himself 
privileged to sit next to the young 
woman with beautiful arms and 
neck. He thought himself the most 
favored personage in the room. Sud- 
denly his fair companion exhibited 
signs of nervousness. Two of his 
very best jokes, saved for a special 
occasion, passed by unnoticed. Her 
face wore a look of alarm. Appre- 
hensively the young man gazed at 
her and, meeting the look, she said: 

"I am in misery." 

"In misery?" echoed the man. 

"Yes," she replied. "I was vac- 
cinated the other day and it has 
taken beautifully. I could almost 
scream, it hurts so." 

The young man looked at the 
beautiful arms and seeing no marks 
there, said: 

"Why, where were you vacci- 
nated?" 

"In Sacramento," she replied, the 
smile chasing away the look of pain. 



Joint Accounts 

This bank will open accounts In the 
name of two Individuals, for Instance, 
man and wife, either of whom may 
deposit money for or draw against 
the account 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth, 
San Francisco 



Bagley's Gold 
Shore 



THE OLD RELIABLE PIPE 
TOBACCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cat. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL. 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short interval of time. 





Agent U. S. Government Charts and Nau- 
tical Publications, Hydrographic and Geodetic 

H. J. H. LORENZEN 

12 MARKET STREET 

Comer of Sacramento and Market Streets 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Dealer in 

Watches Chronometers Clocks 

Solid Gold Goods Diamonds 



MARINE & FIELD GLASSES 

NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

Watches, Chronometers and Jewelry 

Rates Determined by Transit Observations 

Chronometers and Sextants Rented 



J. COHEN & CO. 

Baltimore ClotKing Co. 

72 EAST STREET. S. F., Next to SAILORS' UNION HALL 

MADE TO ORDER SUIT CLUB 

Union Label in Coat, Vest and Pants 

OUR CUSTOMERS ARE UNION MEN. WE SELL UNION MADE 

GOODS ONLY. 

Demand the Union Label 





Christensen's Navigation Scliool 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- 
spector. As only a limited number 
of pupils will be accepted at one 
time, delay and loss of time will 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 



'Neto Retail Center" 




^Market at Fifth 



^^^/■^s^^«»i^v^^^A/s^N/^A»^•v>^•v^/v^/^/^<'^»wws■^^^^ 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 5 Stores: 

72 MARKET STREET 

1178 MARKET STREET 

605 KEARNY STREET 

2640 MISSION STREET 

26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^/^^^^^"VW^N^N^N/^^^^^^V^ 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



H, SAMUEL, 

Also known as Sam, 

Has Moved from 610 THIRD ST. to 

693 THIRD ST., opposite the 

Southern Pacific Depot at 3d 

and Townsend Streets, 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Gents' Clothing 
and Furnishings 

FurnlshlnK Ooods, Hats, Caps, Trunks, 
Valises, Bags, Etc., Boots, Shoes, Rubber 
Boots and Oil Clottilng. Seamen's Out- 
fits a specialty. 

If you want flrst-class goods at tha 
lowest market price, give us a call. Do 
not make a mistake — Look for tha Nam« 
and Number. 



JqmtsJ^ Soranien 



Eyes Examined Free Repairing Our Specialty 

WE DO REPAIRING 

SoJvmenCh 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

715 Market Street., Near Call Building 

2593 Mission Street, Near 22nd Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 

THE LARGEST JEWELRY STORE, WITH THE LARGEST 
STOCK AT THE LOWEST PRICES 

All Watch Repairing Warranted for Two Years 



OVERALLS 8. PANTS 



UNION MADE 



SI 









5ffiS5^-^ >^t^^^^SvS^gas?s ;i.ftA^\;»fe4£Si5^^i^gg^ 



FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXVII, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1913. 



Whole No. 2248. 



INDUSTRIAL UNIONISM. 



Industrial Unionism in its relation to Trade 
Unionism is a topic upon which most self- 
styled radicals love to dwell and upon which 
much gratuitous advice is dispensed by would- 
be reformers who have yet to learn the A. B. C. 
of any kind of Unionism. 

The article which follows is part of a report 
of the Executive Council of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor to the last convention of that 
body and is worthy of careful perusal by ail 
who seek knowledge upon the subject in ques- 
tion: 

Innovations, untried and superficially con- 
sidered, at varying periods often attract the 
fancy of those whose conception of progress 
seems largely founded on illusive imagination 
or fruitless commotion. 

Progress in the organized labor movement is 
the result of a natural development, and not 
the effect of new-found forms of organization. 
Cohesion in the movement is apparent in the 
same degree as education and experience brings 
understanding. Trade unionism in some form 
has an unbroken history of achievement, based 
entirely upon the proper concept of the human 
equation and a continuous regard for the rights 
of every member. This latter feature is ignored 
by the advocates of new forms of organization, 
mainly typified by the term "industrial union- 
ism." To the minds of many of its advocates 
discipline equaled only by a military system 
is prescribed as a distinctive feature, forgetting 
that the workers, even organized, are voluntary 
units with persuasion the only method of se- 
curing obedience. In contradistinction to the 
present diffusion of power and consequent con- 
trol in the local unions the principle of indus- 
trial unionism, as expounded by its ardent ad- 
vocates, would eventually abolish the present 
democratic form of the trade unions and sub- 
stitute in its place an arbitrary autocracy com- 
posed of a few individuals. Many of the pres- 
ent day trades and callings are closely allied, 
and with the constant changing character of 
industry they are being and will be brought 
still closer in identity and unity in the future. 

The adoption of any program to change or- 
ganization methods hastily is invariably met by 
hostility from those affected, and thus a fair 
degree of co-operation can not be secured. 
\yhere two trades or callings overlap in juris- 
diction the members of both frequently cling 
tenaciously to the organization to which, may- 
hap, they have long been affiliated, actuated 
by an unexplainable reverence for it. While 
the clear judgment of those not affiliated to the 
organizations under discussion may be that 
amalgamation would be beneficial, yet this end 
can only be accomplished as the result of per- 
suasive methods, together with self-imposed dis- 
cipline. 

Trade autonomy, according to the ethics of 
the American Federation of Labor, means self- 
government. Craft autonomy does not prohibit 
the amalgamation of kindred or other trades 
or callings. It encourages it. 

In fact, craft autonomy is a guaranty to every 
union that makes common cause through federa- 
tion or otherwise with other unions that its 
rights of self-government are to be protected. 
The position of the American Federation of 
Labor regarding trade-union autonomy was con- 



cretely defined by the Scranton (Pa.) Conven- 
tion of 1901. It was as follows: 

* "Scranton, Pa., December 14, 1901. 
"To the Officers and Delegates to the Twenty- 
first Annual Convention of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor: 

"Greeting — The undersigned, your special 
committee appointed to consider the question of 
the autonomy of the trade unions, beg leave to 
say that it is our judgment the future success, 
permanency, and safety of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, as well as the trade unions 
themselves, depends upon the recognition and 
application of the principle of autonomy, con- 
sistent with the varying phases and transitions 
in industry. 

We realize that it is impossible to define the 
exact line of demarcation where one trade or 
form of labor ends and another begins, and that 
no hard and fast rule can be devised by which 
all our trade unions can be governed or can 
govern themselves. 

"We emphasize the impossibility of the es- 
tablishment of hard and fast lines; but if history 
and experience in the labor movement count for 
aught we urge upon our fellow workmen that 
toleration and forbearance which are proverbial 
of our movement; for, without the recognition 
and application of these qualities any decision 
we may formulate will be futile. We, therefore, 
recommend as follows: 

"1. As the magnificent growth of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor is conceded by all 
students of economic thought to be the re- 
sult of organization on trade lines, and be- 
lieving it neither necessary nor expedient to 
make any radical departure from this funda- 
mental principle, we declare that, as a general 
proposition, the interests of the workers will be 
best conserved by adhering as closely to that 
doctrine as the recent great changes in methods 
of production and employment make practicable. 
However, owing to the isolation of some few 
industries from thickly populated centers where 
the overwhelming number follow one branch 
thereof, and owing to the fact that in some 
industries comparatively few workers are en- 
gaged over whom separate organizations claim 
jurisdiction, we believe that jurisdiction in such 
industries by the paramount organization 
would yield the best results to the workers 
therein, at least until the development of or- 
ganization of each branch has reached a stage 
wherein these may be placed, without material 
injury to all parties in interest, in affiliation 
with their national trade unions. Nothing con- 
tained in this declaration is intended or shall 
be construed to mean a reversal of any decision 
rendered by former Executive Councils or pre- 
vious conventions on questions of jurisdiction. 

"2. We hold that the interests of the trade- 
union movement will be promoted by closely al- 
lied and sub-divided crafts giving consideration 
to amalgamation, and to the organization of 
District and National Trade Councils to which 
should be referred questions in dispute, and 
\yhich should be adjusted within allied crafts' 
lines. 



* The above declaration as here given is as 
corrected by the New Orleans Convention, naee 
143. 



"3. The American Federation of Labor being 
a voluntary association, can not direct and should 
not adopt methods antagonistic to or in conflict 
with established trade union laws, and in order 
to carry the above recommendations into effect, 
and in full recognition of its logical position, 
the American Federation of Labor pledges its 
officers to aid and assist in the adjustment of 
such craft encroachments as disputants may be 
willing to submit to its arbitrament. 

"SAMUEL GOMPERS, 
"JAMES DUNCAN, 
"JOHN MITCHELL, 
"JOHN MULHOLLAND, 
"C. N. HUGHES, 

"Committee." 
In its report to the Rochester Convention of 
1912 the Executive Council, in discussing a pro- 
posed amendment to the Constitution of the 
American Federation of Labor, not only re- 
affirmed the Scranton autonomy declaration, but 
added the following declaration, and an epitome 
of jurisdictional changes that have occurred in 
various trades: 

"In connection with this declaration it is nec- 
essary to call attention to a frequent miscon- 
ception of the term 'autonomy' as it is used 
by the American Federation of Labor. Some 
have mistakenly interpreted it to mean that a 
trade union can not expand its jurisdiction, or 
amalgamate with another organization of the 
same or of a kindred trade in the same in- 
dustry. The term 'autonomy,' as applied, has 
been used as an obstacle to such extension, 
growth, and amalgamation. No such construc- 
tion or interpretation can be justly given the 
term. Broadly and specifically speaking, the 
term 'autonomy' means self-government, as 
automaton and automatic, self-acting; auto- 
biography, self-writing the history of one's own 
life; automobile, self-propelling; deriving its 
general application from the root word auto, 
self. We are prompted to this explanation by 
several instances in which the term 'industrial 
unionism' is applied, as against trade unionism, 
with its autonomous self-government, as well 
as by a circular which was recently issued by 
the Metal Trades Council of Toledo, Ohio, in 
which the affiliated organizations and the dele- 
gates to this convention are urged to favor an 
amendment to the Constitution of the American 
Federation of Labor, so that — 

'"National and Internntional trade unions shall 
have the right to amalgamation; such amalga- 
mation must be endorsed by a referendum vote 
of the organizations affected, and a two-thirds 
affirmative vote of the members voting upon 
such amendment in each organization, shall be 
necessary to make the amendment legal and 
binding.' 

"Such a proposition is based upon the mis- 
conception that the American Federation of 
Labor prevents, or has the power to prevent or 
place obstacles in the way of, amalgamation of 
national or international trade unions wlicn they 
so desire to amalgamate, when as a matter of 
fact every effort has been made by the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor, the Executive Coun- 
cil, and our organizations to bring about amal- 
gamation of national and international unions, 
and where that has been impossible for the time 
(Continued on Pa^e 10.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



DELEGATES' REPORT. 



San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 14, Vn.^. 
To the Sailors" Union of the Pacific : 

Comrades — As your clele<^ates to tlie 
Fourteenth Annual Convention of the Cal- 
ifornia State Federation of Labor, held at 
Fresno, from October 6 to 11, inclusive, 
we herewith sul)mit our report. 

The convention was called to order at 
10 a. m., on October 6, and after listenins? 
to several addresses of welcome proceeded 
with the first business, which was the re- 
port of committee on credentials. There 
were present apjiroximately 200 delegates 
representing more than 32,000 of the or- 
ganized wage workers of California. 

The reports of officers showed that sub- 
stantial progress had been made during 
the past year, the greatest achievements 
being in the legislative field. During the 
past year the membership affiliated with 
the State Federation increased from 62,000 
to 67,000. The Federation has continued 
to give its best efforts toward organizing 
the so-called unskilled or migratory work- 
men, and the recommendation of the State 
organizer to try and have the various local 
unions of laborers in the State come to- 
gether in one union was referred to the 
incoming Executive Council for action. 

It is impossible to deal in detail with 
the v-ery comprehensive report upon labor 
legislation, but attention is called particu- 
larly to the labor records of the California 
Senators and Assemblymen. The vote of 
every legislat(jr upon all important labor 
measures is compiled in detail in this re- 
port, and there is no good reason why 
anyone of those who did not play fair 
with Labor should be returned the second 
time to the State capitol. 

.'\mong the many resolutions adopted the 
following are the more noteworthy : 

Requesting the Industrial Accident Com- 
mission to prepare for introduction at the 
next session of the Legislature a com- 
plete codification of the law relating to 
Employers" Liability and to abolish the 
several defenses of employers which are 
generally understood to have been elim- 
inated by the new Workmen"s Compensa- 
tion law which goes into effect on January 
1, 1914. 

.\ resolution introduced by the delegates 
from the Garment Workers dealing with 
tiie number of union lal)els each delegate 
to future conventions must exhibit upon 
his wearing apparel was adopted, and Cen- 
tral Labor Councils and local unions 
throughout the State are to be requested 
to adopt a similar plan in order to stim- 
ulate the demand for the union label. 

The boycott against the Sperry Flour 
Company levied some time ago by the San 
Joaquin County Labor Council was en- 
dorsed. The firm of P. A. Xewmark & 
Company of Los Angeles, makers of the 
"Merit Shirt," was also placed on the un- 
fair list. 

During the coming year special efforts 
are to be made to organize the sugar 
workers, the teamsters employed on the 
State highway, the janitors, the newspaper 
writers and the clerical workers, and a 
special organizing campaign is to l^e con- 
ducted in Los Angeles. 

The delegates from the Sailors, Fire- 
men, Fishermen, Cooks and Stewards, and 
Steamboatmen, introduced a joint resolu- 



tion re-endorsing the Seamen's bill, and 
urging upon Congress and particularly 
upon the Senators and Representatives 
from California to do their utmost for its 
immediate enactment. This resolution re- 
ceived the unanimous endorsement of the 
convention. 

The bill iiending in Congress known as 
the Metch-Hetchy water supply measure 
for San Francisco received the endorse- 
ment of the convention and telegrams 
were immediately forwarded to the two 
California Senators requesting their as- 
sistance in the furtherance of the bill. 

Endorsement was given to the Initiative 
petition which is now being circulated for 
the pur])ose of placing upon the ballot at 
the general election in 1914 a general 
Eight-Hour law. 

Local unions throughout California are 
urged by resolution to contribute toward 
the defense of the workers arrested as a 
result of the intolerable conditions and the 
subsecpient rebellion in the hop fields at 
Wheatland. 

Iltime Rule in Taxation was re-endorsed 
and a special effort is to be made to carry 
this amendment to the Constitution at 
the general election in 1914. 

Unanimous approval was given to a 
resolution providing that all laborers em- 
|)loyed directly by the State of California, 
or by any contractor engaged in work for 
the State, shall receive not less than $3.00 
per day and that the day"s work shall not 
exceed eight hours. 

A plan was submitted and approved ])ro- 
viding for the amalgamation of the two 
organizations of Steam Shovelmen. 

More adequate compensation for injured 
Navy Yard employes was urged in a reso- 
lution introduced by the delegates from 
the Machinists of Vallejo. 

The .Absent Voters" bill, which passed 
the last Legislature but failed to receive 
the Governor's signature, was re-endorsed 
in princi])le and will be re-submitted in 
similar form at the next Legislature. 

The Light and Power Council strike was 
endorsed and moral and financial support 
was pledged to the strikers in order that 
they may yet win this struggle. 

.\ resolution was adopted declaring un- 
qualified opposition to the election of any 
legislators. State, municipal and otherwise, 
who in any manner assist in lowering the 
white man's social or industrial standards 
of living by emjiloying or giving prefer- 
ence to Asiatics. 

It was decided to draft and introduce a 
bill at the next Legislature prohibiting the 
employment of ])risoners on any public 
work in the State. 

The Recall of State Senator James C. 
Owens was endor.sed, and every effort will 
be made to oust this champion double- 
crosser before the next session of the Leg- 
islature. 

A measure purporting to be a Sunday- 
closing bill for barber shops was defeated, 
because the bill included a great many 
other trades and callings besides barber- 
shops and because it was held that the 
barbers could bring about the Sunday clos- 
ing of barber shops through their organ- 
izations. 

A proposition calling for the endorse- 
ment of an Engineers' License bill was 
again defeated. 

.A proposed amendment to the constitu- 



tion of the Federation which would de- 
prive the larger organizations of most of 
their voting power did not receive a ma- 
jority of the votes, although it would have 
retpiired a two-thirds vote to carry. 

'I'lic incum!)ent officers of the Federation 
were re-elected. Patrick Flynn of the Ma- 
rine Firemen's Union of San Francisco was 
elected as delegate to the Seattle conven- 
ti( n of the .American Federation of Labor, 
and was instructed also to represent the 
Federation at the Western Labor Immi- 
gration Conference, which nieets a few 
days prior to the .A. F. of L. convention. 

Stockton was chosen as the next conven- 
tion city after a very spirited contest be- 
tween that city and Sacramento. 

.Altogether the Fourteenth .Annual Con- 
vention of the organized labor forces of 
California took a long forward step when 
it was unanimously agreed by so-called 
radicals and conservatives alike to join 
hands and fight for the following measures: 

.Abolition of land monopoly. 

Public ownership) of public utilities. 

Knr.ctn-c'it of our twice defeated anti- 
injunction bill. 

Jury trial for contempt of court in labor 
disputes. 

A law enabling absent \-oters to cast 
their ballots. 

A universal eight-hour law. 

Removal of property qualifications for 
jurors. 

Bringing our State-owned university 
nearer to the needs of the working people. 
Fraternally yours, 

E. A. Erickson, 
Arthur S.\yi..\nd, 
Ed. Andersen, 

P.MIL SciIARRKNliKRC. 



NORWEGIAN UNIONS IN 1912. 



The annual report of ihe Trade Union 
.National Center of Norway for the past 
year shows that an increase in member- 
ship of 7,714 has been registered ; the num- 
ber now stands at 60,929; 148,130 kronen 
( 1 krone is 26 cents) have been devoted 
to the financial support of unemployed by 
fourteen central unions ; the remaining 
eleven central unions have not yet intro- 
duced this form of benefit. 

The highest contribution to the unem- 
])loyment fund was paid in the case of the 
Metal Workers l^nion, 74,449 kronen. 

Xext came the wood workers, with 24,- 
686 knonen. 

The third highest was the Printers' 
L'nion, with 13,876 kronen. 

The twelve unions paid out 483,590 
kronen is sick pay altogether; the metal 
workers coming first, with 313,899 kronen ; 
the printers with 68,126. and the wood 
workers with 19,691 kronen; 469,941 
kronen were expended in strike pay and 
lockout support, apart from 46,799 kronen 
spent in connection therewith. 

One hundred and thirty-one thousand 
and forty-three kronen were paid out for 
death allowance, and for disablement ben- 
efit, 12,033 kronen. 

The total expenditure amounted to 1,- 
611,744 kronen, as compared with an in- 
come of 2,002,314. The total funds of the 
trade unions rose from 1.300.000 kronen to 
1.700,000 kronen in the year covered by 
the report. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Modern Don Quixote. 

Governor Foss of Massachusetts has 
delivered himself to the effect that should 
the railroad Brotherhoods employed by 
the New Haven Railroad decide to strike, 
a special session of the Legislature will 
be called for the purpose of enacting 
legislation prohibiting strikes of railway 
employes within the commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. It is difficult to understand 
whether the Governor is in a humorous 
frame of mind or whether he has complete- 
ly lost his equilibrium. The organized 
working people of this country will not 
complacently surrender their inherent 
rights, despite the pronouncements of the 
Governor of Massachusetts. This country 
effectually did away with chattel slavery 
in the '60's, and the State Legislature of 
Massachusetts will hardly coincide with the 
radical views of the present chief execu- 
tive. Perhaps the recent difficulty with 
some of his own employes has so turned 
the Governor's mental balance that he is 
willing to take any kind of action to fur- 
ther the theory held by many employers 
that labor is a commodity and that the em- 
ployer holds in fee simple a title not only 
to inanimate property, but also to the work- 
men whom he employs. The Governor will 
learn that the temper of the people of 
Massachusetts, as well as the balance of 
the country, will not permit the law- 
making body of that State to attempt to 
take away a right which the Constitution 
of the United States gives to its people. 



Win Long Battle. 

After a strenuous contest of eight 
months' duration, the strike of the Photo 
Engravers at Toronto, Ont., Canada, has 
been finally settled on a basis satisfactory 
to the union. During the contest scores of 
mechanics were brought from Great Brit- 
ain by the employers to act as strike break- 
ers. Several of these were deported by the 
government, after determined protest by 
the local union, backed by all organized la- 
bor. A very large per cent, of these im- 
portations, however, upon being informed 
of the real situation deserted their employ- 
ers and became members of the union. 
The Liternational Union of Photo Engrav- 
ers, however, gave splendid assistance to 
the strikers, and during the greater por- 
tion of the time paid to the strikers $14 
per week each. The treasury of the Photo 
Engravers was the one important factor 
in winning this strike, although at the re- 
cent convention of the International Union 
it was determined to establish an up-to-date 
photo engraving establishment in this city. 
and arrangements were in the making for 
installing it. Before this was done, how- 
ever, a settlement was reached. The re- 
sult of this trade movement points to an 
important moral in trade union ethics, and 
that is that high-due unions are able to 
conduct long and serious contests and con- 
vince their employers that it is more 
profitable to treat with the unions of labor 
than to endeavor to crush them. The 
Photo Engravers in this contest have dem- 
onstrated that their fighting proclivities are 



of the best and that the membership and 
officials of the International Union fully 
comprehend the methods necessary to con- 
duct a successful contest. 



Dominion Trades Congress. 

The Trades and Labor Congress of 
Canada, which met in convention at Mon- 
treal recently, showed that a prodigious 
growth in membership and effectiveness 
has been the history of the Congress. 
In the year 1901 the membership totaled 
8381, with receipts of approximately $1000. 
From that time until the convention of 
1913 the record shows an almost con- 
tinuous increase in membership, finances, 
and efficiency. From the small begin- 
ning here noted the membership has 
risen to 80,801, with receipts for the last 
year amounting to $19,871.49, and expendi- 
tures of $10,475.44. The largest balance 
ever in the treasury of the Trades and La- 
bor Congress was reported, being $9,396.05. 
These figures testify to the activity, ability 
and ])ersistence of not only the officers of 
the Congress, but to the local unions at- 
tached to the International movement lo- 
cated in Canada. The slogan of the Con- 
gress now is for the 100,000 mark and in- 
dications are that with the same persist- 
ence and activity displayed in the past this 
goal will be reached during the coming 
year. 



Planning Public Ownership. 

Government ownership of telegraph 
and telephone lines and the extension 
of the parcel post so as to include all 
the functions of the express companies 
will be incorporated in bills to be intro- 
duced in Congress at an early date by 
Congressman Lewis of Maryland. Mr. 
Lewis is acknowledged to be an expert in 
this particular line, and he has been work- 
ing assiduously for months investigating 
government owned telegraph and telephone 
companies abroad. Having marshaled a 
large amount of data, he is framing a 
bill based upon the information which he 
has obtained, embodying a government 
ownership plant. The establishment of 
the parcel post proceeded upon the plan 
of practically confiscating the business of 
the express companies, but only to the 
limit now of carrying packages through the 
mails not exceeding twenty pounds in 
weight. It is a foregone conclusion that 
the time is not far distant when this limit 
will be materially raised. This will fur- 
ther take over the business of the express 
companies. In the matter of the telegraph 
and telephone lines it is probable that an 
effort will be made to purchase the lines 
that are now in operation, but if an at- 
tempt is made to secure a fancy price for 
the present systems of telegraph and tele- 
phone companies the government may de- 
cide to build lines of its own. This will 
be the first effort made in a legislative way 
since- Senator Hill of Colorado, some 
twenty-five years ago, introduced in the 
Senate what was then known as the pos- 
tal telegraph bill. Because of the Sena- 
(Continued on Page 9.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE 'WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs , 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 
Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 
Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B„ Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade IS, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 

Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 

Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 

Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 

Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 

Federacion Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara. 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African .Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, Dur- 
ban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




A great strike of chefs and other 
hotel employes in Barcelona, Spain, 
for a fortnightly rest day was suc- 
cessfully concluded after same had 
run a few days. A law actually 
e.xists which prescribes a weekly 
rest day, but it is nowhere observed. 

One of the most striking effects 
of the recent industrial upheaval on 
the Rand has been the great increase 
in the membership of the various 
trade unions. Men have been join- 
ing in great numbers, and the rail- 
ways, which are State-owned, have 
about 78 per cent, of their daily paid 
employes in one union. 

The glass workers of Great Britain 
have entered upon a general move- 
ment for an increase in wages, the 
forty-four-hour week and the closing 
of the trade to apprentices for the 
nejct four years. The strike is rapid- 
ly spreading. The union has been 
successful in raising the number of 
its membership from 36,399 to 4t>,075. 
Its funds amount to over $75U,000. 

The International Brotherhood of 
Bookbinders is making splendid prog- 
ress in Western Canada. The cam- 
paign now on is being very success- 
ful and reports from Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan, Alberta, are to the 
efifect that large numbers are being 
initiated into all of the unions. Pros- 
pects are that the Bookbinders will 
succeed in pretty thoroughly organ- 
izing that section of Canada. 

The first municipal employment of- 
fice in Denmark is in operation in 
Copenhagen. The Administration 
Board consists of eleven members, 
among which two members arc 
elected by the town councilors, four 
by the Trade Union National Center, 
and four by the employers' organiza- 
tion. The chairman is chosen by 
the magistrate or Mayor. The oflice 
renders its services free and regard- 
less of trade or calling. This office 
does not concern itself with stop- 
pages of work. Twenty-seven thous- 
and, one hundred and ninety-five po- 
sitions were registered by this office 
in 1911. 

According to the Reichsarbeits- 
blatt, the state of the labor market 
in Germany during June was on the 
whole still satisfactory, but there 
was some decline compared with 
May, 1913, and also with June, 1912. 
Returns relating to unemployment 
were furnished to the Imperial La- 
bor Department by 49 trade unions, 
with an aggregate membership of 
2,064,232. Omitting branches which 
failed to make returns, the member- 
ship covered was 2,010,754, of whom 
53,669, or 2.7 per cent., were stated 
to be unemployed at the end of 
June, as against 2.5 per cent, in the 
previous month and 1.7 per cenr. in 
June, 1912. 

Returns received by the British 
Board of Trade from certain selected 
ports in Great Britain (at which 83 
per cent, of the total tonnage in the 
foreign trade is entered and cleared) 
show that during July 55,413 seamen 
of whom 5,403 (or 9.8 per cent.) 
were foreigners, were shipped on 
foreign-going vessels. Compared with 
July, 1912, there was a net increase 
of 1,235 in the total number shipped. 
There were large increases in f^on- 
don and at Liverpool. During the 
seven months ended July, 1913, the 
total number of seamen shipped was 
329,905, an increase of 28,019 on the 
total for the corresponding period 
of 1912. Lascars are not included in 
the figures. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Cannon's Clothing Store 

Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLQTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

S(>«cial Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 



M. BROVS/N 

THE SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE AND OUTFITTER 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

437 RROINT STREET SAIN PEDRO 



S. G. SWANSON 

^Sl BEST '^Ys^^^ TAILORING 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET 

Next door to Postoffice, 
Uos Angeles "Waterfront" 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



INFOR"MATION WANTED. 



Kasper Olsen, a native of Fredrik- 
stad, Norway, age about 25, is in- 
quired for. Address Christ Hansen, 
Port Ludlow, Wash. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

United Hatters of N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN A. MOFFITT, President, Orange, N. J. 
MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary, 11 Waverly Place, Room 15, New York, N. Y. 






WILL BE A MOTHER TO YOU 
Fix your clothes, sew the rips, re- 
pair the tears, fasten the buttons, etc. 
We really clean your clothes by our 

French Dry Cleaning Process 

which is entirely different from the 

mere "sponging and pressing" method. 

W* Call and Deliver 

The French Dye WorKs 

612 BEACON STREET 
SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



San Pedro News Co. 

sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

Dealer! In 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



ALEX. KANE C. A. BRUCE 

WHEN IN SAN PEDRO 

Don't forget the 

GLOBE BOWLING ALLEY AND 

BILLIARD ROOM 

UNDER GLOBE THEATRE, SIXTH ST. 

(Next building west of Sailors' 

Union Hall.) 

KANE & BRUCE, Props. 



This is to certify that on the 27th 
day of February, 1911, one Mathias 
Lag^man, then nineteen years of age, 
was a seaman on board the S. S. 
"Paloma," Cuban flag; that when said 
vessel was lying at anchor in the 
Port of Cabarian, P. R., at about 8 
o'clock in the evening, Lagman, who 
had been working with other men at 
painting, was walking between decks 
in the dark, when he fell through 
hatch No. 4, which had been left un- 
covered. He was picked up in the 
hold and it was found that he was 
paralyzed from the waist down. This 
young man was subsequently taken 
to Russia, where his mother, who is 
very poor, is taking care of him. 

It is believed that the owners were 
negligent in failing to have the hatch 
covered, and in failing to have or 
furnish proper lighting for the 'tween 
decks at the point where Lagman 
fell. If these facts can be proven, 
some relief might be obtained for this 
unfortunate boy. 

The following are the men who 
signed on the articles with Lagman, 
and who had been working with said 
Lagman: 

C. Jones, C. J. Johnson, F. Johan, 
M. Lanhard, E. Randal, W. Paulson. 

Any seaman who will locate these 
men or send their addresses to the 
Legal Aid Society, No. 1 Broadway, 
New York City, will be doing a 
great favor to said sailor, and to 
S. B. Axtell, attorney-in-charge. 

For similar reasons we desire to 
communicate with the following men 
who were members ,of the crew of 
the "Lyman M. Law" in October, 
1911, when Edward S. Tennherg was 
severely injured on the trip between 
Boston and Norfolk: 

Adolph Dittmer, John Olson, Har- 
old Herman, Charles Newberg, James 
J. Kelly. 



We have the best alleys and pool 
tables on the Pacific Coast. 
Light and ventilation perfect. 
Cool and pleasant at all seasons. 



CIGARS TOBACCO SOFT DRINKS 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Charles Edward Latham, native of 
Auckland, N. Z., age 23, last heard 
of at Callao, September, 1911, is in- 
fjuired for by his brother. Address 
] Henry Thomas (No. 550), Sailors' 
Union of the Pacific, San Francisco. 
Cal. 

Adolf Theining, a native of Van- 
nersborg, Sweden, is inquired for by 
his mother. Address, Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Walter Jorgesen Clang, born in 
Aaland Yetta, Ostro Yetta, is in- 
quired for by his uncle, John Clang. 
Address Coast Seamen's Journal. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

Any one knowing the whereabouts 
of Enoch Joseph Horsfold, 18 years 
old, native of New Zealand, please 
communicate with Coast Seamen's 
Journal. 

Johannes Puun. born in Oesel, 
.'Krensburg, Russia, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific coast, is asked 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts ' please notify A. 
Lepp, Sailors' Union, San Francisco. 

Anderson, Bernhard. This man his 
been traced as follows: Fireman on 
Str. San Jose in 1899; oiler on Str. 
Panama in 1900. 



San Pedro Letter List. 

Anderson, Gust Kinnar, K. 

Anderson, W. -1630 Kasliluhn. Krank 

Annell, Albert Larsen, A. B. 

Anderson, Ernst Larsen, Axel, -1768 
Anderson, HemmlndL. Edward 

Anderson, Patrick Lindholm, Erik A. 

Anderson, Soren Lass, John 

Alexandersen, Paul Lovgreen, Otto 

Anderson, O. E., Lauritson, George 

-17G2 Lundberg, Carl 

Ahlstrom, Anders Lindroth, Gustaf 

Andersen, K. P., I^jissen. Johan 

-1717 Leino, G. P. 
Anderson, Ed., -1739Lewls, George 

Anderson, George, Lindeberg, Ernest 

-1812 Lemke, Richard 

Anderson. Mr. Lewet, Frenrhie 

Berndt, Hugo Linderman, Gust 

Behrsin, Jacob Lister, W. 

Bergh, Borge Lolnlng. Herman 

Benson, Helge Mayer, W. 

Berhus, Emil Makinen, Oskar 

Buchtman, F. Maatta, John 

Blakstad, Ed. Moulas, Nick 

Cristensen, H. Merleult. Gaston 

-1366 Miller, John 

Carisson, Aksel Makeie, Gustav W. 

-1220 Moureau, H. 

Carlson, Gust. W. Mayers, P. M. 

Carlson, Gustaf MIkkelsen, Harald 

Collins, E. F. Nelsen, Julius 

Dean. J. Norminen. John E. 

Dreger, Jack Nelson, Hans 

Erdt, Anton Olsen, W. 

Ekholm, F. Olsen, Sckutar 

Eriksson, C. -333 Owen, Fred 

Farrell, Henry Olsen, Marlus 

Flebe, Fritz Olsen, Olav 

Falbom, Richard Ostorbcrg, John 

Grantley. Mr. Pomaret, Leotard 

Gusek, Bernhard Pedersen, A., -1564 

Hunt, Gust. Petersen, Aage 

Halvorsen, H., 2229 Peterson, Tom 

Hansen, Nils, -989 Pedersen. Peder 

Hannus, Alex Phillips, K. 

Hiiknnsson, Axel Pekman, Ernest 

Hanson, Peler Repson. E. 

Hjorth, Knul Kantman, Robert 

Hausinan, Mr. Rudowitz, H. 

Hansen, C. Rignoll, J. V. 

Hass, James Saariiio, Hemming 

Hansen, Herald Schroeder, Ernst 

Hansen, Johannes Stephan. M. 

Helenius. Oskar Sanders, Charles 

Hintza, Yrjo Spieler, Albert 

Iversen, Ivar Siovers. Herman 

.lensen, Jens B. Schonke, Frank 

Johnson, George Sievers, G. P. 

Joigensen, Jorgen Thorsen, Joe 

Jones, Eddie Torgersen, .\nton 

Johnson, Gunnar Tliomsen, Th. 

Johnson. H., -221.'? Waaland, Lewis 

Johansen, Halvard Wilson, A. 

Jorgensen, Fred Warkala, J. 

Jensen, Jens B. Zorning, Arthur 
Johansson, Fritz W. Packages and 

Jonasson, O. M. Photos. 

Johansen, Walter Larsen, James Chr. 

Kramer, Otto Nordman, John 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Albrect, Chas. 
Andersen, W. 
Andersen, M. C. 
Andowety, H. 
Anderson, E. 
Anderson, C. E. 
Anderson, E. K. 
Anderson, A. 
Berthele, M. 
Baker, M. 
Bode, W. 
Carlson, C. 
Carlson, A. 
Christensen, A. 
Clausen, J. 
Colbert, M. J. 
Douglas, G. A. 
Edgeston, C. J. 
Ehlert, An. 
Eaton, Neva I. 
Glaaormither, C. 
Gordon, James 
Hansen, Pet. 
Haralsen, W. 
Hanson, Jorg. 
Hansen, Christ. 
Haven, Francis 
Hevaroso, H. B. 
Hapstad, Sigurd 
Irwin, Robert 
Ivans, Carl 
Trike, Willie 
Jensen, Hans 



Karlson, H.ins 
Karlsen, Oskar 
Kjassgaard. Hans 
Langer, Robert 
Laymbrag, H. 
Llntianen. Ernest 
Lindberg, T. 
Ludwigsen, Arne 
Marx, Albert 
Machado, H. 
Mafo, E. S. 
Methenen, E. K. 
Olander, Carl 
Olsen, J. H. 
Person, Edmond 
Pitschkun, W. 
Pelusan, D. E. 
Russell, W. 
Reinink, H. 
Rasmundsen. G. 
Silhus, W. 
Slan, C. 
Schift, Ch. 
Sorensen, E. 
Suvert. H. 
Sjablom, G. 
Stenars, A. W. 
Salversen, S. 
Sohates, A. 
Vilvot. J. 
Williamson, R. A. 
Zornow, Herbert 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

William Moran, who left Buffalo 
forty-two years ago, at the age of 
12 years, is inquired for by his 
sister. Address Mrs. Catherine Mo- 
ran Fossett, 421 Normal avenue, Buf- 
falo, N. Y. 

Albert Christensen, native of By- 
rum Laso, last heard of in San Fran- 
cisco in 1910, is inquired for by his 
brother. Address, H. C. Christensen, 
Scandinavian Sailors' Home, San 
Francisco. 

Albert Smith, a native of Cork, Ire- 
land, who left the American ship 
John C. Meyer, on Feb. 20, 1911, 
is very anxiously inquired for by 
his wife. Please notify British Con- 
sul General at San Francisco. 

Fred (Albin) Swanson, a native of 
Malmo, Sweden, aged about 25, is 
inquired for. Address, Coast Sea- 
men's Journal 

Nils Johnson, who was wrecked 
in the American bark Oasis, Sept. 2, 
1887, is inquired for by W. F. Ho- 
henschild, Berkeley, Cal. 



¥ 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The steamer "Northland" lost a part of her 
deckload of lumber on October 12. The vessel 
had passed out of the river from Astoria, when 
a heavy sea struck her and carried away many 
feet of her lumber cargo. No other damage was 
sustained. 

Further additions to the list of ten wireless 
stations along the British Columbia Coast are 
expected as a result of the visit of E. P. 
Edwards, Dominion superintendent of wireless 
stations, and E. J. Haughton, district super- 
intendent, who have just completed a tour of in- 
spection. They found the most serious need on 
the west coast of the Queen Charlotte Islands. 

The steam schooner "Merced" drove ashore 
near Point Gorda, Cal., on October 15, and 
is reported to be a total loss. Captain A. F. 
Asplund and his crew, who stood by the wrecked 
vessel for some time, were finally compelled 
to abandon her as the sea began to make a 
clean sweep of the steamer. The "Merced" 
was built only a year ago at Astoria, Or., and 
is owned by the Charles R. McCormick & Co. 
of San Francisco. 

Captain Ballinger, commander of the United 
States revenue cutter "Bear," which is at Nome, 
Alaska, giving relief to the storm and flood vic- 
tims, informed the citizens' relief committee at 
a conference that he would advise his depart- 
ment at Washington that additional assistance 
was urgently needed. At the meeting it was 
shown that 500 or more people, including many 
women and children, are destitute with no 
shelter for the winttr. 

One of those freakish typographical errors 
which creep into the news columns occasionally 
was recorded in this column last week. It was 
stated that the new observatory at Tahiti would 
be located in lat. 70 deg. S. and longitude 153 
deg. W. of Greenwich. Inasmuch as the resi- 
dents of Tahiti will probably object to have 
their island removed to the Antarctic region 
we hasten to correct the error by changing the 
70 to 17. 

Repairs to the oil steamer "Washtenaw" and 
the barge "Simla" of the Union Oil Company, 
which struck near Point Gorda in a fog re- 
cently, will cost over $100,000. The "Simla" 
was damaged to the extent of nearly $80,000, 
while the job on the "Washtenaw" will cost 
in the neighborhood of $40,000. The "Simla" 
had only made a few trips at the time of the 
mishap. She was converted into an oil carrier 
at heavy expense, which made the accident par- 
ticularly unfortunate for the company. 

The Pacific island of Nauru has now an ef- 
ficient wireless apparatus in operation, and mes- 
sages are being sent to Yap (Caroline Islands) 
for transmission by cable to all parts of the 
world. Nauru Island and Ocean Island export 
very large quantities of phosphate annually, and 
it is expected that Ocean Island will also have 
a high-power wireless installation before long. 
In the meantime, however, it is possible for 
vessels loaded at Ocean Island to call at Nauru 
and report to their owners if desired. 

Shattering all prior women's records for the 
perilous swim across the waters of the Golden 
Gate, twelve-year-old Myrtle Wright distin- 
guished herself on October 12 by accomplishing 
a feat which more than once has defeated the 
efforts of stronger and more hardy swimmers. 
Just thirty-five minutes and forty seconds after 
entering the water the child touched the bar- 
ren rocks of Lime Point on the Marin County 
shore. Mrs. Myrtle Wright, her mother, made 
an even better record, covering the distance in 
thirty-three minutes flat. 

It is reported that the Alaska Pacific Steam- 
ship Company has concluded the negotiations for 
the purchase of two Atlantic steamships, the 
".\dmiral Dewey," and "Admiral Schley," both 
of which it is asserted, will soon be brought 
around to the Pacific Coast and used in the 
trade between Seattle and California ports. It 
is supposed that after the arrival of the two 
Admirals on the Pacific Coast they will be 
placed on the San Francisco run, and the steam- 
ships "Watson" and "Buckman" placed in the 
Alaska trade. 

The Department of Commerce has remitted 
the fine of $500 imposed upon Captain C. J. 
Fosen of the freight steamship "Melville Dollar" 
for carrying fourteen passengers while in Alas- 
kan waters without a certificate of passenger 
inspection. Captain Fosen had been informed 
by the Commission at Bethel, Alaska, that four- 
teen white persons, including two women and 
one child, were stranded in the town, where 
they would have to remain unless transported 
to St. Michael by the "Melville Dollar." Two 
of the fourteen were ill and one needed a sur- 
gical operation immediately. Under these cir- 
cumstances Captain Fosen consented to take the 
passengers, receiving $20 each from eleven of 
the party. 

Captain Andrew Welding, who recently pur- 
chased the revenue-cutter "Rush," will convert 
the famous old craft into a fishing steamer. The 
"Rush" will be the second United States 
revenlie-cutter to enter the halibut trade. The 
"Grant," after many years of service for the 



Government, was sold some years ago. She 
was lost in Alaskan waters two years ago. The 
"Rush," which formerly wintered at San Fran- 
cisco, was sold at public auction a year ago 
for $8500 and it is understood that Captain 
Welding paid $11,000 for the vessel when he 
bought her from the Alaska Junk Company. 
The "Rush" is a wooden vessel of 701 tons 
displacement, 175 feet long, 26 feet beam and 
15 feet deep. She was built at Port Blakeley 
in 1885. 

The naval graving dock at Pearl Harbor, 
Hawaii, which recently collapsed, can be saved 
and finished according to the original design, 
in the opinion of Alfred Noble, a civilian en- 
gineer detailed to inspect it. Mr. Noble will 
submit a detailed report with plans for com- 
pletion of the work on its present site. To 
secure adequate foundations, however, it will be 
necessary to extend the dock 150 feet inland 
beyond the present site, moving the entrance 
also inward to that extent. The report will 
bring to an issue the conflicting claims between 
the Government and the contractors building the 
dock. The latter have insisted, since the up- 
heaval of the bottom, that no dock can be built 
on this site, which contention, if sustained, 
would relieve them of their contract. 

The Russian flagship "Taymyr" and its con- 
sort, the "Waygatch," constituting a Russian 
Polar expedition under Commander Wilkitzky, 
which left Vladivostok June 10 of this year, 
reached St. Michael, Alaska, stormbound Octo- 
ber 9, and brought to that port news of the 
discovery, north of Siberia, in latitude 81 north, 
longitude 104 east, of a new uninhabited moun- 
tainous land, possibly a continent. The expe- 
dition landed with difficulty on the new land, 
raising the Russian flag on it, and took posses- 
sion in the name of the Czar. Commander 
Wilkitzky christened the new land "Nicholas 
Second Land." The expedition sailed from 
Vladivostok by way of Petropovlosk and East 
Cape, and thence westward along the Siberian 
coast. 

The "Star of Lapland," Captain Rasmussen, 
of the Alaska Packers' Association, last of the 
big salmon fleet to return home from the north- 
ern canneries, arrived at San Francisco on 
October 10. She made the passage down from 
Loring in seven days. In addition to having 
the distinction of being the last of the fleet to 
return, the "Star of Lapland" is said to have 
brought the largest single cargo of canned sal- 
mon received this season. Her consignment 
amounted to 138,567 cases. The salmon season 
just closed is said to be better than that of last 
year, which was called a record pack. At all 
the canneries in Oregon, British Columbia and 
on the shores of Bering Sea a beehive of 
industry prevailed. The season was a particu- 
larly quiet one, no serious disturliances or mis- 
haps being reported. 

Captain Owen Williams, master of the British 
ship Glenesslin, wrecked on the rocky coast of 
Tillamook County, Oregon, October 1, was de- 
clared guilty of negligence, following an investi- 
gation of the wreck by the British Consulate 
at Portland, and his master's certificate was 
suspended for three months. First-mate L. W. 
Howard was reprimanded for not acting prompt- 
ly when the ship found herself in a dangerous 
position, and Second-mate John K. Colefield's 
certificate was suspended for six months for 
great negligence in going too close inshore 
and not calling the captain sooner. The inquiry 
was held by British Consul Thomas Erskine, 
assisted by Captain H. C. Davison of the British 
ship "Lord Templeton" and Captain Ernest Dal- 
ton of the British ship "Border Knight." The 
"Glenesslin" went on the rocks with all sails set, 
and was so badly wrecked that the hulk was 
sold for $560 where it lay. 

According to advices brought by the "Nippon 
Maru," there is a rumor current in Japan to the 
efifect that an amalgamation between the Toyo 
Kisen Kaisha, which operates to this port, and 
the Nippon Yusen Kaisha, supplying an Oriental 
service to the Sound, is contemplated. The 
rumor, which came from well-informed quarters, 
indicates that the amalgamation will be brought 
about by the Tapanese government in connection 
with a revision of shipping subsidies. The Jap- 
anese government, according to the report, is 
prepared^ to advise the grant of an annual sub- 
vention in support of new services to the At- 
lantic coast of North and South America when 
the Panama Canal is open for commerce. As 
the result, however, of financial stringencies it 
is necessary to efifect economies, and the com- 
bine in question has been suggested as the best 
way out of the difficulty. The present lines be- 
tween the Orient 'and the Pacific Coast are main- 
tained by the Toyo Kisen Kaisha, the Nippon 
Yusen Kaisha and the Osaka Shosen Kaisha. 



F._ R. WALL, who was for many years an ofl^- 
cer in the United States Navy, is now practicing 
marine law in San Francisco. He gives claims 
of all seafarers careful attention. 324 Merchants' 
Exchange Bldg., Third Floor, California St., 
near Montgomery. Telephone, Kearny 394; 

(Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America. 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' FED- 
ERATION. 
THOS. A. HANSON, 
570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 
AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
1%A Lewis St., Boston, Mass. 

Branches: 
NEW YORK CITY, 40 South St. 
NEW ORLE.A.NS, La., 1054 Magazine St. 

MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC COAST. 



Telephone 1879 
Telephone 5153 



Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 4 South St 

Broad. Night Call 8374 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St 

Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 53 St. Ann SL 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 4 Contl St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 



CHICAGO, n. 



Headquarters: 
570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 



BUFFALO, N. T.. 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR. O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th SL 
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. T., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O.. 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich.. 7 Woodbrldge St., East. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St 
BAT CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. T., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, III., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water SL 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters:. 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St., Tel. Seneca 2295. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 West Ninth St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed SL 
CHICAGO, 111., 406 N. Clark St. 
ASHTABULA, O., 74 Bridge SL 
TOLEDO, O., 54 Main SL 
DETROIT, Mich., 7 East Woodbrldge St 
PT. HURON, Mich., 517 Water SL 
CONNEAUT, O., 922 Day St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella SL 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third SL 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third SL 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 

SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 84 Embarcadero. 
Branches: 

VICTORIA. B. C, Old Court Rooms, Bastion 
Square. 

VANCOUVER, B. C. Labor Temple, Cor. Homer 

^"^a^m"»?T"'^V ^C °i„^.°^ ^^^5. Tel. Seymour 8703. 

TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North SOth SL 

SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St, P. O. Box 65. 

ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 

PORTLAND. Ore., 51 Union Ave., Box 21P0. 

EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 

SAN -PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 

HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts.. 
P. O. Box 314. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 91 Steuart St. 
Branches: 

•SEATTLE, Wasli., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
((75. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 101 N. Front St 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 123 Fifth St., P. O. Box 674. 
(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBUSHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 1 Six months . - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To in.sure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
84 Embarcadero, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22. 1913. 



INSPECTING THE "COXGRESS." 



Thursday of last week was "visitors' 
day" on the new steamer "Congress," re- 
cently completed at Philadelphia for the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company and 
now engaged in the Pacific coastwise trade. 

According to the reports in the daily 
press nearly three thousand persons were 
received and entertained on the "Congress." 
The entertainment of the great throng is 
said to have taxed the steward's depart- 
ment, but every visitor was treated to a 
"dainty" lunch served in the dining saloon. 

Detailed description of the "unique" di- 
ning saloon were given by all newspapers. 
Here is a sample : 

The dining saloon is airy and spacious and 
only four persons are seated at each table. The 
seating arrangement, which includes a drop seat 
for two on each side of the table, gives privacy 
to each group of diners. The saloon is fur- 
nished in white and gold, with mahogany fit- 
tings. More than 200 persons can be served 
simultaneously. An orchestra played. Etc., etc. 

The editor of this sheet did not receive 
an invitation to the reception, but he in- 
vited himself to a private overhauling of 
the "mammoth coaster" a day in advance 
of the public reception. The editor mar- 
veled at the elegance of the passengers' 
(|uarters and the taste displayed in the se- 
lection of the various styles of finishings, 
and after feasting his eyes in viewing these 
royal accommodations he betook himself to 
those much less advertised places desig- 
nated as the sleeping and eating quarters 
for the sailors and firemen and the person- 
nel of the steward's department. Before 
the "Congress's" arrival on the Coast it 
had been stated that in this vessel the 
crew's accommodations would be a model 
in every respect. Therefore, much was ex- 
pected — and it was perhaps due to these 
unreasonably fond expectations that the 
disappointment was rather severe. A visit 
to the firemen's quarters revealed the un- 
pleasant fact that it was right above a very 
warm part of the ship. So warm, indeed, 
that a pair of shoes left on deck for a short 
period would double up like a worm on a 



hot stove. Further, we were told by one 
who knew, because he had been in the 
"Congress" on her maiden trip from the 
east coast, that if there is any kind of 
breeze and a modest sea running, the bull's- 
eyes would have to be closed, and as there 
is no other ventilation, the normal temper- 
ature during those periods comes danger- 
ously near to that prevailing in a Turkish 
bath. 

It must be said to the credit of the com- 
])any that separate shower baths have been 
provided for sailors and firemen, but the 
latter's shower is located in a rather pecu- 
liar position to say the least. It is quite 
certain, at any rate, that none of the 3,000 
visitors who partook of the sumptuous 
luncheon ventured up that ladder which 
leads to the firemen's shower. 

The sailors' quarters are more roomy and 
airy than those on most steamers on the 
Coast, but there is no fancy mahogany fin- 
ish on the ship's sides in the forecastle. It 
is just the plain cold steel with a coat of 
paint. 

Separate rooms are provided for the four 
quartermasters and the four deck boys. In 
each of these two rooms the ventilation is 
confined to one bull's-eye and there is no 
locker or space for clothing or other things 
— just four bunks, that's all. 

There are separate mess rooms for sailors 
and firemen ; these rooms are not what we 
had hoped for, but they are at least a step 
in the right direction. 

It is to be hoped that the defects in the 
crew's quarters herein referred to will be 
remedied as far as possible at an early 
date. And we do sincerely trust that in 
the building of the next steamer for the 
Pacific Coast Steamship Company all 
grounds for just criticism from this quarter 
will be entirely eliminated. The manage- 
ment of that company has at least made an 
effort to improve upon the utterly disgrace- 
ful accommodations provided for the crews 
in most steam vessels, and we would rather 
commenfl than criticize — whenever and 
wherever it is i)ossible to do so. 



.\()w that the "\'olturno" incident has 
become a thing of the past — another chap- 
ter in the bulky volume of disasters at sea 
— we may look forward to another investi- 
gation by Government experts and others 
representative of the "shipping interests." 
In view of the fact that in this instance 
all known life-saving facilities seem to have 
been available and utilized to the fullest 
extent, we are curious to know who or 
what agency will be blamed for the loss 
of lives. One thing is certain, the "ship- 
ping interests" will never admit that an 
unskilled and inefificient crew could be a 
contributory factor in any wreck and dis- 
aster. If they did they would probably 
soon be compelled to carry competent and 
efficient men, and that would mean quite 
an extra item in the running expense. 
'I'hey can not shoulder the responsibility 
ii])nn the equipment; they will not blame 
an inefficient crew — so what are they to do? 
Blame the wind and the sea, see! 



THE P.AXAMA CANAL. 



The history of the labor movement will 
repeat its successes oftener and its failures 
seldomer whenever the laborer learns to 
accept experience as a gift from the past 
instead of insisting upon purchasing it 
with his own good coin. 



\\ ith the explosion on the afternoon of 
October 10th of eight tons of dynamite 
under the Gamboa dike, the dream of cen- 
turies became a reality. 

It is doubtful if a more momentous tele- 
gram was ever sent than that which went 
from the \\'hite House from the tip of Pres- 
ident Wilson's finger and destroyed the 
last remaining obstacle to the transit from 
sea to sea at Panama. In four seconds 
an electric spark raced 4000 miles — to Gal- 
veston, across the Gulf, over the Isthmus 
of Tehuantepec, then LSOO miles more under 
the sea along the Central American coast, 
to the spot where it wrought the culmi- 
nating beneficent devastation and fulfilled 
the dream of four centuries. 

Now that the great task has been almost 
completed, it is particularly appropriate to 
call attention to the fact that for about two 
years following the final assumption by the 
United States of the work of constructing 
a canal across the Isthmus of Panama, 
scarcely a stroke of work was performed 
upon the main undertaking. It was a 
period of preparation for an herculean en- 
terprise, and millions were poured into the 
Canal Zone without producing any results 
apparent to the casual observer. Yet it 
was during this period that the foundations 
of the tremendous task now approaching 
completion were laid. So far as knowledge 
extends, no previous enterprise approaching 
this in magnitude had been entered upon 
with the same regard for the welfare of 
those engaged upon it. That something 
like $20,000,000 should be expended on the 
isthmus before the real work of construc- 
tion was well advanced, in order to make 
conditions not only tolerable but fairly 
comfortable for its force of 40,000 workers 
and for the other thousands employed in 
providing service for this force, looked at 
the time to many as if altruism rather than 
twentieth century business methods was to 
prevail in the zone. The events of the 
succeeding years proved, however, that 
there was little dreaming but eminently 
sane planning of very much practical work 
during those two preliminary years. 

Every .American must feel pride in the 
achievement. Less than ten years ago the 
French administration left us a legacy of 
failure and despair and tragedy. It was 
freely prophesied that the task was beyond 
human compassing. It proved too much 
for the two able men who preceded Goe- 
thals as chief engineer. Some of those 
who had been engaged in the work for 
years uttered their forebodings of the en- 
tire collapse of the project, and resigned. 
But most of the brave army of occupation 
persevered. They now have the reward of 
their faith in the visible triumph. The 
croakers and false prophets are silenced. 
None can deprive the host of toilers of 
the honor that is their due for the most 
significant alteration in the atlases of the 
globe that has ever been made by the 
hand of man. 

To the people of the Pacific Slope this 
event must be accepted as the final signal 
for a concerted effort in preparing for the 
change that is bound to come with an im- 
migration suddenly diverted to these shores. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



PETROLEUM DISPLACES COAL. 



On account of the large production of 
petroleum in California and its use for 
fuel, coal mining has practically ceased in 
that State, the production in the last two 
years being only 10,747 tons in 1911 and 
10,978 tons in 1912, according to Edward 
W. Parker, of the United States Geological 
Survey. 

The pr(;duction f)f petroleum in Califor- 
nia in 1912 was 86,450,767 barrels, of which 
not less than 50,000,000 barrels was used 
directly for fuel. Large quantities of oil 
are also used in place of coal for gas 
making, and on the estimate that 3' 2 bar- 
rels of petroleum is equivalent to 1 ton 
of ordinary bituminous coal, it is probable 
that from 1.400,000 to 1,500,000 tons of coal 
would be required to perform in California 
the service now rendered by petroleum in 
the production of heat, light and power. 
California oil is the principal fuel for loco- 
motives as far north as Washington and 
across the Sierra and the Cascade Range, 
its freedom from sparks serving as a great 
protection against forest fires, as compared 
with coal or wood fuel. It is used almost 
exclusively on inland and coastwise steam- 
ers and to an increasing extent by the 
transpacific steamers. It has even dis- 
placed coal on Puget Sound, many of the 
steamers of the Canadian Pacific fleet inly- 
ing between Vancouver, Victoria, and 
other points having been equipped for oil 
burning. There is still, however, some de- 
mand for coal in California, particularly for 
domestic use and for bunker trade at San 
Francisco, but it is almost exclusively sup- 
plied by coals from other States and from 
abroad. 

There are, howe\'er. in California a num- 
ber of small, widely separated coal fields, 
chief among which are the Mount Diablo 
field of Contra Costa County, the Corral 
Hollow field of Alameda County, the 
Priest Valley and Trafton fields of San 
Benito County, and the Stone Canyon field 
of Monterey County. The first two, which 
are on the eastern border of San Francisco 
Bay and consequently in the west-central 
part of the State, ])roduce black lignite or 
sub-bituminous coal. The coals in Mon- 
terey County are of the same geologic age 
as those farther north, I)ut they have been 
altered into true bituminous coals. The 
alteration in the San Benito Countv areas 
has not progressed so far as in Monterey 
County, but the coals closely approach the 
bituminous grade. None of them possesses 
coking f|ualities. 



THE "VOLTURNO" DISASTER. 



The "Volturno" disaster indicates need 
of much greater protection against fire on 
all passenger ships. 

All such vessels should ha\'e a proper 
c(|uipment of ]-)owerful ])um])s of large ca- 
pacity, ccMinected with a system of perfo- 
rated pipes in the hold and all other parts 
of the hull in which fire could break out. 
Also a pipe system for the discharge of car- 
bonic acid gas to stifle fire in places where 
water can not be used with advantage. 

The i)r()blem of safety from fire at sea 
would seem to be one of expense simply, 
save in the case of highly inflammable or 



explosive cargoes, which never should be 
carried on passenger ships. 

Sea water is far superior to fresh water 
for fire-fighting purposes, which is one 
great advantage a ship's crew has compared 
with firemen on shore. 

Usually shipowners are far more con- 
cerned about profit than for safety. They 
rely more upon insurance than on precau- 
tions against fire or wrecking from any 
cause. Even on the greatest and the most 
costly liners there is more or less sacrifice 
of safety to comfort, luxury and speed. 
And often the ofificers are greatly over- 
worked, so as to be unable to exercise all 
the vigilance and alertness required by their 
responsible duties. — Sacramento Bee. 



PANAMA CANAL FACTS. 



Estimated cost, $375,000,000. 

Length, forty-two and a 'half miles. 

Dirt excayated, 242,000,000 cubic yards. 

Channel, 300 to 1000 feet wide; from 41 
to 61') feet deej). 

Locks, 1100 feet long and 110 feet wide, 
usable. 

Summit, eighty-five feet above sea level. 

Passage will require ten to twelve hours. 

Isthmian Canal Commission, chairman 
and chief engineer, Colonel George W . Goe- 
thals. 

Engineers, Colonels H. F. Hodges and 
II. II. Rousseau, Lieutenant-Colonel D. D. 
Gaillard, Lieutenant-Colonel William L. 
Sibert. 

Sanitary Officer, Colonel W. C. Gorgas. 

Civil administrator. Maurice H. Thatcher. 

Gatmi dam — Length along crest, 8000 
feet, including spillway; greatest width, 
2100 feet; crest of dam, 115 feet above sea 
level, leaving a thirty-foot margin above 
the normal height of canal ; crest, 100 feet 
wide ; concrete in Gatun locks, 20,000,000 
cubic yards. 

Cost includes $20,053,000 for sanitation, 
$7,382,000 for civil administration and $50,- 
000,000 paid to the new French Canal Com- 
pany and to the Republic of Panama for 
property and franchises. - 

Earlier attempts to build — Spain author- 
ized canal in 1814. United States Govern- 
ment makes first survey of possibilities in 
1824, but does not act ; .Accessory Transit 
Company, an .American concern, began 
operation of railroad in 1852, but did not 
use its canal franchise. 

.Actual construction of canal began in 
1882 by French company of speculators and 
])iomoters, headed by Count Ferdinand de 
Lesseps, builder of Suez Canal. Wild finan- 
ciering and inefficiency and extravagance 
put the company into hands of a receiver 
in 1889. Lender receiver's direction a new 
company was formed in 1893; it was offered 
$40,000,000 for canal rights. Deal with 
America concluded after Panama-Ignited 
States treaty in 1904. Work on present 
canal began May 4, 1904. 



Though the latest official report on the 
census of .Scotland shows that the population 
is fully one million greater than in 1881, 
there is a decline in the number of Gaelic 
speakers. The enumeration of Gaelic-sjieak- 
ing persons in Scotland was first instituted 
in the census of 1881. The census now under 
review gives the number at 202,398, as against 
230,806 in 1901. Speakers of Gaelic alone 
numbered 28,107 in 1901. 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Gal., Oct. 13, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 
7:30 p. ni., John W. Ericksen presiding. Sec- 
retary reported shipping slack, with lots of men 
ashore. It was decided that the regular weekly- 
meeting at San Francisco shall hereafter begin 
at 7 o'clock p. m., instead of 7:30 p. m., which 
has been the custom in the past. 
Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 20, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
o'clock p. m., E. Stein presiding. Secretary 
reported situation unchanged. Shipwreck Ben- 
efit was awarded to seven members of the crew 
of the steam-schooner Merced. A donation of 
$100 was made toward the defense of the men 
in jail owing to the Wheatland riots. Ofificers 
were nominated for the ensuing term. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

84 Embarcadero. Phone Kearny 2228. 

Victoria, B. C, Oct. 13, 1913. 
Shipping dull, with few men ashore. 

ARCHIE KING, Agent. 
Old Court Rooms, Bastion Square. 



Vancouver, B. G., Oct. 13, 1913. 
-Shipping quiet; prospects uncertain. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
N. E. corner of Hastings and Main streets. 
P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma .Agency, Oct. 13, 1913. 
Prospects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 13, 1913. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



.\herdeen .Agency. Oct. 13, 1913. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland .Agency, Oct. 13, 1913. 
Shipping slack. 

G. A. SVENSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 2100. 51 Union Ave. Tel. East 
4912. 



Eureka .Agency, Oct. 10, 1913. 
No meeting; shipping slack. 

JOHN ANDERSEN. Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 14, 1913. 
Shipping dull. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
I28'/2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 4, 1913. 
and i^rospects poor. 

JACK EnWARDSEN, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



Shippint 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headc|uarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 16, 1913. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m.. Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported situation unchanged. $100 was donated 
to the striking miners in Calumet, Mich. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle .Agency, Oct. 9, 1913. 
No meeting. .Shipping fair. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER. Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203-205. Phone 
Main 2233. P. O. Box 214. 



San Pedro Agency, October 9, 1913. 
Shipping improving. Nominated delegates to 
the International Convention. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 

Portland Agency, October 8, 1913. 
No meeting: shipping improving: prospects 
medium. 

THOMAS BAKER. Agent. 
New Grand Central Hotel, Room 108, Third 
and Flanders Sts. Phone Main 1528. 



.Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 8, 1913, 
Sliip[)ing quiet: nearly all sailing vessels laying 



up. 

1'. O. Box 6. 



JACK ROSEN. Agent. 



DIED. 

\\ illlani lingljcrLJ-. No. 786. a native of .Sweden, 
auo 38. Died ,it Seattle. Wash., Oct. 11. 1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



CONSIDERATION OF SEAMEN'S BILL 



During the past week beginning with 
Thursday, Oct. 16, the Senate of the Uni- 
ted States has given consideration of the 
Seamen's bill. Before it was agreed to 
give consideration to the Seamen's bill 
a discussion took place in the Senate upon 
the advisability to postpone action until 
the regular session in December. Fol- 
lowing are the remarks of the Senators 
who participated in the preliminary dis- 
cussion, as printed in the Congressional 
Record of October 9: 

The Merchant Marine. 

The Vice-President— The hour of 2 o'clock 
having arrived, it becomes the duty of the Chair 
to lay before the Senate the unfinished business, 
which is Senate bill 136. 

The Senate, as in Committee of the Whole, 
proceeded to consider the bill (S. 136) to pro- 
mote the welfare of .American seamen in the 
merchant marine of the United States, to abol- 
ish arrest and imprisonment as a penalty for 
desertion, and to secure the abrogation of treaty 
provisions in relation thereto, and to promote 
safety at sea. 

Mr. La Follette— Mr. President, it is not my 
purpose to press the bill for consideration at 
to-day's session. After I make a request and 
ask to have some printing done, I will ask to 
have it temporarily laid aside. 

Before that, however, Mr. President, I should 
like to say that I do not press the bill for 
consideration to-day because I am advised that 
some members of the committee, among others 
the chairman of the committee, are absent from 
the city and that many of them are not advised 
that Senate bill 136 has been made the un- 
finished business. I wish to give an opportunity 
for the members of the committee and all mem- 
bers of the Senate who are interested in this 
legislation, and who desire to be present, to be 
here when it is considered. 

I understand that the Senate has already 
agreed that when it adjourns to-day it will meet 
on Monday. 

Mr. Kern — Yes. 

Mr. I, a Follette — To-day is Thursday. I think 
perhaps if the notice were given to-day that 
the bill would be taken up next Monday it 
would give opportunity for Senators who arc 
absent to be .here. 

Mr. Vardaman — Mr. President 

The Vice-President — Does the Senator from 
Wisconsin yield to the Senator from Missis- 
sippi? 

Mr. T,a Follette — Certainly. 

Mr. Vardaman — I wish to suggest to the Sen- 
ator from Wisconsin, as I said personally to 
him on the floor, that when this bill was re- 
ported by the committee it was understood by 
some members of the committee that it was 
not to be considered at this session. I agree 
with the Senator from Wisconsin that some 
legislation is very much needed, and I join 
with him in his desire that the matter shall be 
pressed at the earliest possible moment. I 
think, however, that next Monday would hardly 
give the Senators who are interested in the 
measure time to return. One of them I know 
has been here since the convening of Congress 
last year and he has a little private business 
at home that he is now attending to. I wish to 
sug'gest to the Senator from Wisconsin that 
it might be better to fix the time, say, next 
Wednesday. 

Mr. La Follette — I had some discussion per- 
sonally with members of the committee who 
were present on the floor during the session this 
morning — the Senator from Mississippi, among 
others — and also with the senior Senator from 
Florida (Mr. Fletcher), who reported the bill 
and who gave me information that makes just 
a slight correction in the statement of the 
Senator from Mississippi as to the understand- 
ing of the committee. I see the Senator from 
Florida is now on the floor. I was about to 
say that I understood from the Senator from 
Florida that the understanding when the bill 
was reported from the committee was that, so 
far as the wishes or views of the members 
of the committee were concerned, they preferred 
that the bill should not be considered at this 
session, but that the question of consideration 
was a matter which the Senate would have to 
determine. Do I state that correctly, I inquire 
of the Senator from Florida? 

Mr. Fletcher — T think that is quite correct. 
Mr. La Follette — I am certainly desirous that 
that all Senators who would care to participate 
in the discussion should have the opportunity 
to be present. Perhaps we might right at 
this time agree that the bill should be taken 
up on Wednesday of next week and its con- 
sideration continued from day to day until, say, 
Saturday of next week at 4 o'clock, when 
we might vote upon it. 

Mr. Vardaman — Mr. President, the purpose of 
my suggestion to the Senator from Wisconsin 
was that especially two Senators, the Senators 
from Arkansas (Mr. Clarke), the chairman of 
the Committee on Commerce, and the Senator 



from Ohio (Mr. Burton), might be permitted 
to finish up their private affairs at their homes 
and be here by that time, because I know that 
they are very anxious to be present when the 
bill is considered. 

Mr. La Follette — My attention was diverted 
just for the moment. Did I understand the 
.Senator to say he thought that would give them 
an opportunity to be here? 

Mr. Vardaman — I would think so. 

Mr. La Follette — That would give them an 
entire week. Then I will make the request in 
this form: 

I ask unanimous consent that on Wednesday, 
the 15th of October, 1913, immediately upon the 
conclusion of the routine morning business, the 
Senate will proceed to the consideration of the 
bill (S. 136) to promote the welfare of .Ameri- 
can seamen in the merchant marine of the Uni- 
ted States, and so forth, and that not later 
than Saturday, the 18th of October, at 4 o'clock 
on that day 

Mr. Williams — -The calendar day. 

Mr. La Follette — On that calendar day the 
Senate will proceed without further debate to 
vote upon any amendment that may be pending, 
any amendments that may be oflfered, and upon 
the bill, through its regular parliamentary 
stages, to its final disposition. 

Mr. Lea-;— I should like to ask the Senator 
from Wisconsin if he would change those dates 
to Thursday, the 16th, and Monday, the 20th, 
for the reason that a committee of which I am 
a member has an engagement that will take us 
out of town on Saturday, and perhaps eleven 
members of the Senate will be absent. 

Mr. La Follette — I will make that substitution 
of those dates. 

Mr. Brandegee — Mr. President, I have no ob- 
jection to the portion of the agreement that 
provides as to proceeding to the consideration 
of the bill immediately after the morning busi- 
ness on any day. but I know at least one and, 
I think, other Senators are absent who want 
to be heard upon the bill extensively. I do not 
think that unanimous consent for the termina- 
tion of debate upon the bill ought to be given 
now in their absence. I would not object my- 
self, and I am n(jt making this objection for 
myself, but simply speak from what has been 
said to me. I am quite confident that they 
desire to be here, and they are away. I do 
not know what their engagements are and 
whether they can return in time. 

I assure the Senator from Wisconsin I am not 
making any captious objection to the agree- 
ment at all; but I wish he would defer his 
request for unanimous consent until the next 
meeting of the Senate, so that if after those 
gentlemen have had notice that such a request 
was made, and those gentlemen care to do so, 
they themselves may appear and object, if they 
see cause. I will not object, because I have 
not been requested to do it, and I have no ob- 
jection myself, but I simply state what I have 
in mind. 

Mr. La Follette — If the Senator thinks that 
the time would not be sufficient for a full dis- 
cussion of the measure, and that we should vote 
upon it on Tuesday, or even upon Wednesday — 
I do not wish to curtail debate at all. 

Mr. Brandegee — I have no doubt of that. T 
know the Senator wants to be perfectly fair 
about it, and I have no idea 

Mr. La Follette— There are very urgent rea- 
sons why this legislation should be enacted. It 
goes to the safety of human life upon the sea, 
and we are in peril every hour of having re- 
peated just such a disaster as shocked the entire 
world a little more than a year ago. 

I do feel, Mr. President, that we ought to dis- 
pose of this legislation as soon as it can be done 
in an orderlv and proper way. 

Mr. Brandegee — I have no doubt of that my- 
self, and I have no disposition to thwart it in 
any way. I am uninformed as to the provisions 
of the bill; as far as I am concerned, I do not 
expect to take part in the discussion of it; but 
I hope to learn the merits of it from the de- 
bate; and, of course, I shall read the bill. I 
have not read it; I do not know what its merits 
are. I am utterly unable to form an opinion 
as to whether two days or three days or four 
days will be sufficient for the discussion that 
Senators will want to give it. I do not intend 
to object. 

Mr. La Follette — I understand. 

Mr. Brandegee — I simply leave it to the Sen- 
ator. 

Mr. Thomas — Mr. President 

The Vice-President — Does the Senator from 
Wisconsin yield to the Senator from Colorado? 

Mr. La Follette— I yield. 

Mr. Thomas — I was simply going to say that 
the Senator from Wisconsin has been here con- 
stantly during the summer. It has been a very 
long session and one of a very arduous char- 
acter. A few of us have stayed here upon the 
theory that the Senate of the United States 
was the place where a Senator should be when 
the Senate is in session. The Senator from 
Connecticut has been very regular in his at- 
tendance here. Of course. Senators have to 
leave frequently upon urgent business. 

It seems to me. in view of the fact that the 
Senator from Wisconsin has been here right 
along giving his time and attention constantly 
to the public business, when he states that he 
has a measure which is of prime importance, 
one which ought to be enacted at this session, 
particularly if the Senate has no other impor- 



tant business before it, time should to some 
extent be given according to his idea of what is 
necessary and proper under the circumstances. 

Mr. Ashurst — Mr. President, will the Senator 
yield to me for a moment? 
Mr. La Follette — I yield. 

Mr. Ashurst — While I do not happen to have 
the honor to be a member of the committee 
which reported this bill, I must not let this 
occasion pass without saying here that I am 
extremely pleased that the bill has been re- 
ported. I have given the bill considerable 
study, not only during this session but during 
the last session. Before I came to Congress I 
gave a bill somewhat similar to this measure 
much study. 

This bill has for its object the promotion 
of the safety of human life at sea. Do we need 
another "Titanic" disaster to convince us of 
our duty on this bill? How much longer must 
we delay when matters of such supreme impor- 
tance are before us? The bill not only pro- 
motes the safety of passengers and the crew 
of the vessel at sea, but it also has for its 
beneficent purpose the abolition of a very odious 
form of involuntary servitude that has been 
carried on and imposed upon many helpless 
seamen. 

We are here; Congress is supposed to be in 
session; and we ought in good faith to the 
people of the United States manfully to legis- 
late on all subjects upon which we have juris- 
diction or manfully adjourn. 

I join with those who say we ought not to 
ping-pong about from Thursday to Monday, 
then from Monday to Thursday. Let us dili- 
gently take up subjects of legislation and treat 
them as they should be treated, or have the 
nerve and pluck to adjourn — I was about to say 
resign; yes, if we can not do our work we 
ought to resign. 

I earnestly hope that no objection will be 
made, for this bill or some bill of this same 
general character should have been passed years 
ago. 

Mr. Brandegee — Mr. President, just a word. 
Some of the Senators, at least, who desire to 
be heard on this bill are absent. It has been 
generally understood by Senators on both sides 
that we were adjourning three days at a time 
for a report on the Banking and Currency bill. 
It has also been assumed by Senators who have 
gone away that if contested matters were to be 
brought up Senators would raise the question 
of a quorum. That question has not been raised 
to-day; but the Senator from Wisconsin asks 
for a unanimous-consent agreement to take up 
this bill and to vote upon it and all amend- 
ments on a certain day. The question of the 
particular day or the time, in my opinion, is of 
not so much importance. By count there are 
not to exceed 19 Senators upon the floor out of 
a body of 95, and the unanimous consent of 
these 19 binds all the other absent Senators. 

I think that Senators who are away should 
be informed that this request has been made 
to-day and is going to be made again, so that 
they could be here to speak for themselves. 

As I have said, I shall not object to this 
consent if the Senators think that it is fair to 
the absentees who are away on the kind of 
reliance or understanding I have indicated; but 
there is always more or less trouble about 
imanimous-consent agreements when Senators 
feel that they are cut off in what they want 
to say, although I agree they have no excuse 
for protesting against anything that is done 
while they are away, if it is done under the 
rules of the Senate. They should be here to 
protect themselves. 

The Senator from Arizona (Mr. Ashurst) has 
indicated by his expression "ping-ponging" what 
has been happening here for some time, ad- 
journing three days at a time because nobody 
wanted to press any contested matter. If 
that game is to be stopped — and it ought to be 
stopped, in my opinion — Senators will be here 
to protect their right. 

Now, I have said all I care to say. 

Mr. Sheppard — Mr. President 

The Vice-President — Does the Senator from 
Wisconsin yield to the Senator from Texas? 

Mr. La Follette— I do. 

Mr. Sheppard — I think the Senate ought to 
tmderstand that it was the understanding in the 
Committee on Commerce that if this bill was 
reported it would not be considered until the 
regular session. 

Mr. Ashurst — Will the Senator yield to me? 

Mr. Sheppard — In just a minute. And the 
members of that committee who are absent 
went away with that understanding in their 
minds. It is for the Senate to say whether that 
understanding of the committee should be ob- 
served on the floor. I think it due to them 
that the statement ought to be made here. 

Mr. La Follette — The Senator from Texas 
will remember that when the bill was reported 
and laid before the Senate in the presence of 
those Senators, members of the committee who 
had attended at that session of the committee 
which agreed to report it, and when it was at- 
tempted to have it go to the calendar, the 
proposition was made that it should g:o to the 
calendar with the understanding that it should 
not be taken up at this session, thereupon I 
interposed an objection and it went to the 
calendar, subject to be called up at any time. 
So that these Senators were advised then that 
the Senate had not followed their wishes in 
that regard. 

Mr. Sheppard — I recall the occurrence to 



I 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



which the Senator alludes, and I thought it 
due to those Senators to make the statement 
to-day. I am in hearty sympathy, as the Sen- 
ator knows, with this legislation. 

Mr. La Follette — I know it. 

Mr. Fletcher — Mr. President, when this bill 
was reported by the committee, as the Record 
shows, it was with the statement that in the 
judgment of the committee action should not 
be taken on the measure until the regular ses- 
sion next December. That was the judgment 
of the committee, and there are a number of 
members of the committee who are away and 
who are interested in this subject and want to 
be present when it is discussed. 

I would suggest to the Senator from Wis- 
consin that perhaps as far as he ought to go 
to-day, in justice to those absent Senators, is 
to state that on a certain day — on Monday, for 
instance — he would ask unanimous consent for 
a time to take up the bill and vote upon it. In 
other words, I scarcely feel that it would be 
fair to those members of the committee wlio 
are absent to-day to agree that on a certain 
date we would dispose of the bill. I think per- 
haps the Senator will be willing to give notice 
that on Monday next he will ask for that con- 
sent. That perhaps is as far as we ought to 
go in justice to those who are absent, believing 
that the matter would not be taken up at this 
session of Congress. 

Mr. La Follette — I do not think that any 
wrong can be done to any Senator if time 
enough is allowed for debate of the bill. It has 
waited consideration for twenty-two years, and 
I do not think that the matter of senatorial 
convenience should be strained to the last point 
to postpone consideration of the bill any longer, 
and I am going to ask unanimous consent 
that 

Mr. Ashurst — Before the Senator makes that 
request may I make an observation? Certainly 
the precedent should not be established that 
the creature of the Senate, the committee of 
the Senate, can in any way bind the action of 
the Senate. If that be true, then the creature 
could rise higher than its creator, because the 
committee is the creature of the Senate. The 
committee might take the view that the bill 
ought never to be considered. That could not 
bind the Senate if the Senate saw fit to consider 
the bill. Therefore, while I have the most 
profound respect for all the members of the 
committee and for the view of the committee 
and in its idea that it would not be expedient 
to proceed to the consideration of the bill now 

Mr. Vardaman — The committee is not seeking 
to bind anybody. 

Mr. Ashurst — I say it could not in any way 
seek to bind the Senate or bind a Senator 
who is not a member of the committee and 
preclude him from moving to proceed to the 
consideration of this bill. 

Mr. Weeks — Mr. President ■ 

The Vice-President — Does the Senator from 
Wisconsin yield to the Senator from Massa- 
chusetts? 

Mr. La Follette— I do. 

Mr. Weeks — The senior Senator from Ohio 
(Mr. Burton) has been called from Washing- 
ton on account of some important engagements. 
Before leaving Washington he said to me that 
he is interested in this legislation, and he 
hoped to be able to get back before it was 
given consideration in the Senate. I am in- 
terested myself, but mv time is being taken 
entirely at the hearings of the Banking and 
Currency Committee, and I was surprised when 
I found that this bill had been made the un- 
finished business. I am quite sure the Senator 
from Wisconsin wishes to give everyone who is 
interested in this legislation and wishes to take 
part in the debate reasonable opportunity to be 
present. I can be myself, I suppose, by neg- 
lecting duties in other places, but I think the 
senior Senator from Ohio, who is a member 
of the committee, would be very much em- 
barrassed if he were asked to return here before 
the middle of next week. Therefore I hope in 
asking unanimous consent that the Senator 
from Wisconsin will take that into considera- 
tion. 

Mr. La Follette — Mr. President, I was about 
to make my request that the bill be taken up 
on Thursday, the 16th of October, and that 
following the usual form of the request the 
vote be taken at 4 o'clock on the 22d of Oc- 
tober. 

Mr. Williams — The calendar day? 

Mr. La Follette — The calendar day. That 
allows a full week for debate, and I do not 
think that anyone, whether present or not, can 
have anj' reason to complain of such an agree- 
ment. 

The Vice-President — This seems to be a free 
discussion. The Chair has no right to say 
anything; but the Chair suggests that on 
account of the absence of the President pro 
tempore, the chairman of the committee, the 
date should be made the 23d. 

Mr. La Follette^ — Certainly. 

Mr. Weeks — Mr. President, may I suggest to 
the Senator from Wisconsin that the time he 
names for the commencement of the debate 
seems to be perfectly satisfactory, but the time 
of closing the debate and taking a vote on the 
bill, it seems to me, should be determined when 
the members of the committee are here, and 
especially those who are largely interested in 



the proposed legislation. I hope the Senator 
will limit his request for unanimous consent to 
the proposition to commence the debate. 

Mr. La Follette — I could not do that, because 
I do not have to ask unanimous consent to 
commence the debate. 

Mr. Weeks — I understand; the bill is the un- 
finished business. 

Mr. La Follette — If it is to run without limit, 
I must seek to get it up for debate on Monday. 

Mr. Weeks — I will not object to the request. 

The Vice-President — The Secretary will state 
the request made by the Senator from Wis- 
consin. 

The Secretary — The Senator from Wisconsin 
(Mr. La Follette) asks unanimous consent that 
on Thursday, October 16, 1913, immediately 
upon the conclusion of the routine morning 
business the Senate will proceed to the con- 
sideration of the bill (S. 136) to promote the 
welfare of American seamen in the merchant 
marine of the United States, and so forth, and 
that not later than 4 o'clock p. m., Thursday, 
October 23, 1913, the Senate will proceed, with- 
out further debate, to vote upon any amend- 
ment that may be pending, any amendments 
that may be offered, and upon the bill, through 
the regular parliamentary stages, to its final 
disposition. 

The Vice-President — Is there any objection? 
The Chair hears none. The order is entered. 

Mr. La Follette — I wish to have printed for 
the convenience of the Senate the letter written 
by Secretary Redfield and Secretary Wilson to 
the chairman of the Senate Committee on Com- 
merce. I have the letter as printed in my hand, 
hut it bears no document number. I understand 
the edition has been exhausted from the files 
and I ask to have a reprint made of it. 

The Vice-President — Is there objection? The 
Chair hears none, and it is so ordered. 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



tor's loyalty to his own convictions he was 
defeated for re-election by the Gould in- 
terests, who controlled at that time the 
Western Union Telegraph Company. 



A Good Settlement. 

After many conferences of the committee 
representing- the Builders" E.xchange League 
and a committee representing the Building 
Trades Council of Pittsburgh, Pa., an agree- 
ment has been reached with reference to 
the Hodcarriers' and Building Laborers' 
Union. The agreement carries a good 
wage scale and many important regulations. 
One of the sections of the agreement calls 
for the adjustment of any dispute which 
may arise by the joint committee making 
the agreement and which precludes any 
cessation of work during the life of the 
agreement, and further provides that dis- 
putes shall be adjusted by the joint com- 
committee has been notified. It is claimed 
that this settlement has resulted in a better 
understanding among the various trades 
and the contractors and that the result 
achieved will be beneficial to other organi- 
zations. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



An Object Lesson. 

The Ladies' Tailors Union in Bufi'alo, 
under a state of effective organization, se- 
cured a raise in wages of $4 a week and 
reduced their hours from fifty-four to forty- 
eight per week. As frequently occurs, the 
members of the organization did not fully 
appreciate the value of maintaining their 
organization. The members grew apathetic 
and neglected their union, the one and only 
means whereby they could preserve and 
hold their increased wages and shorter 
hours. Finally their employers, learning 
of the situation, were enabled to lengthen 
the hours again to fifty-four. Now the for- 
mer members are exceedingly active in an 
effort to re-establish the union, having re- 
ceived -a salutary lesson, which emphasizes 
the fact that the employers are always on 
the job, and that it behooves those who are 
members of labor organizations to be as 
assiduous as are the employers. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an oificer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above sta- 
ted reasons, or because of rules of the so- 
called "Welfare Plan," by any agent or 
representative of the Lake Carriers' Asso- 
ciation or any of its allied concerns, in- 
cluding the masters and officers of the 
ships. Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 



LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 56 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 ainton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 562. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 7 Woodbrldge Street, East 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 386. 

BAY CITY. MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG. N. Y ...70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenu* 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 B. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 
HEADQUARTERS. 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 
Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 446 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave, Ea«t 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenu* 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS. 

BUFFALO, N. Y.. 55 Main St. Tel. Seneca 2295 

BRANCHES. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 161 Reed Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 314 N. Clark Street 

ASHTABULA, 74 Bridge Street 

TOLEDO, 54 Main Street 

DETROIT, MICH 7 East Woodbrldge Street 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 162 Main Street 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 

SOUTH PT'ICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITALS AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS. 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 

RELIEF STATIONS. 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
L".alngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault St. Marie, Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo. O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



BRITISH TRADE-UNION CONGRESS. 



The forly-si.xlh Annual Congress of the 
Trade Unions of the United Kingdom was 
held at Milton Hall, Manchester, on Mon- 
day, September 1, and the five following 
davs. The Congress was presided over by 
the chairman of the Parliamentary Com- 
mittee, Mr. W. J. Davis, J. P.. General 
Secretary of the National Society of .Amal- 
gamated IJrassworkers and Metal Me- 
chanics. 

The analysis into groups of trades given 
below shows the composition of the Con- 
gress compared with the corresponding 
figures for the Congress of 1912: 



1912 



Groups of Trades. 2 = 









2 

35 O 



■• 






: 3 



1913. 



Z; Z 

?- So 

So . 



Building I 

Mining and quar-l , 

rying I 91 132 566,800 

Kngineering I 121 18| 54.9881 

Shipbuilding (in-l | | 

eluding boiler-! | I I 

making) I 31 10 80.263 

other mftal trades] 4| 35| 71.66411 

Textil.-s I 13»l 8SI 304.61'l 

Clothing I 71 161 64,131 

Transport (land and] I I 1 

water) I 1S| 61| 311,270] 

Chemical. G.as and| I 1 

general laborers.! 81 19| 138,031 

Printing. book-l I I II 

binding, etc I HI 23| 

Pottery and glass. I 4| 5| 

Woodworking, fur-1 I I 

nishing. etc I 71 9 

Baking and clgar-| I 

making I 31 6 

Enginemen I 51 271 

Post Office em-1 I j 

ployes I 51 8 72.846 

Miscellaneous I 171 301 106,793 

Total ..1 1-ni 494ll.9S7.354l 



12 



Z 



0) o 



; 2 

. to 
: 3 

"63,739 



1401 618,465 
18 62.516 



31 101 

51 471 

13*1 941 

71 17 

I 

161 6 



65.7151 
8,1941 

31.047 

12.606 
53,399 



135 



33 



89,782 
93,192 
326.901 
79.104 

317,105 

159,390 

68,954 

8,262 

29..591 

12,601 
51,950 



76.217 
38i 160,067 



o5l|2, 217.836 



The number of organizations accounted 
for in the above statement is 13.=^. but 
.some of these organizations are Federa- 
tions having members of several of their 
constituent trade unions in attendance at 
the Congress. .Allowing for such cases, 
members of about 220 trade unions attend- 
ed as delegates this year out of about 113.^ 
unions in existence. The membership rep- 
resented comprised about two-thirds of the 
total member.ship of all trade unions, and 
showed an increase of 11.6 per cent, as 
compared with a year ago. 

.Among the principal subjects on which 
the Congress passed resolutions were: The 
conduct of the authorities during the dis- 
turbances in Dublin : the ballot to be taken 
under the Trade Unions .Act. 1913, respect- 
ing the inclusion of political action in the 
objects of trade .societies ; the adoption of 
a specified ])eriod for the operation of all 
industrial agreements and the fixing of a 
common date and period for all future 
agreements : the need for an increase of 
wages in view of the enhanced cost of 
living: railway nationalization: the fair 
w-ages clause in Government contracts; the 
eight hours' day: the minimum wage; se- 
curity of tenure of agricultural laborers' 
cottages; legislation against the eviction 
of workpeople during disputes : and the 
amendment of the Workmen's Compensa- 
tion and National Insurance Acts. 

It was also agreed to rescind a resolu- 
tion passed at the Nottingham Congress in 
1908 demanding a minimum wage for 
clerks. 

The voting by Congress for members of 
the Parliamentary Committee for the en- 
suing year resulted in the election of rep- 
resentatives of the following organizations : 
Boilermakers and Iron and Steel Shipbuild- 
ers, General Union of Carpenters and Join- 



ers, Amalgamated Cotton Spinners, Na- 
tional Union of Dock Laborers, National 
Union of Gas and General Workers, Na- 
tional .Amalgamated Brassworkers, Miners' 
Federation. National .Amalgamated Print- 
ers' Warehousemen, National I'nion of 
Railwaymen. .Amalgamated Weavers, .Amal- 
gamated Watermen. Lightermen and 
I'argemcn, Shij) Constructors and Ship- 
wrights, United I'attcrnmakers, National 
.Amalgamated Shop .Assistants, National 
\'ehicle Workers, and .Amalgamated Musi- 
cians. Mr. j. .A. Seddon was elected chair- 
man (it the committee. 



INDUSTRIAL UNIONISM. 
(Continued from Page 1.) 



being, to endeavor to have them co-operate and 
federate for their mutual advantage. 

".\ttention is also c.illed to the provision of 
this suggested amendment to the Constitution 
of the .American Federation of Labor, that if it 
were adopted it would require a two-thirds af- 
firmative vote of the members voting to bring 
about amalgamation, when as a matter of fact, 
amalgamation of several organizations has been 
effected by conference and agreement ratified 
by a ma'ority of the membership, or a ma- 
jority of the convention, voting upon the (|ues- 
tion. Thus it will retard and not facilitate. 

"Years ago we severed the affiliation of the 
.\nierican Branch of the .Amalgamated Society 
of Engineers, and declared that inasmuch as 
its members performed the work in several of 
the machinery trades, the members thereof 
should belong to the international .Association 
of Machinists. The .Allied Metal Mechanics' In- 
ternational Union became part of the Interna- 
tional .Association of Machinists, and the Ma- 
chinists' Helpers' unions ha\e become part 
thereof. 

"The .Amalgamated Wood Workers' Inter- 
national Union amalgamated with and became 
a part of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters 
and Joiners, and the .American Branch of the 
.Amalgamated Society of Carpenters has had its 
charter revoked because it refused to amalga- 
mate with the United Brotherhood of Car- 
penters and Joiners. 

"In accordance with the instructions of the 
.Atlanta Convention, efforts were made to have 
the International .Association of Steam and Hot 
Water Fritters and Helpers amalgamate with the 
United .Association of Plumbers, Gasfitters. 
Steamfitters, and Steamfitters' Helpers. Because 
of the refusal of the former, we have en- 
deavored to carry the instructions into effect 
that there should be but one organization recog- 
nized in the pipe fitting industry, and that the 
United .Association of Plumbers, Gasfitters, 
Steamfitters, and Steamfitters' Helpers. The 
United .Association has within its membership 
those branches of the trades included in its 
title. 

"The International Molders' Union of North 
.America now encompasses molders of all metals, 
and some years ago the Coremakers' Interna- 
-ional Union became amalgamated with it. 

"The Longshoremen have pilots and steam 
shovelmen in addition to their own workers, 
loncshorcmen. 

"Rlaclcsmitlis have cb.iin makers and helpers. 

"The Lasters' International Union became 
amalgamated with the Boot and Shoe W'orkers' 
International Union. 

"The Iron and Steel Workers are organizing 
the unskilled with the skilled of the trade. 

"The miners have jurisdiction over all work 
in and around the mines. 

"Granite Cutters have added polisiicrs, rub- 
bers, sawyers, and the tool sharpeners have 
been part thereof from the beginning. 

"Quarry Workers have added derrickmen. 
boxing and strapping. 

"Railroad Telegraphers have added station 
agents, signalmen, train despatchers. telephoners, 
pneumatic interlockers, and staffmen. 

"The Journeymen Tailors' International Un- 
ion, the United Garment Workers of North 
.America, and the Ladies' Garment Workers' In- 
ternational Union are endeavoring to bring 
about an amalgamation of the three organiza- 
tions, or to bring about a closer co-operative 
eflfort. 

"So on might we quote nearly all of the na- 
tional and international unions in their constant 
effort to a more thorough and comprehensive 
organization of their own fellow workers in the 
trade, or in kindred trades. 

■'.And yet it is also true that in some few 
organizations the amalgamation of various 
branches of one industry having been accom- 
plished, they have voluntarily separated into a 
number of international unions of their respect- 
ive branches. That is especially true of the 
International Typographical Union, w-hich until 
some vears ago had imder its jurisdiction and 
part of the organization the compositors, proof- 
readers, pressmen, bookbinders, stereotypers, 
and electrotyners, mailers, news writers, nhoto- 
engravers. By agreement the bookbinders, 
stereotypers and clectrotypers, and photo- 



engravers, have formed separate organizations 
from the International Typographical Union, 
and generally co-operating in their local and 
national councils. 

"The American trade-union movement is one 
of constant growth, development and expansion. 
Since its inception, the -American Federation of 
Labor has been the most practical and beneficial 
general organization of the wage workers of 
the continent; has taken cognizance of the con- 
stant change and transition in industry and by 
every means within its power has sought not 
only to effect the organization of unorganized 
workers, but to bring about unity, solidarity, 
and fraternity among organized workers, and 
has stimulated by every means within its power 
the necessity for closer co-operation, federation 
and amalgamation of existing trade unions to 
the end that each may be helpful to all. 

"The American Federation of Labor realizes 
that a chain is no stronger than its weakest 
link; that the grand army of organized labor 
can not advance much further than its most 
backward column; that the labor organizations 
are made up of human beings who are not cast 
in plastic molds; can not be placed in rigid 
forms, and therefore, it must concede that the 
authority vested in the affiliated imions and 
their members must be the largest consistent 
with the general progress and the welfare of 
the entire wage-working masses. 

"The .American Federation of Labor has or- 
ganized central bodies in hundreds of cities, 
anfl .State federations in nearly all the States 
in .America; has instituted a large number of 
international unions and numberless local un- 
ions, and has developed the system of Indus- 
trial Departments which federate the organized 
workers of the different crafts, trades and call- 
ings and which co-operate for the common pro- 
tection and advancement of the interest of all. 

"The .American Federation of Labor realizes 
tliat there is still much to do, but repudiates 
the insinuation which is implied by the term 
'Industrial Unionism' as it is employed by the 
so-called 'Industrial Workers of the World' in 
antagonism to 'Trade Unionism' for in that im- 
plication the false impression is conveyed that 
the trade unions are rigid, unyielding, or do 
not adjust themselves to meet new conditions 
and do not advance, develop or expand, where- 
as the whole history of the trade-union move- 
ment in the past thirty years demonstrates be- 
yond successful contradiction, that there is not 
a day which passes, but which witnesses in the 
trade-union movement, in .America the highest 
and loftiest spirit of sacrifice in order to co- 
operate with our fellow workers for their in- 
terest and comtnon uplift. 

"In line with the historic, intelligent, and 
comprehensive attitude which the .American F"ed- 
eration of Labor has pursued since its inception, 
we urge still greater effort and energy in the 
work of more thoroughly organizing the un- 
organized workers, pursued to its fullest extent; 
to urge upon the organized workers a more 
thorough co-operation, to advocate amalgama- 
tion of organizations of kindred trades and call- 
ings, and a more thorough federation of all or- 
ganized labor, to the end that economic, po- 
litical, moral and social justice shall come to the 
toilers, the wealth producers of .America." 

During the Rochester Convention, the follow- 
ing resolution, designated in the proceedings as 
resolution No. 13, was acted upon as indicated: 

"Resolved, By the Thirty-second Annual Con- 
vention of the American Federation of Labor, 
that the Executive Council of this Federation 
be instructed to arrange conferences between 
the representatives of the various international 
imions where there is more than one interna- 
tional membership employed in any given in- 
dustry, and that every eflort by the Executive 
Council be extended to bring about a federa- 
tion of such unions to the end that joint action 
may be assured in all disputes between organ- 
ized labor and the employing classes." 

The committee on ad'ustment, to which the 
resolution had been referred, reported as fol- 
lows: 

"Your committee reports that the principle 
contained in this resolution is covered by Sec- 
tion 2 of the Autonomy Declaration ot the 
Scranton Convention. We, therefore, recom- 
mend that the resolution be referred to the 
Executive Council of the .American Federation 
of Labor, with instructions to do whatever it 
properly can to establish co-operation among 
the organizations of kindred trades." 

The report of the committee was adopted. 

Now for the three million mark! 



The private car of the Czar of Russia 
is said to be practically dynamite proof, 
and owing to its weight it could not be 
run on the major part of the European 
lines. The car is elegantly furnished and 
also contains a chapel, where prayers are 
olTered for his safety. The Czar travels 
with only one chef, who is well along in 
years and who served his father and for 
awhile the grandfather of the present Ger- 
man emperor. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



11 



HELP THE MINERS. 



Washington, D. C, Sept. 29, 1913. 
To All Organized Labor: 

Each new advance in human betterment 
leaves its furrows of pain and sufifering 
across human hearts and lives. There is 
scarcely a worker in all America who 
does not know the meaning of a strike, 
during which the workers and their fami- 
lies have suffered and endured in order to 
obtain justice ; or who has not felt the 
terrible fear for the physical safety of 
loved ones in the thick of the contest, or 
the heart-breaking pain because of inabil- 
ity to supply even the barest necessities 
of life for those dependent upon him. To 
you, members of organized labor, the 
brave struggle of the copper miners of 
Calumet, Michigan, will appeal with great- 
est effect. 

After exhausting all other means of se- 
curing the just demands which they made 
upon their employers, these miners laid 
aside their tools on July 23, and went out 
on a strike. They had been working a 
so-called ten-hour day, which in reality 
was an eleven-hour day, for wages that 
would not permit American standards of 
living. Miners have been forced to handle 
individually heavy drilling machines which 
had formerly been operated by two men. 
After considering all matters the men de- 
cided to demand an eight-hour day, three 
dollars as the minimum wage, and two 
men to handle drilling machines as for- 
merly. All requests for conferences or 
consideration of these just demands were 
ignored and treated with contempt. 

Despite the fact that the strike was 
inaugurated peacefully and has been con- 
ducted by the miners without even the 
slightest show of violence, seldom has 
there been such a display of arbitrary 
methods on the part of the mine operators 
and governmental authorities. The morn- 
ing after the strike began hundreds of 
deputies were sworn in ; the employers 
imported companies of Waddell-Mahon 
guards; finally State troops were sent to 
the mining district that the mine owners 
might be enabled to operate their mines 
and the voice of Labor in its appeal for 
justice might be silenced. All of this dis- 
play of force was under the pretense of 
protecting property (when the miners did 
not attack it, nor contemplate attacking 
it) ; when the miners attempted to protect 
and promote human rights, they were 
ridden down in the streets, clubbed, fired 
upon ! 

Though there have been the usual efforts 
to foment strife and to stir up violence 
among the strikers, yet no property has 
been destroyed and the miners have re- 
mained steadfast in their determination 
to win their rights, and in their deter- 
mination not to be forced into lawlessness. 

The officials of the miners asked for an 
injunction restraining the appointment of 
additional deputies to serve the mine op- 
erators — their request was refused. -The 
mine operators asked for an injunction re- 
straining the strikers from picketing, "mo- 
lesting" men going to or from work and 
from parading in the vicinity of the mines 
— that order was granted. 

Such are the conditions under which 
these copper miners are waging their fight 
for justice and a life somewhat better 



worth living. With all the forces of capi- 
tal and organized society working against 
them, they have maintained courage, de- 
termination and good spirit. There are 
16,000 miners engaged in this struggle. A 
large number of miners and their families 
were evicted from their homes owned by 
the corporations. The lives, safety, and 
welfare of something like 50,000 men, 
women, and children are bound up with 
its fate. The strike has now been in 
progress for over two months and still 
the mine operators maintain stubborn re- 
sistance and unreasonable refusal to con- 
sider the demands of the men. The long, 
hard winter of northern Michigan is ap- 
])n:aching, and these brave men, women 
and children who are bearing the brunt of 
this fight for industrial justice for Ameri- 
can workingmen are in need. 

Two members of our Executive Council. 
John Mitchell and John 11. I^ennon, have 
been among these strikers and presented 
to us unquestionable evidence of the con- 
ditions there. After consideration of the 
conditions, the need and importance of the 
issues involved, the Executive Council 
makes this api)eal to all the members of 
organized labor ff)r ]>rom])t and generous 
financial assistance to aid these needv and 
suffering fellow-workers, their wives and 
children. 

^^ c appeal in the name of all lal)or and 
common humanity that each local union 
at once make an appropriation from its 
funds of not less than five cents for each 
member; that each Central Labor Union 
select a committee to appeal to all work- 
ers and friends to contribute promptly and 
as generously as possible, and to use ever\' 
other honorable means by which funds 
may be secured. The men and women 
and children of Calumet, Michigan, must 
not he star\-ed into submission. The}' 
must and they will win, if the toilers of 
our country will !)ut do their duty. 

Reinember that the splendid solidarity 
of the workers oi America largely aided in 
securing the magnificent \'ictory of the 
anthracite miners a few years ago. The 
newspapers have suppressed nearly all ref- 
erence to the Calumet miners' strike. In 
this appeal we hope to reach the minds, 
hearts, and the consciences of our fellow- 
workers and friends, and thereby secure 
their ready response to the call for aid. 

Send all contributions to Frank ]\lorri- 
son. Secretary. American Federation of 
Labor, Ouray Building, Washington, D. C, 
who will return receipt for the same and 
promptly forward every dollar to the im- 
mediate aid of the struggling miners of 
Calumet. 

Fraternally yours, 

Sam'l GoMPiiRS, President. 
Fr.\nk Morrkson, Secretarv. 



vSince the supreme intelligence of the 
German shepherd dogs was brought to the 
notice of the police authorities in Berlin, 
eight years ago, 1956 dogs have been at- 
tached to the department. Although there 
are so many of these dogs in Germany, it 
is difficult to purchase a good one and an 
ordinary and not fully trained dog costs 
about $200. There is also a feeling that 
it is somewhat unpatriotic to sell the best 
German dogs, since the}' are of great serv- 
ice to the police and the military. 



LABOR'S CCONOmC PLATPURM. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition uf all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
wliere the work is performed. 

6. Release froin employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman Suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Xiandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualifications in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, wuh such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

20. We favor a system of United States Gov- 
ernment Postal Savings Banks. 



INTERNATIONAL SEAMEIM'S UNION 
or AMERICA. 

(('(intlnued from Page 5.) 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal.. 4L' Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Rooms 203-205. Grand Trunk 
Dock, P. O. Box 1335. 

PORTLAND, Ore., New Grand Central Hotel, Room 
110, Third and Flanders Sts. 

SAN PEDKO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



UNITED FISHERMEN OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 

ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

Branches: 

LA CONNER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 

LA CONNER, Wash. 

GRAYS HARBOR FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
ABERDEEN, Wash,. P. O. Box 34. 

DUWAMISH FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
GEORGETOWN, Wash. 

SKAGIT RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
FIR. Wash., P. O. Box 6. 

COQUILLE RIVER FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
PROSPER, Ore. 
ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 2), 

KETCHIKAN. 
LORING, Alaska. 

ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION (Local No. 3). 
PE'I'ERSBIIRG. Alaska. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 93 Steuart St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneea St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore.. P. O. Box 138. 



The Coast Seamen's Journal 

CJan be procured by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned places: 
also at tlie headquarters of th» 

FEDERATED SEAMEN'S UNION OF AUSTRALASIA 

» ERSKINE STREET, 8YDNKY, N. •. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 




SEATTLE, WASH. 



Residence Phone Ballard 1639 



An eight-hour day for all State 
employes is proposed by California's 
Civil Service Commission, accord- 
ing to an announcement made by 
Charles W. Reed, president of the 
Commission. The Commission has 
asked Attorney-General Webb if 
there is any State law prohibiting 
the adoption and enforcement of 
such a rule. 

California State Labor Comissioner 
John P. McLaughlin is conducting 
an inspection of labor camps 
throughout California, in order to as- 
certain their sanitary condition and 
make imrovements where required. 
Commissioner McLaughlin is also 
arranging to have the branches of 
the State Labor Bureau make daily 
reports to the main office in San 
Francisco. 

Senator Myers of Montana has 
presented to the Senate resolutions 
adopted at a mass meeting of citi- 
zens in Butte, Montana, calling upon 
the Congress of the United States 
to institute a Congressional investi- 
gation in order that the true facts, 
as they exist, in the Copper Mining 
District of the State of Michigan 
may be made public. It is further 
asked that upon the results of this 
investigation be based remedial legis- 
lation. 

An investigation of wages and liv- 
ing conditions of women and girls 
employed in Minnesota is being 
made by the Minimum Wage Com- 
mission. Circular letters have been 
sent out to all female wage workers 
in the State, containing twenty-three 
questions. These questions, of course, 
relate to the general subject of 
wages, hours, living expenses, etc. 
Upon the replies will be determined 
recommendations for a betterment of 
the conditions of the working women 
and girls of the State. 

Officers of four labor unions, rep- 
resenting 230,000 railroad employes, 
will meet at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
about October 15 to plan a general 
move for higher wages and im- 
proved working conditions. The 
unions to be represented are the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engin- 
eers, Brotherhood of Locomotive 
Firemen, Brotherhood of Railway 
Trainmen, and the Order of Rail- 
way Conductors. The meeting here 
will be preliminary to action by each 
separate organization. 

Three thousand five hundred long- 
shoremen, cotton screwmen and dray- 
men settled their diflfercnces and 
called oflf the strike which crippled 
the Galveston water front for sev- 
eral days. The principal issue, that 
negro cotton screwmen become un- 
ionized, was settled by the proposi- 
tion that they affiliate with the In- 
ternational Longshoremen's Union 
under separate charter. At Texas 
City where the longshoremen struck 
in sympathy with the Galveston men, 
work was also resumed. 

A reduction in the force at the 
navy yard in Washington, D. C, 
brought forth an appeal to the Navy 
Department to allot a sufficient 
amount of work to the yard which 
would preclude any further reduc- 
tions in the present force. In con- 
sequence thereof the Navy Depart- 
ment has issued orders for the man- 
ufacture of numerous supplies needed 
by the Navy Department and which 
can be manufactured at that yard. 
This will temporarily, at least, fore- 
stall any further depletion of the 
force. 



MARSHALL'S 
Navigation School 



Day and Night 
REASONABLE TERMS 
202-4 Grand Trunk Pacific Dock 



SEATTLE 



EUREKA, CAL. 



SMOKB 

The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Prlnceii" and other 
high grade union -made cigara. 
Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 
UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 

OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



Vernon W. Buck Carl G. Benson 
BUCK. BENSON & KNUTSON 
Lawyers and Prectors In Admiralty 
Free Advice to Seamen. 

1265 Empire Building, 

Seattle, Wash. 

Vi tala og skrifva de nordiska spraag. 



Bonney-Watson Co. 

UNDERTAKERS 
3rd and Columbia 8ts., Seattle, Wash. 
Preparing bodies for shipping a spe- 
cialty. All orders by telephone or 
telegraph promptly attended to 
Phone, Main 13 
Independent: Elliott 254 



ALASKA HOTEL 

Corner Western and Seneca 

The newest 25-cent house in town. 

New building, new furniture. 

Special attention to mariners. 

FREE BATHS 

Special Weekly Rates 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor. 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 

At 

WESTERMAIM8.SCHERIV1ER 

220 and 222 First Avenue, South 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

Seattle Navigation School 

Open tha entir* year, 
and in touch with 
latest requlPMnents. 
Candidates thoroughly 
prepared for Ucen>« 
of any grade; Master, 
Mate or Pilot; Ocean, 
Coast or Inland, 

By CART. W. J. SMITH, 
Nautical Expert, 
Graduate of Trinity Nautical Coller*, 
Licensed Master of Ocean steam and 
sail vessels (unlimited), and Maater 
and Pilot for Inland waters. Author of 
"Self-Instructor in Navigation," Author 
of "Practical Compass Adjustment." 
Compass Adjuster. 

507 MARITIME BUILDINQ 
911 Western Ave., SBATTLB, Wash. 

Phones: 
School, Main 3300. Res. Queen Anna 604 




CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 
Manufacturers of all Itinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, SarsaparlUa and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jaclcson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Herman Schulze 

- CIGAR MANUFACTURER - 
Cigars at Wholesale and Retail 

439 SECOND STREET 

Corner F EUREKA, CAL. 

White Labor Only 



K. R. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hnts and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



SCANDIA HOTEL 

H. WENOORD, Proprietor 

FIRST-CLASS BOARD AND LODGING 

Reasonable Rates 

Front Street, between C and D 

EUREKA, CAL. 



For 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

or 

A SQUARE MEAL 

Try 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 

Under a rule adopted by the Seatte 
Postofflce. letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from date 
of delivery. If members are unable to call 
or have their mail forwarded during that 
period, they should notify the Agent to 
hold mail until arrival. 
Abrahamsen, Jo- Johnson, A. 

hannes Jensen, Hans -21H 

Anderson, H. Jensen. G. S. 

Andersen, A. -1352 Johanson. Knut 
Alonzo, J. Johannesen. Olaf 

Absalomsen, O. M. Johanson, K. J. 
Alexis, H. Johanson, Theodor 

Agerup, K. B. Johnson, O. 

Andersen, O. -1719 Johnson, Olaf 
Anderson, A. -1S21 Kalning. J. 
Anderson, II. TornI Krutz, Ivan 
Anderson, Ragnvald Klfibnlkoff. L W. 
Anderson, David Korber, Th. 
Ander.'son, I. Krcutz. Karl 

Anderson. Hjalmar Karslma, N. 



Behr, Henry 
Burholtz, F. 
Borgen, K. S. 
Brox. H. 
Brower, G. 
Broberg, Chas. 
Buekow. C. W. 



Karrell, J. 
Kolberg, Joe 
Larsen, L. A. 
Larsen, Charles 
Little. Sid 
Ljunggren. Edmund 
Lof, Oscar 



Christensen, Anton Larson, Ingvald 



Crosiey, J. 
Carlson. Thure 
Davidson. Jacob 
Davis, Joseph 
Dylwik. E. 
T>atl. Carl 
Ellinsen. H. O 
Enig, Herman 
Khlert, August 
Edvardsen, Anton 
Rkwall, G. A. 
Kllison. Sam 
Eliason, C. 
Krikson, Axel 
Kskilsen. Lars 
Kvangpr. Nils 
Fonshmd. Victor 



I>arsen, Axel -1746 
Larson, John 
I^iovera, P. 
Lackey, C. 
I^arsen, L. 
Larsen, John 
Larsen. A. 
Larsen. Fred 
Lundgren. K. J. 
Marks, T. 
Martins, Paul 
McPhcrson, R. 
McCarthy, J. 
Mortensen, J. C. 
Murphy. D. 
Mvncbmever, II. 
Maver, J. S. 



Abramis, George 
-■Vnderson, Sam 
Anderson, Gust, 

-1808 
Anderson, Nils 
Anderson, Die 
Andersen, Mike 
Anderson. Otto 
Anderson, Erik B. 
Allcxaiider, John 
.-Vlljrerhtsen, Page 
.\ndrolio, A. 



Larsen, Engvald 
Larsen, Martin, 

-1710 
Larsen, Soren 
Lerch, Paul 
Lewik, Karl 
Lemari'hand, Louis 
Lciideman. Rulitii 
Lundsoor. Oskar 
Landmark, Heege 
Lundiiuist, Ernest 
Macrae, Alle-xander 



Horgman, Karl W. Marchand, Louis 

Brodig, Wm. G. Mattson, Maurits 

Bolts. Ernest Miller, Chas. 

Bucknier, W. McManus, John 

Carlsen, Charlie McMahon, Jack 

Chase. W. P. Meinke, Rudolf 

Christensen, Albert Meyer, W. 

Colman, E. Nelson, Anton 

Conway, M. E. Nelsen, C. J. 

Collins. Frank Nielsen, Kristian 

Cunnicham, W. P. Nielsen, Edward 



Dahl, Henry 
Day, Aca 
Dennis, Charlie 
Dorff, William 
Edstrom. John 
Ehenbaugh, W. 
Ekham, Frans 



Nilsson, Osvold 
Narberg, John 
Narman, Ludwig 
Ohlsen, Charles 
Olsen, Severin 
Olsen. Ausgar 
O'Brien, Jack 



Fredrickson, H. G. Person, Charles 
Gjortz, P. Perouse, Andre 

Gordia, Piet Petrich. Tiieodore 

Gulliksen, Amandus Petersen, Aage 
Hall, G. A. Peterson, Hans 

Hansen, Bernard Peterson, Heinle 
Helin. Waldemar Petterson, Einar 
Heiiriks, Waldemar Pedersen, Peter 
fienke, Ernest Pratt, M. L. 

Heilnian, Albln Rantio, Jacob 

Helenius, Oskar Raetz. August 



Frodriksen. Harold Macdonald, N. 



Fjellman, Geo. 
Freeman, J. 
Franzell, A. 
Fjelstad, K. M. 
Forsen. Alex 
Fortune. John 
Framness. Ivar 
Gaugsenid, O. K. 
Gphler, F. 
Grant. J. .T. 
Grantley. C. W. 
Gunderson, I^. S. 
Hansen. A. M. 
H.insen, Hans 
TIelpap. A. 
Hansen, Hans P. 
Hansen. N. S. 
Hoglund, Ephralm 
TTolst. L. 
Hubner, Herman 
Jaeger. F. J. 
.Tacohsen, Torgiis 
Jacobsen. Johan 



Martinsen. Harold 
Makl. Ivar 
Mathisen, Nils 
McNeary. J. 
MoDougall, J. 
MillPr. J. C. 
Mikkelsen, K. -Ifi20 
Moore, .1. M. 
Mulr. J. 
Munroe, W. 
Martinsen, Ragn- 
vald 
Newland E. 
Nielsen, F. M. 
Nilsen. T. H. 
Nielsen, C. 
Nelson, H. J. 
Nicholsen. F. E. 
Nilson, Andrew 
Nnllsen, Rdvard 
Nielsen, Alfons 
Nilsen. Albert 
Nylund, Arthur 



Hohm, E. 
Huntington, E. R. 
Horh, Gore 
Hultinan, A. 
Joliansen, Johan F, 
Johnson, Chris 
Johnson, Axel 
Johnson, Jack 
Johnson, OJe C. 
Johnson, W. 
Johnson, H. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Karlson, K. E. 
Kenny. James 
Kealy, James 
KIkur, Allesander 
Koop. Nick 
Kronstrand, H. T. 
Kristensen, W. 
Koalvik. Oscar 
I.,alne, Frank 
Larsen, .Tohn 
Larsen, George 
Lurberg 



Rasmussen. Thor 
Roed, Halfdan 
.Sandstrom. Hugo 
Sanders. Chas. 
SImens, O. L. 
Schulz. Robert 
Saule, J. L. 
Swanson, John 
Swenson, Carl Oscar 
Saukha, August 
Swenson, John B. 
Thomas, A. 
Tamford, B. A. 
Trost. Peter 
■U-^all. W. H. 
Warren, Chas. B. 
Wadren. G. F. 
Westlund, Gust 
Wehi, J. 

Wiejurecht. Ernest 
Weshart, Jno. 
Welsen. J. 
Bunk, Bruno 



AMERICAN EXCHANGE HOTEL 
Headquarters for Scandinavians 

OLUF KARLSEN, Proprietor 

GOOD BOARD AND LODGING 

By the Day, Week or Month. Meals 25c. 

First Street, between D and B 

EUREKA, CAL. 

Telephone Main 449 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
12S D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



^A^^«^>^^i^^^^i^a^^k^t^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^/^>^^^^^^^^ 



HOTEL YOUNG 

European Plan 

313-315-317 SECOND ST., EUREKA 

Rooms, 25c per Night up 

Per Week, $1.50 up 

UNION LUNCH COUNTER 



HUMBOLDT EXPRESS 

I. E. PALMER, Proprietor 

A Union Man 

Baggage and Express Promptly 

Delivered to Any Part 

of the City 

Stand — Sailors' Hall — 553-R 

EUREKA 



^^^^^^^^^^^A^^^^^^^^^^^/>^\^%^S/WW^^^^^% 



O'Brien. J. S. 
Olsen, C. 
Olsen, Trygve 
Olsson, Brov 
Olsen, O. -1062 
Olsen, Ed 
Olsen, C. E. 
Olsen. B. -697 
Omholt, T. 
Orell, A. 
Pedersen. O. A. 
Poppe, Geo. 
Petterson, Karl 
Pedersen, Hedley 
Pedersen, P. C. 
Pedersen, Peder 



Persson, Joh.an 
Petterson, Harry 
Petersen, V. -1447 
Petterson, Richard 
Petterson. S. 
Quigley, R. E. 
Rees, W. 

Skubber. H. (Reg- 
istered) 
Stahlbaum. E. 
Stone, C. L. 
Saudburg. C. 
Schuldt, Theoder 
Seley, G. 
Sterr, W. T. 
Saar, J. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES. HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union made. 
PAGE & SCHWARTZ 
Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



^^VN^VW^/WW^'W>/WS/VS^W"*^N/S^>i*%'V>^WN^>/S^ 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List. 



Ahlstrom, Harry 
Anderson, John 
Breien, Hans 
Clausen, Fred 
Debus, Fred 
Ehlert, August 
Gudrnundsen 
mund 



Jacobsen. W. 
Jensen, George 
Nilson. Anton 
Miller. Fred 
Publlcatus, August 
Plas, Henry 
Gud- Robertson, A. 

Syvertsen, Paul 



Hansen, Harald Thorsen, Fredrik 

Isnias, Richard 



Samuelson, H. Thomson, P. 

SchuUz. P. (Regis- Tyghe, T. 



tered) 
Schultz. Axel 
Scott, Alfred 
Starness, C. O. 
Storek 

Stewart. J. G. 
Strauss. W. 
St. Johns, C. R. 
Suarth. A. 
Steel. J. R. 
Sharness, C. O. 
Sperlan, B. 



Thienpoint, F. 
Thogren, David 
Thorsen, Tom 
■Veasted. T. P. 
A'an Loo. A. 
Verney. A. 
Waischwell. A. 
Warner, .lake 
Waters, \j. A. 
Wehde, F. 
Wessman, John 



J 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL. 



13 



PORTLAND, OR. 

WM. JOHNiSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Clieck for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8296 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



Tacoma, Wash., Letter List. 



Anderson, Carl 

Anton 
Berglind, Erik 
Conley, J. H. 
Dehler, Alfred 
Christensen, Albert 
Dehler, Alfred 
Ellison, Harry H. 
Eidsvoog, Patter 
Fors, Alfred 
Grovefi Albert 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, Johannes 
Hangpn, Arthur 
Hetman, Walter 
Iversen, Ivar 



Jorgensen, Peter A. 
Kalberg, Wm. 
Kesler, Karl 
Kathy, A. 
Melgail, M. 
Moren, G. H. 
Nilsson, Bdvin 
Olsen, Olaf 
Olsen, Martin E. 
Persson, John 
Plesner, Levi J. 
Person, Fritz 
Petterson, J. M. 
Simonsen, Sigvald 
Seblom. John 
Thorsen, Axel L. 



PORT TOWNSEND, WASH. 

FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made CIGARS, 
TOBACCO, ETC. Call at his old Red 
Stand on Water Street, Port Townsend. 
Next door to Waterman & ■ Katx, Just 
around the corner from the Union Office. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 

(Incorporated) 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in LIVE 
STOCK, FRESH MEATS AND VEG- 
ETABLES. Shipping supplied at 
lowest rates. :: Port Townsend, Wash. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 

DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 

no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Booi and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



ABERDEEN, WASH. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Chas. A. Pragge, Mgr. Chas. B. Coon, Pres. 

Port Townsend Mercantile Co. 

(Inc.) 

WholeBaU and Retail 

GROCERS 

SHIPS PROVISIONED 
311-13 Water St., Port Townsend, Wash. 

Warehouse: 
Bartlett Wharf, Port Townsend, Wash. 

Aberdeen, Wash., Letter Liat. 



Anderson, Ernest 
Anderson, -1283 
Aalto, Waino 
Andersen, F. C. 
Anderson, Axel P. 
Arntzen, Werner 
Armstrong, Harry 
Berger, C. 
Behn, Alfred 
Brown, C. 
Carlstrom, John 
Christensen, Albert 
Carson, Edward 
Duval, Bennet 
Edwardsen, Anton 
Finth, Richard 
Flatten, James 
Granberg, Eric 
Graf, Otto 
Glase, Gustav 
Hohn, Arthur 
Herman, Axel 
Hansen, Ove 
Johansen, Harry 
Jensen, Harry 



Kaiser, Fred 
Kallio, Frans 
Loining, Hermand 
Ljungberg, Herman 
Lengtssen, Gottfried 
Laine, Herman 
Lorsin, G. L. 
Mertz, G. 
Mekerman, Ernest 
Nikolin, E. Miko 
Olsen, Nils 
Oksanen, Juko 
Peterson, Axel 
Petersen, Christian 
Rommel, Andrew 
Stangeland, Peter S. 
Schacht, H. 
Thorn, -70 
Walder, Olsen N. 
Wind, Jacob, -1357 
Zoerb, Walter 
Packag